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1 Michael Pacholok Chief Purchasing Officer r Purchasing and Materials Management Division City Hall, 18 th Floor, West Tower 100 Queen Street West Toronto, Ontario M5H 2N2 Joanne Kehoe, Manager Construction Services September 17, 2018 Posted on website: (382 pages) ADDENDUM NO. 1 TENDER NO REVISED CLOSING: 12:00 NOON (Local Time), Sept. 26, 2018 RE: Moorevale Park Clubhouse State of Good Repair Renovations Please refer to the above Tender Call document in your possession and be advised of the following: I. REVISIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 1.0 The closing date is revised from Sept.19, 2018 at 12:00 PM (Local Time) to Sept.26, 2018 at 12:00 PM (LOCAL TIME). Exterior 1.1 For the existing ramp number 4 - Fully remove the northern part of the ramp, (approximately 6 ), from the existing cracked location of the ramp to the bottom of the ramp at the asphalt paving, include for removal of existing substrate and replace with 4 thick compacted granular substrate. Minimum thickness of the concrete ramp shall be 4 (including at the northern perimeter edges). -Remove top 2 of the existing surface concrete from the remaining ramp areas (including all exposed surfaces including top and sides of the ramp). -Clean and prepare existing concrete surfaces for placement of new concrete repair materials. -Install concrete formwork to form the perimeter sides of the ramp as required. -Include for installation of welded wire mesh, 6x6 6/6 WWM, (Can/CSA A ) reinforcement for ramp areas. -Supply and install new Hilti-HY200 dowels between existing concrete ramp and new repair areas near the north end of the ramp. Dowel spacing shall o/c and 15M in size and installed as per Manufacturer s requirements. -Apply bonding agent to bond the new concrete to the old concrete slab such as Sika Dur-32 Normal as per Manufacturer s requirements. -New concrete ramp should be built according to Structural drawing SO3. -Concrete repair materials shall be in accordance to CSA A New concrete repair materials shall be C-1 class exposure, 6-8% air entrained, min. 35MPa compressive strength at 28 days, and 13mm max aggregate size. Concrete finish shall be broomed finish. -Include for soft and hard landscaping repairs adjacent to the repair areas to match existing All of the exposed existing brick foundation walls, (excluded the basement foundation wall, - for basement wall repair refer to A5.01 detail 3), should be repaired as per detail 5, Architectural drawing A5.02. Minimum 2 deep rigid insulation from existing exterior ground 1.3- Refer to Architectural drawing A A5.01-A5.02, (not reissued) All exterior brick revised cement parging to Sikacrete-204 Parging or approved equivalents. 1.4 Architectural Drawing A3.00 New Construction Work Ground Floor; Add the following to Notes: 2) Existing fire separations are to be maintained, any and all penetrations, gaps, openings, etc. through fire separations are to be fire stopped and made good, typical.

2 Interior 1.5- Drawing A 3.00, (not reissued) the west wall at the permit areas and tennis club should be changed from WA-04 to WA Basement Wall; - Refer to Arch. Dwg. A2.00 detail 2, A5.00, A5.01(not reissued) add the following note Basement interior walls to be thoroughly cleaned & prepared, apply crystalline waterproofing compound to inner surface walls and make good typical refer to Spec Section Basement floor; - Clean & prep. Surfaces - repair floor cracks - apply concrete floor sealer on floor refer to specification section Concrete Floor Sealer 1.8- Basement stairs - Stair risers and treads to be repaired, painted and made good, typical (include replacement of 3 steps) - repair and repaint hand rails - paint stair walls and ceiling 1.9 Refer to Electrical Addendum E-1Drawing E-3, (not reissued), revise Basement and Ground Floor Proposed Lighting Layout notes as per attached sketch ESK Refer to Specification Section Excavating Backfilling, (not reissued) Compacting Part 1 General, item 1.7 Removal of water, third paragraph, Provide for such excavation dewatering using a qualified consultant with competent personnel, and electrical connections. Delete a qualified consultant form the above sentence The Architectural specifications are to be deleted and replaced with the following attached amended specifications, which have the corrected specification titles and section numbers. Specification Section Preformed Metal Siding has been deleted. Specification Section Miscellaneous Metals Part 2 Products item List of Miscellaneous Metals: delete item.2 Bench Supports replace with.2 Locker supports, anchors, etc. delete item.6 Folding partition supports replace with.6 Security Screens Refer to Arch. Dwg. A1.00; NEW PREFABRICATED 10 X10 WOOD STORAGE SHED (not reissued) (C/W LIFETIME WARRANTY), & STEEL STRUCTURE REINFORCED CONSTRUCTION. COLOUR: TO BE DECIDED LATER BY CONSULTANT MATERIAL: UV PROTECTED, PAINTED WOOD C/W ANTI-GRAFITTI COATING ROOF: GAVALUME GABLE ROOF WITH GLAVANIZED STEEL SUPPORTING STRUCTURE WALL: DOUBLE WALL DOOR: PREPAINTED HM DOOR & FRAME C/W PADLOCKKEYED TO CITY STANDARDS Delete & STEEL STRUCTURE REINFORCED CONSTRUCTION ; Delete GAVALUME GABLE ROOF WITH GALVANIZED STEEL SUPPORTING STRUCUTRE replace with ASHPHALT SHINGLES ON WOOD GABLE ROOF STRUCTURE Delete HM PREPAINTED DOOR & FRAME replace with PREPAINTED 68 WX80 H STEEL DOORS WITH POLYTEX COATING (OR SIMILAR APROVED COATING) Add 2 CIRCULAR WOOD VENTS. Acceptable manufacturer; Summerwood Products or Consultant approved equivalent

3 II. ADDITIONS 2.1-The following specification sections are hereby added, (contained in the revised Architectural Specification); Concrete Floor Sealer Crystalline Waterproofing Coatings Flush Wood Doors Clad Wood Windows Aluminum Clad Wood Doors The DSS report by Safetech Environmental Ltd., dated July 5 is hereby added to form part of the Contract. Note, the Contractor is responsible for the abatement and removal of all hazardous materials which is affected by the Work. 2.3 Architectural SK-1 New window Security Screens which is added to drawing A7.00 as detail 9/A7.00 III. QUESTIONS Q1 Re: Wood Doors - Please provide specification for wood doors shown on door schedule. A1 Refer to above -II Additions1.7 added Specifications Sections & Q2 Kindly confirm that all existing furniture & equipment shall be removed by the owner before starting our works. If not, please provide the list and details. A2 All are to be removed prior to the start of Construction by the User Groups. Q3 Please provide the details of the cash allowance. A3 Refer to line 15 of the bid form the $15, cash allowance is for door hardware and testing. Q4 Kindly confirm the start & completion date of the project. A4 - Nov 1 to May 1 Q5 Kindly provide the asbestos / abatement report for the building. A5 refer to 2.2 above the DSS report by Safetech Environmental Ltd., dated July 5, is attached. Q6 With reference to the specification Table of Contents, Section Preformed Metal Siding, kindly provide details and scope. A6 There is no preformed metal siding except for flashing, etc. refer to item 1.11 revised Architectural Specifications Q7 Please provide specs foe the new baby change station as mentioned at drawing A3.00. A7 Refer to Washroom Accessories Specification Section 10800, Part 2 Products; 2.4 DIAPER CHANGE STATION: General Description: pull down, wall mounted diaper change station Acceptable Products: Koala KB200 (white) classic horizontal baby changing station or Surface mounted baby change station #9012 by American Specialties or approved equivalent Q8 With reference to section Miscellaneous Metal, list includes Benches support, perforated woven wire screen panel & Folding partition support with addition to others. Please advise location and scope details.

