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RJ-45 Type-C F ] 6. How many tests must a person take in order to be A+ certified? [0 150 meters '3000';

app.get('/', (req, res) => {

  res.send('Hello World!')

})

app.listen(port, () => {

  console.log(`Example app listening at http://localhost:${port}`)

})

Apps injects the port the webapp should run on as an environment variable called, PORT. This is easily read by Node.js as shown.

6. Add a start command to the scripts section in package.json:

"scripts": {

    "start": "node index.js",

    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"

  },

7. Create a new GitHub repository, it can be private or public, and check your node project into it.

Then follow from step 3 of the Static Asset app above. Note at step 8, Apps has automatically configured npm start as the run command, having detected a Node application and you can select the pricing plan on the same screen.

WARNING: Node applications are NOT free on DigitalOcean App Platform. Make sure you delete unwanted applications from the Settings tab.

Docker App

As well as Node.js, Apps appears to support Ruby, Go and Python nativity, as well as others. What about .Net or other languages and platforms? For those Apps supports Docker. Let’s see if we can get a simple dotnet core application running in Apps.

1. Create a new directory for a dotnet core project (e.g. dotnetcore) and move into it.

2. Create a dotnet core web application:

dotnet new webapp

3. Add a Dockerfile to the project:

FROM mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/core/sdk:3.1 AS build-env

WORKDIR /app

# Copy everything else and build

COPY . ./

RUN dotnet publish dockercore.csproj -c Release -o out

# Build runtime image

FROM mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/core/sdk:3.1

WORKDIR /app

COPY --from=build-env /app/out .

EXPOSE $PORT

ENTRYPOINT [ "dotnet", "dockercore.dll" ]

Apps injects the port the webapp should run on as an environment variable called, PORT. Make sure the Docker image will expose it as shown.

4. To make sure the application runs on the port injected add the following UseUrls method call in program.cs:

public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args)

{

    var port = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("PORT") ;

    return Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)

        .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>

        {

            webBuilder.UseStartup<Startup>().UseUrls($"http://+:{port}");

        });

}

5. To prevent the application trying to redirect to a non-existent ssl port, remove or comment out the following line from startup.cs. 

// app.UseHttpsRedirection();

6. Building a dotnet core application generates a lot of intermediate files that you don’t want to check in, so add an appropriate .gitignore file to the root of the project.

7. Create a new GitHub repository, it can be private or public, and check your dotnet core project into it.

Then follow from step 3 of the Static Asset app above. Note at step 8, Apps has detected the Dockerfile and is not giving the option for build commands. You don’t need to specify any run commands and you can select the pricing plan on the same screen.

WARNING: Docker based  applications are NOT free on DigitalOcean App Platform. Make sure you delete unwanted applications from the Settings tab.

Finally

There was one big disadvantage for me and that’s the lack of a free tier for anything more advanced than a static web application. The cost isn’t extortionate (https://www.digitalocean.com/docs/app-platform/#plans-and-pricing), but quite a bit for hobby programmers. If you want to use a database on top there’s a further cost, whereas this is free to begin with in Heroku.

Apps currently only supports GitHub. You can use private repositories, which is great, but I’d like to see BitBucket support as well. Heroku has its own git repositories as well as supporting external repositories. 

I’d also like there to be Terraform support for Apps as there is for the rest of the DigitalOcean services. However, given that Apps in Beta, I can see why it isn’t supported yet.

Overall Apps was very easy to use and had a much shallower learning curve and was generally easier to use than Heroku.  DigitalOcean, do you think we could have AWS style Lambdas next, please?

I've had much anticipation for this release and I wasn't disappointed. While it lacks the epic nature of Severn Seals and New Religion until the final (13 minute!) track, it's packed full of solid power metal songs. Unlike most albums, I found it instantly enjoyable on first listen. Other than the lack of epicness, my only complaint would be it's rather short. I'm fully expecting this to become one of my favourite albums of 2020.

Metal Commando

Why

When Naked Element was still a thing, we used DigitalOcean almost exclusively for our client’s hosting. For the sorts of projects we were doing it was the most straightforward and cost effective solution. DigitalOcean provided managed databases, but there was no facility to automatically back them up. This led us to develop a Python based program which was triggered once a day to perform the backup, push it to AWS S3 and send a confirmation or failure email.

We used Python due to familiarity, ease of use and low installation dependencies. I’ll demonstrate this later on in the Dockerfile. S3 was used for storage as DigitalOcean did not have their equivalent, ‘Spaces’, available in their UK data centre. The closest is in Amsterdam, but our clients preferred to have their data in the UK. 

Fast forward to May 2020 and I’m working on a personal project which uses a PostgreSQL database. I tried to use a combination of AWS and Terraform for the project’s infrastructure (as this is what I am using for my day job) but it just became too much effort to bend AWS to my will and it’s also quite expensive. I decided to move back to DigitalOcean and got the equivalent setup sorted in a day. I could have taken advantage of AWS’ free tier for the database for 12 months, but AWS backup storage is not free and I wanted as much as possible with one provider and within the same virtual private network (VPC).

I was back to needing my own backup solution. The new project I am working on uses Docker to run the main service. My Droplet (that’s what Digital Ocean calls its Linux server instances) setup up is  minimal: non-root user setup, firewall configuration and Docker install. The DigitalOcean Market Place includes a Docker image so most of that is done for me with a few clicks. I could have also installed Python and configured a backup program to run each evening. I’d also have to install the right version of the PostgreSQL client, which isn’t currently in the default Ubuntu repositories, so is a little involved. As I was already using Docker it made sense to create a new Docker image to install everything and run a Python programme to schedule and perform the backups. Of course some might argue that a whole Ubuntu install and configure in a Docker image is a bit much for one backup scheduler, but once it’s done it’s done and can easily be installed and run elsewhere as many times as is needed.

There are two more decisions to note. My new backup solution will use DigitalOcean spaces, as I’m not bothered about my data being in Amsterdam and I haven’t implemented an email server yet so there are no notification emails. This resulted in me jumping out of bed as soon as I woke each morning to check Spaces to see if the backup had worked, rather than just checking for an email. It took two days to get it all working correctly!