4 A8 Existing window security screens are to be retained, cleaned, repaired, prepped and repainted. New Windows are to be provided with new security screens consisting of steel rod woven wire mesh and painted to match existing security screens, refer to detail 6/ A7.00. There are no benches in the scope of work. Handrails and guardrails should be included under the scope of work all are to be galvanized. Q9 could you provide specification and info for the storage shed on concrete slab? (ref to drawing A1.00) A9 Refer to 1.12 above for prefabricated 10 x10 wood shed on drawings A1.00 Q10 Could you provide quantity of Damaged Areas of Wood Siding To Be Removed & Replaced with New to Match Existing A10 Refer to Dwg. Elevations note 2 Allow for 30% of total siding area to be replaced. Q11 I have noticed that the notes from demolition drawing (E-2) have been copied/pasted to new lighting layout drawing (E-3) Please let me know if there is additional notes for lighting layout drawing (E-3) A11 Refer to 1.9 above. Q12 According the specification (page 153, Section ), Please clarify, dewatering is a part of contract? How deep the water table? Do we need to install sum pit with Pump in the basement? A12 Refer to 1.10 above, the Contractor is responsible for the removal of any water that may be caused by excavation or other means during construction. Should you have any questions regarding this Addendum, contact Martin Suits, Corporate Buyer, at Please attach this addendum to your Request for Tender document and be governed accordingly. Bidders must acknowledge receipt of all Addenda on the space provided on the Tender Call Cover Page as per the Process Terms and Conditions, Section 1, Item 8 - Addenda, of the Tender Call document. All other aspects of the Tender remain the same. Yours truly, Joanne Kehoe Manager, Construction Services Purchasing & Materials Management

5 ARCHITECTURAL SPECIFICATION FOR CITY OF TORONTO PARKS FORESTRY & RECREATION MOOREVALE PARK CLUBHOUSE STATE OF GOOD REPAIR RENOVATIONS 175 MOORE PARK AVE., TORONTO, ONTARIO June 2018

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7 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 2 of Bituminous Damproofing June Crystalline Waterproofing Coatings June Insulation Air/Vapour Barrier June Flashing and Sheet Metal June Firestopping and Smoke Seals June Sealants June Flush Wood Doors June Aluminum Clad Wood Doors June Hollow Metal Door Frames, Panels & June Screens Clad Wood Windows June Automatic Door Equipment June Finishing Hardware June Glazing June Gypsum & Cement Board June Non- Load Bearing Wall Framing June Tiling June Resilient Flooring June Concrete Floor Sealing June Painting June Interior & Exterior Repainting June Graffiti Resistant Coatings June Temporary Scaffolding & Platforms June Solid Plastic Toilet Compartments June Washroom Accessories June Miscellaneous Specialties June Mechanical, Electrical & Structural Specifications: Refer to specifications on drawings and as included above

8 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ABBREVIATIONS Page 1 of 4 USE OF ABBREVIATIONS 1.1 Many words or expressions that are repeated frequently on the Drawings and Schedules are abbreviated to reduce the amount of wording that might obscure the detailing. To avoid misinterpretation, these abbreviations are listed, with their full meaning, in this Section. 1.2 In addition to those noted in Article 1.4, some other abbreviations, commonly used in Specifications, are separately listed, in Article 1.5. Refer also to structural, mechanical and electrical drawings and specifications for other abbreviations used in structural, mechanical and electrical documents. 1.3 Abbreviations listed here may be used in technical Sections of the Specifications. 1.

9 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ABBREVIATIONS Page 2 of 4 EQUIP ES ESB EXH EXIST (E) EXP EXT equipment electric strike exterior stretching bar exhaust existing expansion exterior HVAC HYD INSUL INT INTUM FP heating, ventilation & air conditioning hydrant insulate(d)(ing) interior intumescent fireproof F FAP FBGL FCT FD FDN FEC FFL FG FHC FIN FIXT FL FLUOR FR FRR FSS FTG GALV GC GFA GH GL GR GPWG Gyp. Bd. GWB or GB GRD H HC HD HDH or HDL HHHD HDWD HM HORIZ HR HSS HT refrigerator wood fibre acoustic panels fibreglass folding diaper change table floor drain foundation fire extinguisher cabinet finish(ed) floor level finish(ed) grade fire hose cabinet finish(ed) fixture floor(ing) fluorescent freezer fire resistance rating folding shower seat footing galvanized General Contractor gross floor area glass handrail glass, glazing grommet Georgian Polished Wire Glass Gypsum Board gypsum wallboard gridline high hollow core electric hand dryer electric hair dryer electric hand-held hair dryer hardwood hollow metal horizontal hour hollow structural section height JAN JT KP L LG LIN L/S M,m MAS MANUF MAX MECH MED MEL MET MIN MINS MH ML MM,mm MO MTD MTL MW (N) NBC NFPA NIC NO.,# NTS OA OBC OC OH OPNG OWG OWSJ janitorial joint key pad angle long linear light standard metre(s) masonry manufacture maximum mechanical medium melamine metal minimum minutes manhole magnetic lock millimetre(s) masonry opening mounted material microwave oven new National Building Code National Fire Protection Association not in contract number not to scale overall Ontario Building Code on centre(s) overhead opening one-way glass open-web steel joist

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11 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ABBREVIATIONS Page 4 of 4 WV (X) water valve existing 1.- END OF SECTION -

12 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 1 of GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1. Unless specified otherwise, the provisions of this Section shall apply to all Sections of the Specifications. 2. Conform to the General Conditions of the Canadian Construction Document 2, 1994, Stipulated Price Contract and the Supplementary General Conditions. 1.2 SUBDIVISION OF WORK 1. The Specifications have generally been divided into trade divisions, and the trade divisions into sections for the purpose of ready reference, but a section may consist of more than one Subcontractor or supplier. The responsibility for determining which Subcontractor or supplier shall provide labour, materials, products, equipment and services to complete the work rests solely with the Contractor. 1.3 STANDARDS AND DEFINITIONS 1. The term Consultant as used in CCDC Document 2, and the term Architect which appears elsewhere in the Bidding Documents, shall be interchangeable, and shall, in both cases, refer to. 2. Where a reference is made to specification standards produced by various organizations, conform to latest edition of standards as amended and revised to date of Contract. 3. Wherever the words acceptable, approved, approved as equal, satisfactory, directed, submit, selected, or similar words or phrases are used in standards or elsewhere in the Contract Documents, it shall be understood that they mean, unless the context provides otherwise, acceptable to the Consultant:, approved by the Consultant:, approved as equal by the Consultant, satisfactory to the Consultant, directed by the Consultant, submit to the Consultant, selected by the Consultant. 4. The only means by which something shown or specified shall be indicated as not being in the Contract is by the initials NIC, or words Not in Contract, By Owner, or By Other Contractor. 5. Where the word Provide occurs, it shall be interpreted to mean Furnish all labour, products, materials, and equipment necessary to install. 1.4 TENDER DOCUMENTS 1. Study all Contract Documents to determine work required by all Sections, and the inter-dependency of each Section. 2. Questions arising as to the meaning or intent of the Contract Documents shall be asked at the time of tendering. They shall be submitted to the Consultant in writing, and answers, in written form, will be issued by the Consultant. 3. Bidders are advised that all conditions are not portrayed on Drawings. It is the responsibility of Bidders to fully determine the scope of the work through examination of the Site.

13 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 2 of The Contract Documents have been arranged into various divisions, sections, drawings, and schedules for the purpose of presenting the Work in a logical and organized form and to enable ease of reference and interpretation, and are not intended to be an arrangement of precise and independent Subcontractors, or jurisdiction of responsibility for the various parts of the Work. The Contractor shall be solely responsible for coordinating the execution of the Work of this Contract in accordance with the requirements of the Contract Documents. 5. As a result the Consultant shall not be required to decide on questions arising with regard to agreements or contracts between the Contractor and Subcontractors r Suppliers, nor to the extent of the parts of the Work assigned thereto. 6. Further no extra will be allowed as a result of the failure to coordinate and allocate the Work such that the Work is Provided in accordance with the Contract Documents. 1.5 LAWS, NOTICES, PERMITS AND FEES 1. The building Code shall govern the Work. 2. Comply with codes, by-laws and regulations of authorities having jurisdiction over the Place of the Work. Codes and regulations form an integral part of the Contract Documents. 3. The Owner shall apply and pay for the building Permit. The Contractor shall pick up the building Permit from the Municipal department having jurisdiction at the Place of Work. Obtain and pay for all other permits, licences, deposits and certificates of inspection as part of the Work. 4. Arrange for inspection, testing and acceptance of the Work required by the authorities having jurisdiction. Be responsible for necessary preparations, provisions and pay costs. 5. It is the responsibility of the Contractor to schedule notifications and inspections required by the authorities having jurisdiction such that notifications can be properly received and that inspections can be properly undertaken without causing a delay in the Work. The Contractor at no additional cost to the Owner, shall be responsible for any delay in the Work caused by failure to properly schedule required notifications and inspections. 6. The Contractor shall provide to the chief building official or the registered code agency where a registered code agency is appointed under the Ontario Building Code Act in respect of the construction to which the notice relates, the required notices as set out in division C- Part 1 Sentence (2) and Sentence of the O.B.C., O. Reg. 350/06 as amended. The Contractor shall be present at each site inspection by an inspector or registered code agency as applicable under division C Part1 Sentence of the building code..1 It is the responsibility of the Contractor to schedule notifications to the chief building official or the registered code agency where a registered code agency such that the inspection pertaining to the notifications can be made within the time frame as required under Division C- Part 1 Sentence of the Ontario Building Code, O Reg. 350/06 as amended, without causing a delay in the Work. The Contractor at no additional cost to the Owner, shall be solely responsible for any delay in the Work caused by the failure to properly schedule required notifications and inspections.

14 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 3 of QUANTITY OF ITEMS 1. Where a component, device, item or part of materials or equipment is referred to in the singular number, such reference shall require the provision of as many components, devices items or parts of materials or equipment necessary to complete the Work. 1.7 STANDARDS AND CODES 1. Contract forms, codes, specifications, standards, manuals and installation, application and maintenance instructions referred to in these specifications, unless otherwise specified, amended or date suffixed shall be the latest published editions a t Contract date. 1.8 DISCRPENCIES AND CLARIFICATIONS 1. Advise Consultant of discrepancies discovered in requirements of the Contract Documents and request clarification in written form. 2. Advise Consultant when clarifications are required pertaining to meaning or intent of requirements of Contract Documents and request clarification form Consultant in written form. 3. Do not proceed with related work until written clarification is provided by Consultant. 4. Failure to notify Consultant shall result in Contractor incurring responsibility for resulting deficiencies and expense at no additional cost. 5. Written instructions issue by the Consultant for the purpose of clarification, implicitly supersede applicable and relevant aspects of the Contract Documents irrespective of whether these documents are explicitly or specifically cited in clarification requests or clarification instructions. 1.9 SETTING OUT THE WORK 1. Assume full responsibility for and execute complete layout of the Work to required locations, lines and elevations. 2. Arrange meeting with Consultant to discuss critical setting out assumptions for the work and establish limiting conditions for setting out the Work. Consultant shall chair and prepare minutes of meeting and prepare and submit sketches regarding understanding of key setting out principals DOCUMENTS AT THE PLACE F WORK 1. Maintain at the Place of work, one copy of each of the following:.1 Contract Documents including drawings, specifications, addenda, and other modifications to the Contract..2 Reviewed or Reviewed as Modified shop drawings..3 Construction and submittal schedules.4 Supplemental Instructions, proposed Change Orders, Change Orders and Change Directives..5 Field test reports.6 Consultant s field reviews

15 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 4 of 13.7 Reports by authorities having jurisdiction.8 Building and other applicable permits, and related permit documents.9 Daily log including: a. Start and finish date of each part of the Work.10 As-built drawings recording as- built conditions, instructions, changes for structure, equipment, wiring, plumbing and the like, as called for in Section and Division 15 and 16, prior to being concealed. 2. Make above material available to Consultant upon request OVERLOADING 1. Protect the existing building from loads which may cause permanent deformation. 2. Protect the Work form loads which may cause permanent deformation INSERTS, ANCHORS AND FASTENERS 1. Use only factory made, threaded or toggle type inserts as required for supports and anchors, properly sized for load to be carried. 2. Where inserts cannot be placed, use factory made expansion shields for light weights only. 3. Supply and locate inserts, holes, anchor bolts and sleeves during placement or fabrication of structural elements. 4. Fasteners stressed in withdrawal are not acceptable, except where otherwise indicated. 5. Metal fastenings shall be uniform to metals materials and components being anchors or of a metal which will not set p a galvanic action causing damage to the fastening or metal component under moist conditions. 6. Fastenings for prefinished materials shall be of concealed type unless otherwise indicated, and when exposed finish is required, of matching pre-finishing materials. 7. Metal fastenings and accessories shall be same texture, colour and finish as material on which they occur as selected by Consultant. 8. Power actuated fasteners:.1 Power actuated fasteners: fastener system of type suitable for application indicated, fabricated from corrosion-resistant materials, with capability to sustain without failure, a load equal to 10 times design load, as determined by testing per ASTM E ( 2007) conducted by a qualified independent testing agency..2 Do not use power actuated fasteners which are stressed in withdrawal in finished work..3 Do not use power actuated fasteners within 100 mm (4`) of the edge of concrete or masonry, unless otherwise accepted in writing by Consultant..4 Do not use power actuated fasteners in post tensioned concrete PENETRATIONS 1. Holes or voids created in assemblies or partitions for penetrating mechanical, electrical, or sprinkler service items, shall be of sufficient size to accommodate the penetrating item as well as additional required fill materials, such as sealants, firestopping, and smoke sealants, insulation, and the like without exceeding the maximum opening allowable by the manufacturer of the additional fill material CONCEALED SPACES

16 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 5 of Conceal wiring, conduit pipes and ductwork in finished areas, unless otherwise indicated TRADEMARKS AND LABELS 1. Trademarks and labels, including applied labels, shall not be visible in finished work in finished areas, unless otherwise indicated by Consultant. 2. The exceptions to this requirement are trademarks and labels which are essential to identify materials, systems, assemblies and equipment for maintenance and replacement purposes and for life safety, fire resistance and temperature rise ratings WASTE AUDITS/PLANS FOR WASTE REDUCTION 1. Comply with requirements of jurisdictional authorities. 2. Deliver to nearest appropriate depot materials accepted for recycling by region or municipality having jurisdiction over the Place of Work, including but not limited to cardboard, paper, plastic, aluminum, steel, and glass. Deliver to nearest appropriate depot scrap and excess gypsum wallboard for recycling for this material. Costs for this work are in the Contract Price INTERFERENCES 1. Coordinate placement of equipment to ensure that components will be properly accommodated within spaces provided prior to commencement of the Work 2. Take complete responsibility for remedial work that results from failure to coordinate aspect of work prior to its fabrication/installation 3. Ensure that accesses and clearance required by jurisdictional authorities and/or for easy maintenance of equipment are provided in layout of equipment and services ITEMS SUPPLIED BY OWNER 1. NIC (Not in Contract) shall be used to designate various items of equipment that require coordination for installation although they are not provided as part of the Work. 2. SBO (Supplied by Owner) shall be used to designate various items of equipment that will be supplied by the Owner for installation by the Contractor as part of the Work..1 Install items indicated as supplied by Owner SBO during the work. Coordinate shipping and delivery with Owner. Store item supplied by Owner at the Place of Work and protect from damage. Install completely and leave in full operating condition, in accordance with manufacturer s directions SECURITY 1. Be responsible for security of the Place of Work and material from time the Work commences until completion. 2. Provide and maintain signs, hoardings guardrail, barriers, warning lights and other protection as required by authorities having jurisdiction for safety of the Place of the Work. Be responsible for adequacy of protection.