What

I reached for Naked Element’s trusty Python backup program affectionately named Greenback after the arch enemy of Danger Mouse (Green-back up, get it? No, me neither…) but discovered it was too specific and would need some work, but would serve as a great template to start with.

It’s worth nothing that I am a long way from a Python expert. I’m in the ‘reasonable working knowledge with lots of help from Google’ category. The first thing I needed the program to do was create the backup. At this point I was working locally where I had the correct PostgreSQL client installed, db_backup.py:


db_connection_string=os.environ['DATABASE_URL']

class GreenBack:
    def backup(self):    
        datestr = datetime.now().strftime("%d_%m_%Y_%H_%M_%S")
        backup_suffix = ".sql"
        backup_prefix = "backup_"

        destination = backup_prefix + datestr + backup_suffix
        backup_command = 'sh backup_command.sh ' + db_connection_string + ' ' + destination
        subprocess.check_output(backup_command.split(' '))
        return destination

I want to keep anything sensitive out of the code and out of source control, so I’ve brought in the connection string from an environment variable. The method constructs a filename based on the current date and time, calls an external bash script to perform the backup:


# connection string
# destination
pg_dump $1 > $2

and returns the backup file name. Of course for Ubuntu I had to make the bash script executable. Next I needed to push the backup file to Spaces, which means more environment variables:


region=''
access_key=os.environ['SPACES_KEY']
secret_access_key=os.environ['SPACES_SECRET']
bucket_url=os.environ['SPACES_URL']
backup_folder='dbbackups'
bucket_name='findmytea'

So that the program can access Spaces and another method:

class GreenBack:
    ...
    def archive(self, destination):
        session = boto3.session.Session()
        client = session.client('s3',
                                region_name=region,
                                endpoint_url=bucket_url,
                                aws_access_key_id=access_key,
                                aws_secret_access_key=secret_access_key)

        client.upload_file(destination, bucket_name, backup_folder + '/' + destination)
        os.remove(destination) 

It’s worth noting that DigitalOcean implemented the Spaces API to match the AWS S3 API so that the same tools can be used. The archive method creates a session and pushes the backup file to Spaces and then deletes it from the local file system. This is for reasons of disk space and security. A future enhancement to Greenback would be to automatically remove old backups from Spaces after a period of time.


The last thing the Python program needs to do is schedule the backups. A bit of Googling revealed an event loop which can be used to do this:

class GreenBack:
    last_backup_date = ""

    def callback(self, n, loop):
        today = datetime.now().strftime("%Y-%m-%d")
        if self.last_backup_date != today:
            logging.info('Backup started')
            destination = self.backup()
            self.archive(destination)
            
            self.last_backup_date = today
            logging.info('Backup finished')
        loop.call_at(loop.time() + n, self.callback, n, loop)
...

event_loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
try:
    bk = GreenBack()
    bk.callback(60, event_loop)
    event_loop.run_forever()
finally:
    logging.info('closing event loop')
    event_loop.close()

On startup callback is executed. It checks the last_back_date against the current date and if they don’t match it runs the backup and updates the last_backup_date. If the dates do match and after running the backup, the callback method  is added to the event loop with a one minute delay. Calling event_loop.run_forever after the initial callback call means the program will wait forever and the process continues.


Now that I had a Python backup program I needed to create a Dockerfile that would be used to create a Docker image to setup the environment and start the program:


FROM ubuntu:xenial as ubuntu-env
WORKDIR /greenback

RUN apt update
RUN apt -y install python3 wget gnupg sysstat python3-pip

RUN pip3 install --upgrade pip
RUN pip3 install boto3 --upgrade
RUN pip3 install asyncio --upgrade

RUN echo 'deb http://apt.postgresql.org/pub/repos/apt/ xenial-pgdg main' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/pgdg.list
RUN wget https://www.postgresql.org/media/keys/ACCC4CF8.asc
RUN apt-key add ACCC4CF8.asc

RUN apt update
RUN apt -y install postgresql-client-12

COPY db_backup.py ./
COPY backup_command.sh ./

ENTRYPOINT ["python3", "db_backup.py"]

The Dockerfile starts with an Ubuntu image. This is a bare bones, but fully functioning Ubuntu operating system. The Dockerfile then installs Python, its dependencies and the Greenback dependencies. Then it installs the PostgreSQL client, including adding the necessary repositories. Following that it copies the required Greenback files into the image and tells it how to run Greenback.


I like to automate as much as possible so while I did plenty of manual Docker image building, tagging and pushing to the repository during development, I also created a BitBucket Pipeline, which would do the same on every check in:


image: python:3.7.3

pipelines:
  default:
    - step:
          services:
            - docker
          script:
            - IMAGE="findmytea/greenback"
            - TAG=latest
            - docker login --username $DOCKER_USERNAME --password $DOCKER_PASSWORD
            - docker build -t $IMAGE:$TAG .
            - docker push $IMAGE:$TAG

Pipelines, BitBucket’s cloud based Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment feature, is familiar with Python and Docker so it was quite simple to make it log in to Docker Hub, build, tag and push the image. To enable the pipeline all I had to do was add the bitbucket-pipelines.yml file to the root of the repository, checkin, follow the BitBucket pipeline process in the UI to enable it and add then add the build environment variables so the pipeline could log into Docker Hub. I’d already created the image repository in Docker Hub.


The Greenback image shouldn’t change very often and there isn’t a straightforward way of automating the updating of Docker images from Docker Hub, so I wrote a bash script to do it, deploy_greenback:


sudo docker pull findmytea/greenback
sudo docker kill greenback
sudo docker rm greenback
sudo docker run -d --name greenback  --restart always --env-file=.env findmytea/
greenback:latest
sudo docker ps
sudo docker logs -f greenback

Now, with a single command I can fetch the latest Greenback image, stop and remove the currently running image instance, install the new image, list the running images to reassure myself the new instance is running and follow the Greenback logs. When the latest image is run, it is named for easy identification, configured to restart when the Docker service is restarted and told where to read the environment variables from. The environment variables are in a local file called .env:


DATABASE_URL=...
SPACES_KEY=...
SPACES_SECRET=...
SPACES_URL=https://ams3.digitaloceanspaces.com

And that’s it! Greenback is now running in a Docker image instance on the application server and backs up the database to Spaces just after midnight every night.