17 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 6 of SMOKING POLICY 1. Smoking in the Owner s premises is prohibited. 2. Smoking in the Place of Work is prohibited. 3. Smoking within 25 m of the existing or completed buildings is prohibited ELECTRONIC FILES 1. In the event that the Contractor, Sub-contractor or a supplier requests Computer aided drawings or other electronic documents or files from the Consultant, the Consultant will be allowed to use their discretion whether or not they will provide the. The Consultant may charge a fee for providing the electronic files and/or require a copyright Waiver to be signed, also at the Consultant s discretion EXAMINATION OF SITE 1. Examine the site and be aware of all conditions affecting the Work. No claims will be entertained at any time which would properly have been avoided by a thorough examination of the site. 2. All Bidders, Subcontract Bidders and Suppliers will be allowed to examine the Site during the Bid Period, if application is made to the Owner SITE CONDITIONS 1. Existing known conditions of the site are shown on the Drawings. No responsibility is assumed by the Owner for the accuracy of this information EXAMINATION BEFORE EXECUTION OF WORK 1. Make good defects in the Work on which further execution of work depends. 2. Verify dimensions of prepared work before fabrication of that work which is dependent on the prepared work. 3. Do not proceed with the execution of the work unless the work which is to receive it and site conditions are satisfactory. Commencement of all work of all sections shall imply that prepared work and site conditions are satisfactory EXITS, ENTRIES AND PARKING 1. Vehicle access will be from Laurel St. A part of the parking lot below the pool may be used by the Contractor. 2. An area can be reserved, beside the building for the Contractor to use as a staging area, however room must be left for access to the splash pad PUBLIC UTILITIES AND SERVICES 1. Verify limitations imposed on project work by presence of utilities and services, and ensure no damage occurs to them.

18 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 7 of Notify service authorities concerned so that they protect, remove, relocate or discontinue utilities and services, as they may require. 3. Make arrangements and pay for connection charges for services required for project work. 4. Locate poles, pipes, conduit, wires, fill pipes, vents, regulators, meters, and sanitary service work in inconspicuous locations. If not shown on drawings, verify location of service work with Consultant before commencing installation VERIFICATION OF INVERTS 1. Immediately after award of the Contract, verify all field service connections to ensure that drainage runs can meet the inverts of the site services. 2. Give notification immediately of any apparent difficulties or discrepancies. No extras will be paid for rerouting drains because site inverts cannot be met COOPERATION AND COORDINATION 1. The Contractor and Subcontractors shall cooperate and coordinate with work of their respective Trades so as to facilitate the continuous and expeditious progress of the Work. 2. The Contractor and Subcontractors shall provide each other in adequate time with all necessary instruction, information, inserts, anchors, templates, sleeves and accessories required to be fixed to, or inserted in, the Work. 3. Pay the cost of extra work caused by, and make up the time lost as the result of, failure to provide the necessary cooperation and coordination in adequate time. 4. Products specified in certain Sections of the Specifications, or indicated on the Drawings, may or may not require installation by supplier. Assign responsibility for installation of items not normally installed by supplier, and for unloading from Carrier and placing into final position of the Work. 5. Cooperate with Other Contractors and Trades and Subcontractors contracted to provide goods and services through the execution of Cash Allowances PROTECTION 1. Adequately protect from damage trowelled concrete surfaces and finished flooring. Take special measures when moving heavy loads or equipment on them. Keep floors free of oils, grease or other materials likely to discolour them or affect bond of applied surfaces. 2. While working, each Section shall protect work of other Sections from damage. 3. Damaged work shall be made good by Trades which performed original work, but at the expense of those who caused the damage. 4. Protect work and existing property. If damaged, repair or replace to Consultant s satisfaction. Take all necessary reasonable precautions to guard site, premises, materials, and public when supervised work is in progress, and at all other times. 5. Adequately protect landscaping, trees, and shrubs which are to remain and could be subject to damage from construction. Box-in and fence-in growth to be protected prior to commencement of the Work. 6. Provide necessary protection from adverse weather damage to persons, materials, and equipment during and after cutting through existing work CUTTING AND PATCHING

19 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 8 of Each Section shall be responsible for cutting and patching and making good to execute their work properly. In each case, Tradesmen qualified in the work being cut and patched shall be employed to ensure that it is correctly and neatly done. 2. Assess requirements for sleeving the structural elements for passing of pipes, conduits and other mechanical or electrical components, and include all work required for approved interfacing between the structure, all mechanical and electrical work, and other components of the work. The Section requiring cuts, holes, sleeves or anchors for their work shall locate them. 3. To completely prevent the passage of air, tightly fit all construction to pipes, ducts and conduits which pass through construction. Pay particular attention where fire separations are penetrated with such objects. Build separations tightly to materials penetrating separations, or provide other materials for packing around perimeters which are specifically manufactured for such conditions. Packing materials shall be of the equivalent fire resistance rating of the penetrated construction. Obtain Consultant s approval prior to the use of packing materials CONCEALMENT OF PIPES, DUCTS, TUBING AND WIRING 1. Pipes, ducts, tubing and wiring shall be concealed wherever possible. If any doubt arises as to the means of concealment, or the intention of the Contract Documents in this connection, request clarification from the Consultant before proceeding with the portion of the work in question. 2. Arrangements shall be made to have the mechanical and electrical work laid out well in advance of concrete placement and furring installation so that provision may be made for proper concealment. All such work shall be tested, inspected and pipe covering applied where applicable before being concealed. 3. Include work required to modify indicated location of pipes, ducts, conduits, and other mechanical or electrical components to fully conceal such components from view in finished spaces INTERFERENCE 1. Refer to Section Shop and Interference Drawings DRAINAGE 1. Ensure that positive drainage is provided to roof, floor, site drains and catch basins, as set in their final positions, and at all other locations to prevent water infiltration into the building. Provide constant slopes for drained surfaces to drains and drainage courses. 2. Verify the extent of each area served by a drain, or drainage course, to eliminate possible undrained surfaces. Coordinate the work of involved Subcontractors before each of their work proceeds. 3. If water is found to be ponding on floor areas due to improperly placed floor drains of improperly sloped construction, install additional floor drains to alleviate water ponding at no cost to the Owner. Test and demonstrate drainage of all concrete floors. Test setting beds prior to installation of ceramic tile AIR LEAKAGE AND EXPANSION CONTROL

20 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 9 of Recognizing that wall and roof materials are not dimensionally stable, and that they move differentially from the structural frame, the location of cracks should be anticipated and an airtight diaphragm and/or flexible sealants incorporated to maintain air-tightness, and to prevent problems due to vapour condensation. 2. In addition, connections between structural steel members are not airtight and perimeter connections must be made airtight. 3. Even if concealed behind convectors, panelling, wallboard or suspended ceilings, the interior surfaces of exterior walls and roofs shall be made airtight. Ensure that backup masonry walls are well laid with full mortar joints, and wallboard joints are sealed. 4. The manner of installation of all pipes, ducts, conduits, and electrical outlets shall be thoroughly coordinated to prevent the occurrence of air leaks: when pipes or conduits run adjacent to exterior walls and are to be furred in, not only shall the exterior wall be airtight, but it shall be adequately insulated to prevent cold spots on which condensation could occur in the cold space. Provide a continuous air seal between the airtight part of a wall or ceiling and the frames of all openings such as windows, doors, hatches, ducts, grilles, louvers, structural steel members and similar building elements. 5. As a general rule, the air/vapour barrier must be on the interior (warm) side of the insulation and should be in contact with it. 6. In addition to the specific requirements in each technical section of the Specification, make allowance for expansion control throughout the construction. Ensure that poured paving and slabs, exterior to the building structure, together with applied materials are not tight to building face, and that expansion control joints are left to accommodate movement. 7. Take particular care in constructing walls and ceilings around wet areas such as pools and showers, to avoid moisture transfer to adjacent building areas LOCAL LABOUR AND FAIR WAGES 1. Wherever possible, the Contractor shall give preference to the use of local labour, building mechanics, suppliers and subtrades. Rates of wages, hours and conditions of work of persons employed on the work shall be in accordance with Provincial Codes, and as generally recognized and accepted in the locality JOB MEETINGS 1. Refer to Section Meeting and Progress Records 1.38 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUALS 1. Refer to Section Submittals MAINTENANCE MATERIALS 1. Refer to Section Submittals AS-BUILT DRAWINGS 1. Refer to Section Submittals.

21 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 10 of SCAFFOLDING 1. Erect scaffolding independent of walls. Use scaffolding so as to interfere as little as possible with other Subcontractors work. When not in use, move scaffolding as necessary to permit installation of other work. Construct and maintain scaffolding in a rigid, secure and safe manner. Promptly remove scaffolding when no longer required BUILDING DIMENSIONS & COORDINATION 1. Ensure that all necessary job dimensions are taken and all trades are coordinated for the proper execution of the work. Assume complete responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of such dimensions, and for coordination. 2. Verify that all work, as it proceeds, is executed in accordance with dimensions and positions indicated which maintain levels and clearances to adjacent work, as set out by requirements of the drawings, and ensure that work installed in error is rectified before construction resumes. 3. Check and verify all dimensions referring to the work and the interfacing of all services. Verify all dimensions, with the trade concerned when pertaining to the work of other trades. Be responsible to see that Subcontractors for various trades cooperate for the proper performance of the Work. 4. Avoid scaling directly from the drawings. If there is ambiguity or lack of information, immediately inform the Consultant. Be responsible for any change through the disregarding of this clause. 5. All details and measurements of any work which is to fit or to conform with work installed shall be taken at the building. 6. Advise Consultant of discrepancies and if there are omissions on drawings, particularly reflected ceiling plans and jointing patterns for paving, ceramic tile, or carpet tile layouts, which affect aesthetics, or which interfere with services, equipment or surfaces. DO NOT PROCEED without direction from the Consultant. 7. Ensure that each Subcontractor communicates requirements for site conditions and surfaces necessary for the execution of the Subcontractor's work, including the provision of setting drawings, templates and all other information necessary for the location and installation of material, holes, sleeves, insets, anchors, accessories, fastenings, connections and access panels. Inform other Subcontractors whose work is affected by these requirements and preparatory work. 8. Prepare interference drawings to properly coordinate the work where necessitated. Refer to Clause The pool length and slope of bottom will be measured to ensure conformance with the documents METRIC OR IMPERIAL DIMENSIONS 1. Dimensioning shown on the Drawings and Specifications is in imperial measurements.

22 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 11 of Where manufactured products are available in Imperial or metric sizes which differ slightly from dimensions shown on the Drawings or in the Specifications, the Consultant will consider acceptance of such products if they do not, in their opinion, adversely affect the performance of the Work WORK SCHEDULE 1. Refer to Section Construction Schedule TEMPORARY FACILITIES 1. Refer to Section Temporary Facilities and Controls PERMANENT SYSTEM 1. Do not use permanent heating and ventilation systems for temporary heating and ventilation without obtaining prior approval from Consultant and Owner. Refer also to Mechanical and Electrical Contract Documents for additional specific instructions, and conform to requirements set-out therein. 2. Do not use permanent drains including floor drains for any purpose other than their intended permanent use. In particular, do not clean tools into floor drains or wash any type of construction debris or residue into floor drains. Cover and protect floor drains except as required for testing and verification of plumbing systems INSPECTION AND TESTING 1. Refer to Section Quality Control FIELD OFFICES AND DOCUMENTS AT JOB SITE 1. Refer to Section Temporary Facilities and Controls. 2. Maintain field office until Work is declared Substantially Performed. 3. Maintain at job site, one copy each of the following and make same available to the Consultant upon request: 1. Contract drawings. 2. Specifications. 3. Addenda. 4. Reviewed shop drawings. 5. Change orders. 6. Other modifications to Contract. 7. Field test reports. 8. Copy of approved work schedule. 9. Manufacturer's installation and application instructions. 10. Standards referred to in Specifications. 11. Ontario Building Code and Guide to the Ontario Building Code, latest edition HOARDING AND BARRIERS

23 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 12 of Prior to commencing construction, consult with relevant Authorities having jurisdiction and comply with their regulations governing hoarding and boarding around the construction area. Place within existing buildings. Erect in consultation with Owner and Consultant. 2. Provide adequate temporary directional signage, barriers and night and day illumination. 3. Refer also to Section Temporary Facilities and Controls DEMONSTRATION OF SYSTEMS 1. Upon certification of Substantial Performance or, if called upon earlier, demonstrate complete operation of mechanical and electrical systems and equipment. 2. Demonstration shall take place in the presence of Owner s appointed personnel and shall be conducted by responsible personnel whose work is being demonstrated. 3. Refer also to Section Quality Control REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 1. Conform to the latest published requirements of the Ontario Building Code, together with all related Supplements. If a conflict should arise between specific sections of the Code, follow the most stringent requirements. 2. Minimum Standard: Unless reference is made in the Contract Documents to other standards, all work shall conform to or exceed the minimum applicable standards of The Building Code, and/or the governing Jurisdictional Authorities. 3. Where reference is made to published standards and codes, such references shall be considered to refer to the 1997 edition of The Ontario Building Code for standards. 4. Construction Safety: Include all provisions for construction safety, such as fences, barricades, bracing supports, storage facilities, sanitation facilities, fire protection, standpipes, electrical supply, temporary heat, steam supply, ventilation, construction equipment with its supports and guards, stairs, ramps, platforms, runways, ladders, scaffolds, guardrails, temporary flooring, rubbish chutes, walkway lighting, and morality lighting, all as required by the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and amendments thereto and the Fire Code Ontario Regulation 388/97 as well as all other applicable regulations of Jurisdictional Authorities LIFE AND FIRE SAFETY 1. Enforce all requirements established by Jurisdictional Authorities and Underwriters for life safety, fire prevention, and fire protection NO SMOKING POLICY 1. Smoking is not permitted within the Building and on the Site except for inside the Contractor s Field Office and at least 9 m (30 ) away from any Building entrance in accordance with applicable legislation.

24 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Page 13 of PROMOTIONAL SIGNAGE 1. Promotional signage, including any project signs and signs displaying Contractor or Subcontractor names and signs advertising materials, products and/or services to the site shall be limited to the Project Sign described in Section 01500, and to the names of the General Contractor, Mechanical Subcontractor and Electrical Subcontractor as permanently affixed to their respective site offices. 2. The Contractor shall mount one promotional sign each supplied by the Architect, Associate Architect, Structural/Mechanical/Electrical Engineer, Civil Engineer, and Landscape Architect. Such signs to be maximum 1600 mm x 750 mm, and mounted in a location which is visible from the municipal street. 3. All promotional signage shall be removed prior to the date of Substantial Performance of the Work CLEAN-UP 1. Further to the General Conditions, maintain the work in a tidy condition and free from the accumulation of waste products and debris, other than that caused by the Owner, other Contractors or their employees. 2. Conform to all requirements established by jurisdictional authorities for environmental and pollution control. 3. Prevent dust from spreading to adjoining properties. 4. Keep roads and sidewalks free from excavated materials, dirt and debris, snow, and ice USE OF PREMISES BEFORE SUBSTANTIAL PERFORMANCE 1. The Owner shall have the right to enter and occupy the building in whole or part for the purpose of placing fittings and equipment, or for other use, prior to certification of Substantial Performance if, in the opinion of the Owner, such entry and occupancy does not prevent, or interfere with, the Contractor in the performance of the Contract. 2. Despite the presence of the Owner s separate contractors on site, this Contractor shall retain complete responsibility for all Work under this Contract including construction safety and applicable payments to the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board PRODUCT & SYSTEM UPGRADES 1. Where upgraded or newer versions or models of systems or products in this Contract are available, become available, or are anticipated to become available within the Project Schedule, the Contractor shall provide the Owner with a proposal for consideration of a change to such products - END OF SECTION -

25 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ALLOWANCES Page 1 of SECTION INCLUDES 1. Cash Allowances 1.2 CASH ALLOWANCES Refer to GC Include, in the Contract Price, Cash Allowances stated in Contract Tender Call Document. 2. Cash Allowances shall be expended only on specific written instructions from the Consultant. 3. Include all applicable Taxes, except the Federal Goods and Services Tax, in each authorized expenditure from Cash Allowances. 4. Cash Allowances, unless otherwise specified, cover the net cost to the Contractor of services, products, construction machinery and equipment, freight, handling, unloading, storage, installation and other authorized expenses incurred in performing the Work. 5. The Contract Price, and not the Cash Allowances, includes the Contractor s overhead and profit in connection with such Cash Allowances. 6. The Contract Price will be adjusted by written Change Order to provide for an excess or deficit to the Cash Allowances. 7. Where costs under a Cash Allowance exceed the amount of the Allowance, the Contractor will be compensated for any excess incurred and substantiated, plus overhead and profit as set out in the Contract Documents. 8. The Contractor shall carry and administer any Cash Allowances specified in various Sections of the Specifications. Cash Allowances shall not be included by a Subcontractor in the amount for Subcontract Work. 9. Direct labour shall mean the hourly wages paid to the employees and shall exclude all other charges. Direct material shall mean list price less all trade discounts; do not credit cash discounts given to Contractor made before invoice due date. 10. Progress payments on account of work authorized under Cash Allowances shall be included in the Contractor s monthly application for payment. 11. A schedule shall be prepared jointly by the Consultant and Contractor to show when items called for under the Cash Allowances must be authorized by the Consultant for ordering purposes so that the progress of the Work will not be delayed. - END OF SECTION -