Finally

While Greenback isn’t a perfect solution, it works, is configurable, a good platform for future enhancements and should require minimal configuration to be used with other projects in the future.

Greenback is checked into a public BitBucket repository and the full code can be found here:

https://bitbucket.org/findmytea/greenback/

The Greenback Docker image is in a public repository on Docker Hub and can be pulled with Docker:

docker pull findmytea/greenback


We'll use TDD to create a Terraform module which builds a Heroku app and deploys a simple React application.

If you'd like to follow along, you'll need the following prerequisites

  • Terraform installed
  • Go 1.14 installed
  • Heroku account - HEROKU_API_KEY added to environment variables.
  • Git installed
  • BitBucket account

This meetup will be via Zoom:- https://zoom.us/j/902141920

Please RSVP here: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/269640463/
Something my first proper girlfriend said to me has stuck with me my entire life as I disagree with it (mostly).  She said that the best way to discover a new band was to see them live first. The reason I disagree is because I get most pleasure from knowing the music I am listening to live - most of the time.

I’m a member of the BloodstockRock Society and their Facebook page is often a place of band discussion. Lots of people there were saying how good Insomniumare, but they didn’t do a great deal for me when I listened to them on Spotify. Then it was early 2020, I hadn’t been to a gig since Shakespears Sisterin November, I fancied a night out and Insomnium were playing in Norwich. So I took a chance….

From the off they were great live and I really enjoyed it. I came to the conclusion that I must like some of their older stuff as it was the new album which hadn’t done much for me. There were lots of things I like, like widdly guitars, metal riffs and blast beats, but what really lets Insomnium down is the vocals. Death metalvocals, to a certain extent, are death metal vocals, but this guy sounded like he was singing a different song in a different band - it’s the same on the album I tried. If the vocals were more suited to the music, like there are with Wintersun, it would be even better. I also learned that Norwich City’s current start player is from the same town in Finland as the band.

The first thing I did this morning was look up which albums the setlist was from an make a list:

  • One for Sorrow
  • Across the Dark
  • Above the Weeping World
  • Shadows of the Dying Sun
  • Heart like a Grave

And then die a little inside at the prices on Amazon and eBay. I think I’ll be playing a lot of Insomnium on Spotify for the time being so I’m ready to enjoy them to the full next time.



.Net Core in Action
by Dustin Metzgar
ISBN-13: 978-1617294273

I still get a fair amount of flack for buying and reading technical books in the 21st Century - almost as much as I get for still buying and listening to CDs. If I was a vinyl loving hipster, it would be different of course…. However, books like .Net Core in Action are a perfect example of why I do it.  I needed to learn what .Net Core was and get a feel for it very quickly and that is what this book allowed me to do.

I’ve been very sceptical of .Net development for a number of years, mostly due to how large I perceived the total cost of ownership and the startup cost to be and the fact that you have to use Windows.  While this was previously true, .Net Core is different and .Net Core in Action made me understand that within the first few pages of the first chapter. It also got me over my prejudice towards Docker by the end of the second chapter.

The first two chapters are as you would expect, an introduction followed by various Hello World examples. Then it gets a bit weird as the book dives into the build system next and then Unit testing (actually, this is good so early) and then two chapters on connecting to relational databases, writing data access layers and ORMs. There’s a sensible chapter on micro services before the weirdness returns with chapters on debugging performance profiling and internationalisation. I can kind of see how the author is trying to show the reader the way different parts of .Net core work on different platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac), but this relatively small volume could have been more concise.




I was honoured and delighted to be asked to judge and present the overall DevelopHERaward once again this year. Everyone says choosing a winner is difficult. It may be a cliche, but that doesn’t change the fact that it is.

When the 13 category winners came across my desk I read through them all and reluctantly got it down to seven. Usually on a first pass I like to have it down to three or four and then all I need to agonise over is the order. Luckily on the second pass I was able to be ruthless and get it down to four.

To make it even more difficult, three of my four fell into three categories I am passionate about:

  • Technical excellence and diversity
  • Automated Testing
  • Practical, visual Agile

And the fourth achieved results for her organisation which just couldn’t be ignored.

So I read and reread and ordered and re-ordered. Made more tea, changed the CD and re-read and re-ordered some more. Eventually it became clear.

Technical excellent and the ability for a software engineer to turn their hand to new technologies is vital. When I started my career there were basically two main programming languages, C++ and Java. C# came along soon after, but most people fell into one camp or another and a few of us crossed over. Now are are many, many more to choose from and lots of young engineers decide to specialise in one and are reluctant to learn and use others. This diminishes us all as an industry. So someone who likes to learn new and different technologies is a jewel in any company’s crown.

The implementation of Agile methodologies in Software Development is extremely important. Software, by its very nature is complex. Only on the most trivial projects does the solution the users need look anything like what they thought they wanted at the beginning. Traditional waterfall approaches to software development do not allow for this. The client requires flexibility and we as software engineers need the flexibility to deliver what they need. Software development is a learning process for both the client and the software engineer. Agile gives us a framework for this. Unlike many of the traditional methods, Agile has the flexibility to be agile itself, giving continuous improvement.

When implementing Agile processes, the practices are often forgotten or neglected and in many ways they are more important. Not least of which is automated testing. The practice of writing code which tests your code and running it at least on every checkin. This gives you a safety net that code you’ve already written isn’t broken by new code you write. And when it is, the tests tell you, they tell you what’s wrong and where it’s wrong.  We need more of this as an industry and that is why I chose Rita Cristina Leitao, an automated software tester from Switch Studios as the overall DevelopHER winner.