26 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: VALUATION OF CHANGES TO WORK Page 1 of 2 1. GENERAL 1.1 Apply Separate and Alternate Prices to Work as directed by the Consultant in accordance with the stipulations in this Section and the General Conditions of the Contract. 1.2 All prices described in this Section shall include the total cost of materials, labour, tools, equipment, fees, insurance, testing, preparation of Drawings, submittals, calculations, supervision, inspections, deliveries, travelling, out-oftown accommodations, rentals, duties, taxes, head office and site office overheads, profits, and all other direct and indirect expenses required to fully perform the specified Work. 1.3 Separate and Alternate Prices shall be valid until the latest possible date by which they could be implemented without affecting the date of Substantial Performance. 1.4 Changes to Work not covered by Separate or Alternate Prices shall be established by using current labour rates, including mandatory benefits, prevailing local market prices of materials and/or equipment, taxes, specific fees related to the change only, and overhead costs as defined below. Conform to Section Supplementary General Conditions, Item 12, GC 6.1 Changes. 1.5 Overhead shall include all costs of: 1. Operating head office and site facilities. 2. Head office and site personnel. 3. Custom duties, basic permits and other licences required by jurisdictional authorities. 4. Insurance. 5. All services defined in Sections and Calculations, inspections, testing. 7. Deliveries, travelling, out-of-town accommodations. 8. Hand and small power tools required for the efficient completion of the Work. 2. ALTERNATE PRICES 1. An Alternate Price defines the net cost difference between two different materials, products or processes described on the Drawings and Schedules, and in the Specifications and/or on Tender Form.

27 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: VALUATION OF CHANGES TO WORK Page 2 of 2 2. An Alternate Price for any work component identified as a second choice (an alternate) shall include all costs required to modify related and surrounding Work so that the alternate could function properly. 3. The above-mentioned modifications shall be acceptable to the Consultant. 3. CHANGES TO THE WORK 1. Conform to the requirements of the General Conditions, and Section for pricing contemplated and or changes to the Work. 2. Any costs related to preparation of the necessary documentation for changes/contemplated changes are deemed to be included in the specified overhead and profit. 3. Conform to Section Supplementary General Conditions, Item 12, GC 6.1 Changes. - END OF SECTION -

28 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: REQUESTS FOR INTERPRETATION Page 1 of REQUEST FOR INTERPRETATION (RFI) 1. A request for Interpretation (RFI) is a formal process used during the Work to obtain an interpretation of the Contract Documents. 1.2 SUBMITTAL PROCEDURES.1 RFI form:.1 Submit RFI on Request for Interpretation form, the Consultant shall not be respond to an RFI except as submitted in writing in this form..2 Where the RFI form does not provide sufficient space for complete information to be provided thereon attach additional sheets as required..3 Submit with RFI form necessary supporting documentation..2 RFI form:.1 Maintain a log if RFI s sent to and responses received from Consultant, complete with corresponding dates..2 Submit updated log of RFI s with each progress draw submittal..3 Submit RFI s sufficiently in advance of affected parts of the Work so as not to cause delay in the performance of the Work. Costs resulting from failure to do this will not be paid by the Owner..4 RFI s shall be submitted to the Consultant and to the Owner at the same time..5 RFI s shall be submitted only by the Contractor, RFI s submitted by Subcontractors or Suppliers shall not be accepted..6 Number RFI s consecutively in one sequence in order submitted..7 Submit one distinct RFI per RFI.8 Consultant shall review RFI s from the Contractor submitted in accordance with this Section, with the following understanding;.1 Consultant s response shall not be considered as a Change Order or Change Directive, nor does it authorize changes in the Contract Price or Contract Time or changes in the Work..2 Only the Consultant shall be respond to RFI s. Responses to RFI S received form entities other than the consultant shall not be considered..9 Allow three days for review of each RFI by the Consultant..1 Consultant s review of RFI commences on date of receipt by the Consultant of RFI submittal and extends to date RFI returned by the Consultant..2 When RFI submittal is received by Consultant before noon, review period commences that day; when RFI submittal is received by Consultant after noon review period begins the next working day..3 If at any time the Contractor submits a large enough number of RFI s such that the Consultant cannot process these RFI s within 3 days, the Consultant will confer with the Contractor within 1 working day of receipt of such RFI s and the Consultant and Contractor will jointly prepare an estimate of the time necessary for processing same as well as an order of priority between the RFI s submitted. The

29 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: REQUESTS FOR INTERPRETATION Page 2 of 2 Contractor shall accommodate such necessary time at no increase in the Contract Time and at no additional cost to the Owner..10 Contractor shall satisfy itself that an RFI is warranted by undertaking a thorough review of the Contract Documents to determine that the claim, dispute, or other matters in question relating to the performance of the Work or the interpretation of the Contract Documents. Contractor shall describe in detail this review on the RFI from as part of the RFI submission. RFI submittals that lack such detailed description, or where the detail is provided is in the opinion of the Consultant insufficient, shall not be reviewed by the Consultant. -END OF SECTION-

30 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE Page 1 of 2 1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1. Submit projected construction schedule for entire Work. Revise schedule when it cannot readily be related to the actual stage of construction. 2. FORMS OF SCHEDULES 1. Prepare in form of horizontal bar chart or C.P.M. network. Provide separate horizontal bar column for each trade or operation, or separate activity for each operation that can be completed independently of other operations or trades. Provide as follows: 3. CONTENT OF SCHEDULES 1. Order: Chronological order of beginning of each item of work. 2. Identification: Identify each column by distinct graphic delineation. 3. Horizontal Time Scale: Identify first workday of each week. 4. Scale and Spacing: To allow space for updating. 5. Minimum Sheet Sizing: 11" x 17". 1. Submit complete sequence of construction by activity, as follows: 1. Shop Drawings - Submittal dates, dates reviewed copies will be required. 2. Interference Drawings - Submittal dates, dates reviewed copies will be required. 3. Decision dates for products specified by allowances, selection of finishes and colours, etc. 4. Fabrication and delivery lead time. 5. Dates for beginning and completion of each element of construction, specifically: concrete placement, subcontractor work, equipment installations and equipment tests. 2. Identify work of separate floors or separate phases, or other logically grouped activities, with particular attention given to pools/aquatics area work. 3. Show projected percentage of completion for each item of work as of first day of each month. 4. Submit separate sub-schedule showing submittals, review times, procurement schedules, and delivery dates. 5. Submit sub-schedules to define critical portions of entire schedule.

31 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE Page 2 of 2 4. UPDATING 1. Show all changes occurring since previous submission of updated schedule. 2. Indicate progress of each activity, and show completion dates. 3. Include major changes in scope, activities modified since previous updating, revised projections due to changes, and other identifiable changes. 4. Provide narrative report including discussion of problem areas, including current and anticipated delay factors and their impact; corrective action taken or proposed, and its effect; effect of change in schedules of any work being done by the Owner or other parties for the Owner; and description of revisions (effect on schedule due to change of scope, revisions in duration of activities, and other changes that may affect schedule). 5. SUBMITTALS 1. Submit initial schedules within 15 days after date of Notice to Proceed. Consultant will review schedules and return review copy within 10 days after receipt. If required, resubmit within 7 days after return of review copy. 2. Submit updated schedules with monthly application for payment, accurately depicting progress to first day of each month. 3. Submit one reproducible transparency and one opaque print. 6. DISTRIBUTION 1. Distribute copies of reviewed schedules to job-site file, subcontractors, and other concerned parties. 2. Instruct recipients to report any liability to comply and provide detailed explanation with suggested remedies. - END OF SECTION -

32 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: COORDINATION Page 1 of GENERAL 1. Provide the Work in accordance with the Contract Documents and be responsible for delays or costs resulting from failure to properly inspect or coordinate the Work and for replacement or corrective work required. 1.2 IDENTIFICATION OF SYSTEMS 1. Provide identification of electrical and mechanical system installations and other automated systems or equipment in compliance with Contract Documents. 1.3 COMMISIONING AND SYSTEM DEMONSTRATIONS 1. Provide testing, adjusting, balancing and certification and commissioning of mechanical installations and other automated systems or equipment in accordance with Section Instruct Owner s designated representatives in operation and maintenance of mechanical and electrical installations and other automated systems or equipment in accordance with Section SUPERINTENDENCE 1. Provide full time project manager and a full tie site superintendent and necessary supporting staff personnel who shall be in attendance at the Place of Work while Work is being performed at all times, with proven experience, (min. 5 years), in erecting, supervising, testing and adjusting projects of comparable nature and complexity. 2. The Contractor shall appoint a full time site superintendent at the Place of Work who shall have overall authority at the Place of Work who shall have authority at the Place of Work and shall speak for the Contractor and represent the Contractor s interest and responsibilities at meeting at the Place of Work and in dealings with the Consultant and the Owner. 1.5 DIMENSIONS 1. Verify dimensions at the Place of Work before commencing shop drawings. Before fabrication commences report discrepancies to Consultant in writing. Incorporate accepted variances on shop drawings and as- built records. 1.6 COOPERATION WITH OWNER 1. The Owner reserve the right to commence moving furniture, fitments, and equipment into the building as soon as areas become available and Contractor and Subcontractors shall be required to cooperate closely with Owner and coordinate the Work to ensure that the Owner s requirements are accommodated. 1.7 COORDINATION

33 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: COORDINATION Page 2 of 2 1. Coordinate and ensure workers, Subcontractors and Suppliers cooperate to ensure that the Work will be carried out expeditiously and in proper sequence. 2. Make adjustments to allow adjustable work fit to fixed work. 1.8 BUILDING DEIMENSION, TEMPLATES, BUILT-INS AND COORDINATION 1. Take necessary dimensions for the proper execution of the Work. Assume complete responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of such dimensions and for coordination. 2. Provide forms, templates, anchors, sleeves, insets and accessories required to be fixed to or inserted in the Work and set in place or instruct separate Subcontractors as to their location. 3. Supply items to be built in, as and when required together with templates, measurements, shop drawings and other related information and assistance. 4. Pay the cost of extra work and make up time lost as a result of failure to provide necessary information and items to be built. 5. Verify that the Work, as it proceeds is executed in accordance with dimensions and portions indicated which maintain levels and clearances to adjacent work, as set out by requirements of the Contract Documents and ensure that the work installed in error is rectified before construction resumes. 6. Check and verify dimensions referring to interfacing of services. Verify such dimensions with interconnected portions of the Work. 7. Do not scale directly from drawings. Obtain clarification from the Consultant if there is ambiguity or lack of information. 8. Details and measurements of any work which is to fit or to conform to work installed shall be taken at the Place of Work. 9. Advise Consultant of discrepancies and omissions in the Contract Documents that affect aesthetics or that interfere with services, equipment or surface. Do not proceed with work affected by such items without clarification form Consultant. 10. Prepare and submit setting drawings, templates and other information necessary for the location and installation of material, holes, sleeves, inserts, anchors, accessories fastenings, connections and access panels. 11. Subcontractors shall direct related Subcontractors on site of specific locations required for sleeves and openings. - END OF SECTION -

34 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PROJECT MEETINGS Page 1 of 5 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 ADMINISTRATIVE.1 The Contractor shall schedule meetings as specified herein..1 Such scheduling shall be in consultation both with the Owner and with the Consultant..2 The Contractor shall prepare agendas for meetings specified herein..1 Agendas shall include, as a minimum the agenda items specified in the Contract Documents..3 The Contractor shall distribute written notice of each meeting specified herein, complete with meeting agenda, 4 days in advance of meeting date to the Consultant and the Owner and other affected parties..4 The Contractor shall chair and record the minutes of the meetings specified herein..1 Contractor shall distribute copies of minutes to Owner, the Consultant and to all others in attendance within 3 days after date of meeting..5 Representatives of parties shall be authorized to act on behalf of the parties they represent..6 Representatives of parties shall not attend meetings unless authorized by the Consultant and Owner..7 The Contractor shall prepare and distribute to the Consultant and Owner 4 days in advance of next progress meeting date the following;.1 Weekly progress reports containing updated schedules, shop drawings logs, requests for Interpretation logs, submittals and budget. 1.2 CONTRACT START UP MEETING.1 The Contractor shall schedule meetings as specified herein..1 Such scheduling shall be in consultation both with the Owner and with the Consultant..2 The Owner, the Consultant, the Contractor, site superintendent(s) and inspection testing company will be in attendance. 3 Agenda to include the following:.1 Appointment of official representatives of participants in the Project..2 Status of permits, fees and requirement of authorities having jurisdiction. Action required..3 Establishing a schedule for progress meetings. Progress meetings shall occur biweekly at a minimum and weekly were warranted at decision of Owner and/or Consultant..4 Requirements for Contract modification and interpretation procedures, including but not limited to; Requests For Interpretation, Contemplated Change Orders, Change Orders, Change Directives, Supplemental Instructions, procedure,

35 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PROJECT MEETINGS Page 2 of 5 approvals required, mark-up percentages permitted, time extensions, overtime and administrative requirements..5 Schedule of submission of samples, colour chips, and items for Owners and/or Consultant s consideration, Section Construction schedule and progress scheduling Section Delivery schedule of specified equipment, Section Appointment of inspection and testing agencies or firms, Section Requirements for notification for reviews. Allow a minimum of 48 hours notice to Consultant for review of the Work..10 Requirements for temporary facilities, signs, offices, storage sheds, utilities, fences, hoarding, Section Security requirements as and for the Place of Work, Section Owner supplied Products..13 Record drawings, Section Maintenance manuals, Section o Take-over procedures, acceptance, warranties, Section Progress claims, administrative procedures, holdbacks..17 Insurances, transcripts of policies..18 Contractor s safety procedures..19 Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Certificate. 1.3 PRE-INSTALLATION MEETINGS.1 During the course of the Work prior to Substantial Performance of the Work, schedule pre-installation meetings as required by the Contract Documents and coordinated with the Consultant..2 As far as possible, pre-installation meetings shall be scheduled\to take place on the same day as regularly scheduled progress meetings..3 Agenda to include the following:.1 Appointment of official representatives of participants in the Project..2 Review of existing conditions and affected work and testing thereof as required..3 Review of installation procedures ad requirements..4 Review of environmental and site condition requirements..5 Schedule of applicable portions of Work..6 Schedule of submission of samples, colour chips, and items for Consultant s consideration..7 Requirements for temporary facilities, site signs, offices, storage sheds, utilities fences, hoarding, Section Requirements for notification for reviews. Allow a minimum of 48 hours notice to Consultant for review of the Work..9 Requirements for inspections and tests as applicable. Schedule and undertake inspections in accordance with Section Delivery if specified equipment..11 Special safety requirements and procedures. 1.4 PROGRESS MEETINGS

36 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PROJECT MEETINGS Page 3 of 5.1 During the course of the Work prior to Substantial Performance of the Work, schedule progress meetings at east bi-weekly and additionally as may be required by the Owner or Consultant meetings as directed by the Contract Documents and coordinated with the Consultant.2 Attendees at progress meetings shall include the following:.1 Contractor..2 Contractor s site superintendent(s)..3 Consultant..4 Owner..3 Agenda to include the following:.1 Review of the proceedings of the previous meeting..2 Review of items arising from the proceedings..3 Review of the progress of the Work since previous meeting and Contractor s weekly progress report, as required..4 Field Observations, problems, conflicts..5 Update construction schedule..6 Problems that impede the compliance with construction schedule..7 Review of off-site fabrication delivery schedules..8 Review material delivery dates/schedules..9 Corrective measures and procedures to regain construction schedule..10 Revisions to construction schedule..11 Progress, schedule, during subsequent period of the Work..12 Review submittal schedules..13 Review status of submittals..14 Maintenance of quality standards..15 Pending changes and substitutions..16 Review of Contract modifications and interpretations including, but not limited to; Change Directives, Supplemental Instructions, for effect on construction schedule and Contract Time..17 Review of status of as-built documents..18 Other business. 1.5 PRE-TAKEOVER MEETING.1 Prior to application for Substantial Performance of the Work, schedule a pretakeover meeting..2 Agenda to include the following:.1 Review, approval of the proceedings of the previous meeting..2 Review of items arising from the proceedings..3 Review of procedures for Substantial Performance of the Work, completion of the Contract and handover of the Work..4 Field Observations, problems, conflicts..5 Review of outstanding Contract modifications and interpretations including but not limited to; Requests For Interpretation and log, Contemplated Change Orders, Change Orders, Change Directives, Supplemental Instructions, for effect on construction schedule and on Contract Time..6 Problems that impede Substantial Performance of the Work..7 Review of procedures for deficiency review. Corrective measures required..8 Review of arrangements for hydro, heating and other services.