I was very surprised and excited and then immediately disappointed to see Shakespere Sisteron the Graham Norton show. They performed Stay, which is their big hit (longest single at number in the UK be a female artist, 8 weeks), but Marcella wasn’t even trying to hit the high notes and it was awful. We decided to go and see them on tour anyway as it was potentially a once in a lifetime experience before they fell out again.

The Ipswich Regent was half empty in the stalls and the circle was closed and oddly there were quite a few security guards - apparently at the request of the band. Encouragingly Shakespear Sister came on on time and they sounded good! As they ploughed through many of their well known songs, new songs and a few older more obscure songs, the vocals were strong from both Marcella and Siobhan.

The rhythm section was incredible.  The drumming was tight, varied and interesting, but what really stood out was the bass. I think part of this was that the player had fantastic bass lines to play, but also oozed talent. It’s really uncommon for a bass player to need to change bass guitars between songs but Clare Kenny swapped frequently. It’s just a shame that the lead guitar player was totally unremarkable and I’ve no idea what the keyboard player was for.

The highlight I, and I imagine many others, had been looking forward to was Stay. It was better than with Graham Norton, but it’s clear that Marcella can not get to the highest notes and live, she doesn’t try. It was still a good performance of a fantastic song.

Would I go and see them again? Probably not, unless I was dragged.
I was pretty sure I had seen Borknagar support Cradle of Filth at the Astoria 2 in the ‘90s. It turns out that was Opeth and Extreme Noise Terror, so I don’t really remember how I got into them now.

Whatever the reason was, I really got into their 2000 album Quintessence. At the time I didn’t really enjoy their previous album, The Archaic Course, much so with the exception of the occasional relisten to Quintessence, Borknagar went by the wayside for me.  That was until ICS Vortex got himself kicked out of Dimmu Borgir for allegedly poor performances, produced a really rather bland and unlistenable solo album called Storm Seeker, and then got back properly with Borknagar.  That’s when things got interesting.

ICS Vortex has an incredible voice. When he joined Dimmu Borgir as bassist and second vocalist in time for Spiritual Black Dimensions, he brought a new dimension (pun intended) to an already amazing band. I’ve played Spiritual Black Dimensions to death since it came out and I think only Death Cult Armageddon is better.

ICS Vortex’s first album back with Borknagar is called Winter Thrice. Loving his voice and being bitterly disappointed with Storm Seeker I bought it desperately hoping for something more and I wasn’t disappointed. It’s an album with a cold feel and lyrical content about winter and the north. I loved it and played it constantly after release and regularly since. It’s progressive black metal which is the musical equivalent to walking through the snow early on a cold crisp morning.

This year Borknagar released a new album called True North. When I’ve loved an album intensely and the band brings out something new I always feel trepidation. Machine Head never bettered Burn My Eyes, WASP never bettered the Crimson Idol. I could go on, but you get the picture. True North is another album about winter and the north. So I ought to have been on safe ground, but then Arch Enemy have pretty much recorded the same album since Doomsday Machine, but never bettered it. They’re all good though.

My first listen to True North was tense, but it didn’t take long for that to dissipate. I had it on daily
play for a few weeks, together with the new albums from Winterfylleth and Opeth. True North was so brilliant I thought it might be even better than Winter Thrice. So cautiously I tried Winter Thrice again, but I wasn’t disappointed to find it was the slightly better album. The brilliant thing is that I now have two similar, but different enough albums I can enjoy again and again and other than Enslaved’s In Times, I haven’t found anything else like it.

I hope they do what Evergrey did with Hymns for the Broken, The Storm Within and The Atlantic and make it a set of three. Cross your fingers for me.

At school I had this friend, Jamie, and he once said to me that he always preferred having a band’s live album to their studio album of the same songs. His example was Queen’s Live Magic. To me, then, this was madness. It didn’t have all the same songs as It’s a Kind of Magic and the production isn’t as good. Let’s face it, unless it’s Pink Floyd, the production of a live album is never as good as in the studio. I avoided live albums for years.

Pink Floyd’s Pulse was the first live album I really got into and then there was nothing until the teenies when live albums from Emperor, Immortal, Arch Enemy, Dimmu Borgir and Blind Guardian got me completely hooked.

The latest live album I’ve bought is ‘The Siege Of Mercia: Live At Bloodstock 2017’ by Winterfylleth. It’s amazing for a number of reasons. I was at Bloodstock, watching the band, when it was recorded. It’s a fantastic performance of of some brilliant songs. It’s got a, atmospheric, synth version of an old track at the end. It’s encouraged me to relisten to their studio albums and enjoy them so much more.

Winterfylleth are a Black Metal band from Manchester. Their lyrics are based around England’s rich culture and heritage.  Some of their album covers and songs depict the Peak District. You’d have thought a song about Mam Tour, a hill in the Peak District, might be a bit boring, but it’s not! Maybe because, being black metal, you can’t really hear the words, but as always the vocal style, heavy guitars and fast drums make for the perfect mix.

I currently have the Siege of Mercia, along with some similar new albums from the likes of Borknager, on my regular daily playlist and it just gets better and better.


What:nor(DEV):biz Big Dinner with Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure

When:7th October, 2019

Where:Norwich City Football Club

How much:£40.99

Book:https://nordevbiz-oct-2019.eventbrite.co.uk

Join the best Norfolk and Norwich tech companies for dinner, while enjoying good food and great company.

Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure

A desire to innovate, with continual reinvestment creating bigger and bolder attractions – this is what our guest speakers have in mammoth (or should I say dinosaur!) proportions.

Owners of award-winning, Roarr! Dinosaur Adventure in Lenwade, Martin and Adam Goymour will be sharing their aspirations to develop this thriving business both in Norfolk and further afield. Not ones to rest on their laurels, they’ve already rebranded and invested millions so they can appeal to a broader market.

In 2018, they won the Best Large Visitor Attraction award in the Norfolk and Suffolk Tourism Awards. With more projects ‘in the pipeline’, their hard work and enthusiasm for innovation and redevelopment are evident.

From advancing their green energy strategy by placing solar panels on their indoor play area to a fossil dig and a steampunk-inspired restaurant in the Victorian walled garden, they are delighting thousands of visitors of all ages in Norfolk’s very own Jurassic Park.

About nor(DEV):biz

The aims of nor(DEV):biz (Norfolk Developers Business) are:

  • to be the go-to group for local businesses requiring a technology solution.
  • to facilitate and increase referrals and collaboration among Norfolk’s tech businesses.
  • to help close the digital skills gap.
  • to facilitate better collaboration between technology businesses and academic institutions.
  • to have a great meal with great company

Tickets prices do include a donation to the nor(DEV): chosen charity of the year, for 2019/2020.

Breakfast: One for the bikers with Matt Leach of Geotekk

When:Tuesday: September 3, 2019 - 7:30am to 8:30pm
Where: The Maids Head Hotel, Tombland, Norwich, NR3 1LB
How much:£13.95
RSVP: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/qqwhznyzmbfb/

Mattwill talk about Geotekk’s product design and fund raising journey and how the company has developed through a belief that anything which serves to reduce stress and worry in everyday lives enables a happier life empowering us to “Live More”.

Matt is co-founder of Geotekk, a company specialising in smart alarms for bikes. Founded in 2015 in response to ever-rising levels of bike theft, Matt and his co-founder James strive to provide customers with freedom and peace of mind by creating an affordable, versatile and best-in-class smart alarm. This alarm would combine and improve the most effective features of other security products into one multi-functional package.


When:04/06/2019 07:30 - 08:30
Where:The Maids Head Hotel, Tombland, Norwich, Norwich
Price: 13.95 GBP
RSVP: https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/qqwhznyzjbgb/


Technological Future – Utopia or Dystopia?

A Norfolk Developers breakfast discussion with Callum Coombesand Fiona Lettice.

Technological innovation allows organisations to do more with less. As well as improving innovation and productivity, new technologies will help us with some of the key challenges ahead – making better use of limited resources like energy and water, mitigating the effects of climate change on food and poverty, disease prevention, and improving healthcare for an ageing population.

Technological innovation has generally been a powerful force for good, creating new jobs and improving salaries. But new technology also threatens jobs and whole industries, with devastating consequences in some communities and with the benefits unevenly distributed. So is the future utopian or dystopian?

Whichever, technological change will continue, so If we are to realise the potential of new technologies, like artificial intelligence and machine learning, we will need responsible innovation approaches and new regulatory frameworks.

We will need to develop future technologies using multidisciplinary perspectives and methods so that we better consider the future of work, protect our privacy and data, build consumer trust, and respond effectively to ethical and safety issues.

Norfolk Developers are facilitating this by bringing together its members and speakers to debate and shape a healthier technological future.

Breakfast with Norman Wilson: Size matters! Why size determines everything...

When: Tuesday, 12th March @ 7.30am to 8.30am
Where: The Maids Head Hotel, Tombland, Norwich, NR3 1LB
How much:£13.95
RSVP:https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/qqwhznyzfbhb/

Size matters! Why size determines everything in your organisation.
Norman Wilson

An anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist, Dunbar's fame largely focuses around a single number, 150. The theory of Dunbar's Number posits that 150 is the number of individuals with whom any one person can maintain stable relationships.



Join us for the process sessions at nor(DEV):con 2019on Friday 22nd and Saturday 23rd of February in Norwich!

Get your Early Bird tickets herebefore they finish on Friday!


# Evolution from #NoProjects to Continuous Digital

Allan Kelley

Once upon a time there was IT, and IT departments had projects. Projects were always a bad fit for software development but somehow we made them work. As IT became Agile the damage caused by the project model became obvious and #NoProjects emerged to help teams go beyond projects.

Today growth businesses are digital. Technology is the business and the business is technology. Projects end but do you want your business to end? Or do you want it to grow? Growing a digital business means growing software technology.

In this presentation Allan Kelly will look at how #NoProjects came about, how it evolved into Continuous Digital and why it is the future of management.


Miscellaneous Process Tips
Jon Jagger

This session will explore three important process laws.

1. The New Law.
Why does nothing new ever work?

2. The Chatelier’s Principle.
How do systems change? How do they stay the same?

3. The Composition Fallacy.
No difference plus no difference equals no difference is a fallacy. Why?


Jugaad: Bringing Troubled Projects Back On Track
Giovanni Asproni

What do you do when a project is not going well—e.g., the client is upset, the team demoralized, the quality of the product is low, the project is late—to bring it back under control and make the client and the team happy again?

How do you that in highly politically charged environments?

In this talk I’ll answers the questions above and more, by sharing my experience in doing that in several projects of various sizes (from small to quite big) using some jugaad—a Hindi word, which, roughly, means thinking in a frugal way and being flexible, which, in turn, requires the ability to adapt quickly to often unforeseen situations and uncertain circumstances in an intelligent way.

I’ll describe, among other things, how to:

  • Work in highly politically charged environments
  • Deal with difficult (and powerful) people and speak truth to them
  • Help the teams to improve their morale and motivation
  • Make progress with limited resources
  • Use different leadership stiles (including command and control)
  • Make your client happier
  • Deal with serious mistakes


Bug-First Development – Agile Software Development For User Story Prospecting
Adrian Pickering

The idea behind bug-first or bug-driven development is devilishly simply: Everything is a bug until it isn’t.

As far as a user is concerned, there is essentially no difference between a bug, a feature that hasn’t been delivered and one that is otherwise unusable, say through substandard user interface or user experience. Bug-driven development essentially asks the user what operation they want to do next that they currently can’t undertake. The benefit this brings is laser-focused story discovery and prioritisation.


Working remote vs Working colocated
Paul Boocock

We often talk about waterfall, scrum, agile and many other processes but these are often considered from a colocated perspective.

As demand for remote working continues to increase, we will discuss if our usual processes work in a remote environment and what changes or considerations do we need to make to support remote workers?


One Team, Two Teams, Many Teams: Scaling Up Done Right (90 or 45 minutes, 90 preferred)
Giovanni Asproni

Scaling up software projects is one of the trends of the moment—many companies, big and small, try to do that  to increase the speed of delivery of their projects.

However, scaling up can be quite difficult (even going only from one to two teams),  especially if it is done focusing on the wrong aspects – most companies give too much weight to formal structures and processes (e.g., mandating the use of SAFe, LESS or other frameworks), and not enough weight to other aspects that would give a bigger bang for the buck: eg removing friction, improving communication channels, setting clear goals, delegating responsibility and accountability, etc.

In this session I’ll share my experience in successfully helping companies to do the right thing in projects ranging from two to about eighty teams, and I’ll offer some tools that you will be able to use right away in your projects.

The session, among other things, includes:

  • A description of what needs to be done right before scaling up
  • Strategies on how to decide when to add new people to a team and new teams to a project
  • Things to consider when deciding the structure of the teams (eg feature vs component teams), and its relationship with the shape of the system
  • How to use simple rules to allow teams to collaborate productively
  • An explanation on why each project has a upper bound in its ability to scale, and what to do about it


Reengineering a Library
Burkhard Kloss

Session abstract: Over the last few years, I’ve been consulting on reengineering a quant library. As is wont, the library had originally accreted, rather than been designed; eventually, it had turned into a ball of mud, and maintenance was becoming increasingly problematic. We decided to rewrite the library from scratch, using best practices as we understood them, and eventually turned it into a piece of code we can be proud of – and maintain and extend without too much pain.

This talk is a personal retrospective on techniques and processed we applied; what worked, what did not, and why.


Get your tickets now: http://nordevcon-2019.eventbrite.com


Join us for the nor(DEV):con 2019Business Sessions on Friday 22nd February!

Get your Early Bird tickets here before the price goes up after Friday!

Running a business is hard

John Gostling

Running a business is hard….harder when you don’t have much experience of running a business! 6 years ago I joined Breakwater IT as a Systems Engineer, I quickly realised there was so much potential that had yet to be tapped into, and every day since then my focus has been on releasing this, creating a better company to work with, and to work for. It’s been a constantly evolving journey, 2 steps forward, one step back (sometimes two!), but things are finally starting to fall into place.

This is a very open self-appraisal of the how we have transformed a loss making company into one that turns a profit and is currently growing at 20% year on year.


Crack the motivation code!

Cassandra Andrews

Imagine if you knew precisely what motivated each member of your team, how motivated they were and what you could do to improve their motivation! 

Cassandra Andrews interactive workshop focuses on motivation in the workplace and introduces ‘motivational maps’, an incredibly accurate and user-friendly tool which enables us to unlock and measure employee motivation.

Understanding exactly what motivates individuals in an organisation can be used with significant impact to support business growth and profitability by maximising employee and team motivation, retain employees and recruit the right people to complement existing teams.

At the workshop you will discover how to create high performing teams by learning:

What motivation is, how it can be measured and how it impacts the workforce.
About the nine motivators identified in motivational maps.
How to increase team performance by identifying conflicts in motivation.

To enable all delegates to get their own ‘wow’ moment from the workshop, there will be an opportunity for four attendees to win a complimentary individual motivational map with feedback/insight session and discounted motivational maps available for other attendees.


Developing an app to promote emotional resilience

UEA

Since summer 2017, Dr Laura Biggart and Dr Kamena Henshaw, from the School of Psychology, have been working with UEA computer science students and Steve Jones and Adam Ziolkowski from JoziTech to develop a student support app. Currently the app is focused on supporting students’ transition into Higher Education. In this session we will talk about the development of the app, the research background to the features, and the feedback since our launch in September 2018. We will conclude with a discussion of our future plans, including evaluation of the app and our plans to work with other organisations to develop bespoke OpenUp apps


Don’t fall over like Elon Musk did – How to stay energised and disrupt an industry

Ian Hacon

Elon Musk is one of the most famous workaholic cases in recent years. So much so, many others quoted him as a badge of honour when they too worked too hard. In 2018, his wheel fell off, forced to take a total break due to exhaustion. This session will help you understand how looking after your own energy is good for business and you will leave with some easily implementable steps to do so.


Orchestrated Mobility – Changing The Way We Move

John Fagan

By late 2030, its predicted that 95% U.S. passenger miles travelled will be served by on-demand vehicles owned by fleets, not individuals, in a new business model Transport-as-a-Service (TaaS).

Citizens will pay a monthly fee to go anywhere they wish, much like we do today using on demand services for music and video, like Spotify and Netflix.

TaaS will unify public, private & autonomous transportation into an efficient service and is predicted to deliver a largely carbon-free road transportation system.

In this talk i will…

Vision of Transport as a Service

Key Drivers (Technologies, Autonomous electric vehicles, ride sharing, costs and barriers)
Impacts on society, economics and the environment
Who should be the Netflix for Transport?
Examples of use cases and disruption happening today


Harnessing the power of subscription technology

Juliana Meyer

Thousands of professionals are discovering ways to transform the way they work and the way they earn a living. Leveraging the skills we each have, the talk uncovers how anyone can can build their own subscription business using the knowledge and talents they already have.

I’ll go deep into the steps needed, opportunities available, the how and why, and what has worked and not worked for others. This has already been a game changer for others who learnt this from my previous talks which then transformed their lives, their living, and their opportunities.

Given the key trends of subscription, technology and self-education, I’ll explore and explain how anyone can successfully launch their own apps from home to generate a passive income and lift the lid on exchanging time for money.


Get your tickets here: http://nordevcon-2019.eventbrite.com
Revenger
Alastair Reynolds
ISBN-13: 978-0575090552

Alastair Reynolds is on form with this steampunk meets pirates space opera.

The story is cliched and almost totally predictable, but very enjoyable at the same time. I’ve started wondering a lot recently, if they body count in such stories is worth the life of the person who is being rescued and I think that remains to be seen in the sequel.

Fura Ness is extremely driven and I struggled to understand a lot of her decisions.

As with much of Reynolds’ work, there is no explanation for why this universe is the way it is and it feels as strange as when the clock strikes 13 in 1984, but makes me want to read more in the hope of understanding.

While most of the story is linear and complete, there’s a large chunk towards the end which feels missing. The climax is a little brief and just like in terminal world there is suddenly a lot of new plot in the final chapter.

Where the story goes next will very interesting.

nor(DEV):con 2019

Thursday 21st to Saturday 23rd of February 2019

The Kings Centre, Norwich, NR1 1PH

nordevcon.com

Tickets: http://nordevcon-2019.eventbrite.com

Friday opening keynote: The Failure of Focus

Liz Keogh

We know that in our landscape of people and technology, aiming for a particular outcome doesn’t always lead to us getting what we want. Sometimes the best results come from approaching a problem obliquely. But in Agile our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through the early and continuous delivery of valuable software. We like to start with the outcome, meet the needs of our users, delivering high-quality working software with happy teams and true agility… but how might that focus be holding us back, and what are the alternatives?

In this talk we look at some different strategies for approaching complex ecosystems, starting from where we are right now, and allowing innovation to emerge through obliquity, naivety, and serendipity.

Friday closing keynote: Software doesn't always work out. 

Kevlin Henney

Looking at the number of software failure screens in public places, it can sometimes seem that software developers are the greatest producers of installation art around the planet. Software failures can be entertaining or disastrous. They can also be instructive — there's a lot we can learn.

Saturday keynote: Plain Wrong?

Heydon Pickering

I love writing JavaScript. The trouble is, so does everyone else. When people aren’t writing JavaScript, they’re usually writing frameworks for writing JavaScript in JavaScript. In fact, most of the JavaScript that’s around these days seems to either be written for, or within, a JavaScript flavor like React, Vue, or Angular. Frameworks make writing your own code faster and more ergonomic, but they do not come without problems. Code written with Framework A depends on the environment Framework A provides in order to work — and this dependency often represents a lot of code to transmit, decompress, parse, and compile. What about ‘plain’ JavaScript? Is it always naïve to think anything worthwhile can still be achieved just writing some straight-up code? It turns out this is a tricky question to answer, because the line between plain and flavored JavaScript is kind of blurry. It’s also not clear who should be the ones to get to write JavaScript, for what reasons, or when. But there’s no doubt the little we do as web developers is often done with much more than we 

See the full schedule here: nordevcon.com


A couple of weeks ago I was honoured to be asked to judge and present the overall winner of the DevelopHER Awards2018. There are a number of categories in the awards, including TechStar which I also judged, and the overall winner is chosen from the winners of the other categories.

I believe that the best developers start writing code at an early age and continue throughout their lives and on through their careers. As well as learning all they can, all the time, they give back to community around them and help other people develop as well.

Federica Freddi, who also won the Emerging Talent award, is clearly passionate about software development and is fully deserving of the DevelopHER award and I couldn’t have been more delighted to be able to present her with it on the night.

Federica told me "It is fantastic to see so many women recognised for their contribution to our industry. It is a huge honour for me to be able to represent so many talented people that are making the difference in tech. As an Emerging Talent, I still have a long way ahead and I don’t know what awaits for me in the future, however I am sure I will never forget to stop along the way to give back to people and help the next generations of tech stars to grow too."

I am hoping we’ll see Federica back in Norwich very soon.

In this video I explain what we do at nor(DEV)and why we do it.
Sync The Cityis an annual event that brings together budding entrepreneurs and developers to pitch and build a start-up in just 54 hours. This year Naked Element's Director Paul Grenyer was a mentor for one of the teams and they had great success with their idea ‘Seren’, taking home one of the prizes!

Paul says “John Fagan has asked me to be involved with every Sync the City since it started five years ago, but this is the first time I've been in a position to commit to the 2.5 day event. Originally I was providing technical support via nor(DEV):but Sync the City were short of mentors so I was embedded into team Seren. I had to put my work for Naked Element on hold but I was more than happy to do so to be part of the event. My only regret is that I wasn't able to do it sooner!”

Lily Beel, a trainee solicitor at Leathes Prior, explains the idea behind her winning pitch, saying “the general idea was to connect those beginning to suffer from mental health conditions with those who have recovered/are in recovery. The waiting time to be seen through the NHS is 9 months for mild/moderate conditions - which means that people are likely to get worse during that period. If they had someone to talk to, who had been through similar mental health issues, it might stop them from reaching a crisis point and harming themselves or worse.”

“I pitched it by providing figures received from different organisations about mental health and how long it takes to be seen. I explained that it would be good to have venues which allow people to connect and chat (whether about their mental health directly or about other subjects)”

Lily and the team of eight worked together under Paul’s mentorship, to build the business start-up, but the process was not without its obstacles. “It was particularly difficult to work out how to reach those suffering and how to fund the charity. We overcame this hurdle using research and speaking to people. Contacts are invaluable - as you are limited to 54 hours, you need all the help you can get!”

But this wasn’t the hardest part of the process, as Lily had never taken part in Sync the City before, let alone made a business pitch, she found the idea of doing this in front of everyone a daunting prospect. “I wanted to make sure I got the point across as I feel really passionately about mental health and feel that more needs to be done - it was hard to keep my emotions in check when I was pitching. We had a performance workshop beforehand and my team were incredibly supportive, which really helped.”

“When we came out of the workshop with the performance coach” Paul adds, “I was really pumped up, as I knew Lily had something special and the drive and talent she exhibited had the potential to go a long way.”

Between Lily, her amazing team and the support of Paul and all the other mentors and experts, team Seren took home the People’s Choice prize and £1000 between them! Paul says “I put winning down to the amazing drive and determination of Lily BeeI and to listening to the other mentors and following their advice.”

“Sync The City is so important to Norwich and the tech community for so many reasons,  but mostly because it helps get new ideas off the ground and is great for the tech community, especially the collaboration with the UEA which brings so many business and computer science students to the event.”

Join one of our interactive workshops at nor(DEV):con 2019on Thursday 21st of February from 9am, Get your tickets here: http://nordevcon-2019.eventbrite.com

Crack the motivation code! - Cassandra Andrews

Imagine if you knew precisely what motivated each member of your team, how motivated they were and what you could do to improve their motivation!
Cassandra Andrews interactive workshop focuses on motivation in the workplace and introduces ‘motivational maps’, an incredibly accurate and user-friendly tool which enables us to unlock and measure employee motivation.

Understanding exactly what motivates individuals in an organisation can be used with significant impact to support business growth and profitability by maximising employee and team motivation, retain employees and recruit the right people to complement existing teams.

At the workshop you will discover how to create high performing teams by learning:

  • What motivation is, how it can be measured and how it impacts the workforce.
  • About the nine motivators identified in motivational maps.
  • How to increase team performance by identifying conflicts in motivation.

To enable all delegates to get their own ‘wow’ moment from the session, when you register for this event you will receive a complimentary motivational map (worth £150) for completion prior to the event.


Day of Deliberate Practice - Jon Jagger.

During the session we will discuss and practice software craftsmanship, communication and creativity, focusing on TDD, pair programming, trying out new things and revisiting old ones. Deliberate practice involves careful repetition and reflection to master, explore and understand a technique, to know its boundaries, to make it second nature.

  • Hands on workshops & lectures
  • Shared Learning Environment
  • Effective coding habits
  • Collaborative Development

If you code every day, keep in mind that a change is as good as a rest — yes, there will be coding, but it’s not your workaday coding. We will be using cyber-dojo, an innovative, collaborative, open source environment. We are going to have fun — join us!

  • Test Driven Development – TDD
  • Pair & Mob Programming
  • Cyber-dojo

With time to look at different code, and code differently, this session will open your mind to different ways of doing things and new ways of approaching old problems with great rewards. Using Jon Jagger’s innovative cyber-dojo environment, you will get to re-examine coding habits and debate modern practices with experts and peers.

This session is open to individuals and teams of all abilities, the only pre-requisite is some experience of software development and a desire to learn:

  • All programmers who want to step back and examine how they can be better
  • Junior programmers who are looking to master their craft
  • Experienced developers who want to reflect on their own practices and hone their skills

Bring a laptop – wifi and access to http://cyber-dojo.org/required.


Real time analysis of streaming data with Hadoop and Druid - Tom Barber

In this workshop we will build and deploy a Hadoop cluster along with Apache Druid which is an analytical database designed for high volume time series data. We will then work with the attendees to stream data into Druid, process that data and return it for real time analysis. This type of workflow is useful for log file analysis, intrusion detection, sensor analysis or similar and very relevant to businesses of today. All of the software used is open source and free to deploy, attendees will leave with a high level understanding of the various technologies used and a framework that can be deployed quickly and easily in the real world.

Level: Intermediate


Deep Tech sounds like a character from the X-Files right? While it’s not a covert government agency, Deep Tech is affecting people’s lives without them even knowing it, but it’s not something we need to be afraid of. There are lots of very technical and wordy definitions of Deep Tech, but essentially it means technology that has an engineering aspect while having a demonstrable impact on people’s daily lives. Rather than a disruptive technology, like AirBnB or Deliveroo – apps that alter a service that already existed – a Deep Tech breakthrough could use technology to cure cancer or expand space travel. AirBnB is an intangible app, while Deep Tech often involves robots or breakthroughs in scientific or medical equipment.

Good examples are artificial wombs to increase the survival chances of premature babies, or brain implants to improve the independence of stroke victims. It’s not just medical advancements that are benefitting from Deep Tech, but improvements to smart homes and cleaner cities as well as energy efficiency are all developing areas of Deep Tech. Self driving cars and lithium-ion batteries could vastly improve the environment and how we live in it and are both examples of Deep Tech. Since

2015 European investment in Deep Tech has been growing three times faster than B2C investments (Wavestone) and it’s easy to see why when the impact that technology of this kind can have is made clear. Rather than just making it easier for people to order the weekly shop, or interact with a video on social media, discoveries in the Deep Tech arena make fundamental changes to how we live and survive. Researchers and scientists working in Deep Tech have not only created machines that can replicate human actions, but improve them. Like something from a science fiction movie, ‘HoloEyes’ are goggles that can provide a surgeon with a patient’s anatomy before the first incision is made, right there in the operating room. Harvard scientists have gone one further into the science fiction realm and created a brand new material, never before seen on earth. Metallic hydrogen was formed after 45 years of research and tests and has enormous potential, from space travel to superconducting abilities.

Deep Tech is technology at its most advanced and it’s most useful. While it may not affect all of us at once, the advancements being made in this field have a huge impact that will influence and hopefully improve daily life on a global scale.

Talk to me about Deep Tech.


Event: nor(DEV), TechEast & Barclays Eagle Lab present the digital technology showcase

When:Monday, 29th October @ 6.30pm

Where:The King's Centre, King Street, Norwich, NR1 1PH

RSVP:https://www.meetup.com/Norfolk-Developers-NorDev/events/252875683/

Ever thought that technology could help your business but weren’t sure how?

Have you wanted to talk to experts about the advantages of business software but were afraid of being given a hard sell?

Do you have questions about software and technology but were unsure who to ask?

Our Technology Showcase is here to help! Norfolk Developers, along with TechEast and the Barclays Eagle Lab Norwich have put together an evening of talks and introductions to help companies access technology firms on an informal basis. No sales pitches, no pushy sales people, just information and introductions.

The evening will be free from complicated jargon and tech-speak and questions are actively encouraged! This is an evening designed for people who run businesses, not IT experts.

The Technology Showcase is your chance to understand the advantages that technology can offer your business, and an opportunity to pick the brains of the regions best software companies, without obligation.

The evening will begin with introductions to Norwich’s supportive tech community, who offer support, workshops and discussions to novices and experts alike.


  • SynchNorwich help promote startups and enable local tech businesses to grow.
  • DevelopHER promote equality in technology and host the successful DevelopHER awards, recognising women in technology.
  • Norfolk Developers
Источник: https://www.artificialworlds.net/planetcode/author/paul-grenyer/