37 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PROJECT MEETINGS Page 4 of 5.9 Review submittal requirements for warranties, manuals, and all demonstrations and documentation required for Substantial Performance of the Work..10 Progress schedule, during succeeding period of work..11 Review submittal requirements for warranties, annuals, and all demonstrations and documentation required for Substantial Performance of the Work..12 Review of keying and hardware requirements..13 Review status of as-built documents and record drawings..14 Status of commissioning and training..15 Review Contractor`s deficiency list and status..16 Cleaning for occupancy..17 Other business. 1.6 POST-CONSTRCUTION MEETING.1 Prior to application for completion of Contract, schedule a post-construction meeting. Four days prior to date for meeting, Consultant shall confirm a date for meeting based upon evaluation of completion requirements..2 Agenda to include the following:.1 Review, approval of the proceedings of the previous meeting..2 Confirmation that no business is arising from the proceedings..3 Confirmation of completion of the Contract and handover of reviewed documentation from Consultant to the Owner..4 Confirmation of Contemplated Change Orders, Change Orders, Change Directives, Supplemental Instructions..5 Problems that impede the Contract completion..6 Identify unresolved issues or potential warranty problems..7 Confirmation of completion of deficiencies..8 Corrective measures required..9 Confirmation of arrangements for hydro, heating and other services..10 Confirm submittal requirements for warranties, manuals and demonstrations and documentation for Contract completion are in order..11 Review of procedures for communication during post construction period...12 Handover of reviewed record documents by the Consultant to the Owner..13 Handover of Contract completion insurance policy transcripts by Contractor..14 Submission of final application for payment..15 Review and finalize outstanding claims, pricing and allowance amounts..16 Demobilization and Place of Work restoration..17 Review of requests for Interpretation log..18 Other business. 1.5 SPECIAL MEETINGS.1 Owner and/or Consultant reserve the right to require special meetings which may be held on short notice and a t which attendance by Contractor and representatives of affected Subcontractors and Suppliers is mandatory. Contractor shall keep detailed accurate meeting notes and distribute copies promptly to all in attendance and those affected by agreements made at such meetings..2 If the Contractor requires meetings in addition to those specified above that require the attendance of the Owner and the Consultant, the Contractor shall provide written notice of such meeting to both the Owner and Consultant at least

38 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PROJECT MEETINGS Page 5 of 5 48 hours in advance of the meeting setting out the reasons for the meeting and agendas for it. - END OF SECTION -

39 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION Page 1 of 2 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 GENERAL 1 Schedules required:.1 Construction schedule..2 Product delivery schedule..3 Inspection and testing schedule. 2 Format:.1 Prepare schedules in the form of a PERT or GANTT or Microsoft Project chart method..2 Include horizontal time scale identifying the first Working Day of each week..3 Format for listings: The chronological order of the start of each item or part of the Work..4 Identification of listings; by systems description 3 Construction schedule:.1 Include the complete sequence of construction activities, including provision for climate and weather..2 Include the dates for the commencement and completion for each major element of the Work parallel to the sections of the specifications..3 Show projected percentage of completion for each item as of the first Working Day of each week..4 Submit draft schedule for review and incorporate responses to comments identified by Consultant and/or Owner..5 Show dates for the commencement and completion of inspection and testing..6 At each date of submission of schedule, indicate progress of each activity..1 Show changes occurring since previous submission of the construction schedule:.1 major changes in scope.2 Change Orders and Change Directives.3 Activities modified since previous submission.4 Revised projections of progress and completion.5 Other identifiable changes.2 Include a narrative report to define:.1 Problem areas, anticipated delays and the impact on schedule.2 Corrective action recommended and its impact on the schedule.7 Submit revised construction schedule with each application for payment. 4 Product delivery schedule:.1 include dates for delivery of Products, equipment, finish items, and factoryfinished manufactured items. Show last dates for order, shipment and delivery in order to meet construction schedule. 5 Inspection and testing schedule:.1 Prepare schedule for inspection and testing by advance discussion with the selected inspection and testing company to determine the time required for the inspection and testing company to perform its test and to issue each of its findings and allow for require time in the construction schedule.

40 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION Page 2 of 2.2 Refer to Section for additional requirements for inspection and testing requirements. - END OF SECTION -

41 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PHOTOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTATION Page 1 of 1 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 General 1. Provide photographic documentation in digital format and in accordance with procedures and submission requirements specified in this section. 1.2 Digital photographs: 1. Equipment: Provide photographs using minimum 4 mega pixel digital camera. 2. Submit the required photographs to the Consultant and to the Owner. 3. Output: Supply date stamped maximum resolution colour photos to Consultant in JPEG format, and CD ROM format. 4. Number of photos required:.1 Prior to construction: Provide necessary number of photographs, as required to documents existing conditions and verify damage to adjacent streets and property which may or may not have occurred during construction: minimum 24 photos..2 Each progress draw: Provide 6-10 construction photographs each week to accompany each application for progress draw to document the stage of the Work from points selected by the Consultant showing as much as possible of the Work installed during the previous month..3 Completions: When the work is completed, arrange to take final photographs of the Work from a minimum of 8 points of view. PART 2 PRODUCTS Not Applicable PART 3 EXECUTION Not Applicable. END OF SECTION

42 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 1 of 14 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1. Submit submittals as requested by the Contract Documents, as specified herein and in accordance with the conditions of the Contract. 2. In addition to submittals specifically requested by the Contract Documents, submit other submittals as may be requested by the Consultant, or as required to coordinate the Work and to provide the Owner with choices available, within the scope of the Contract Documents. 3. Procedures and requirements for Contract closeout submittals shall be in accordance with the following Sections:.1 Section o01770 Contract Closeout Procedures and Submittals.2 Section Warranties 4. Contractor s review of submittals:.1 Review submittals for conformity to Contract Documents before submitting to Consultant. Submittal shall bear the stamp of Contractor and signature of a responsible official on Contractor s organization indicating in writing that such submittals have been checked and coordinated by Contractor. Contractor s review shall be performed by qualified personnel who have detailed understanding of those elements being reviewed and the conditions at the Place of Work proposed for installation..2 Check and sign each submittal and make notations considered necessary before submitting to Consultant for review. Where submittal is substantially and obviously in conflict with requirements of Contract Documents, reject submittal without submitting to Consultant and request resubmission. Note limited number of reviews of each submittal covered under Consultant s services as specified below..3 Contractor shall assume sole responsibility for any conflicts occurring in the Work that result from lack of comparison and coordination of submittals of the Work..4 Submittals that have not been reviewed, checked and coordinated by Contractor prior to submission to Consultant, will be rejected..5 Notify Consultant in writing of changes made on submittals from Contract Documents. Consultant s review of submittals shall not relieve Contractor of responsibility for changes mad form Contract Documents not covered by written notification to Consultant. 5. Consultant s review of submittals:.1 Review of submittals by Consultant is for the sole purpose of ascertaining conformance with the general design concepts and the general intent of the Contract Documents. This review shall not mean that the Consultant approves the detail design inherent in the submittals, responsibility for which shall remain with the Contractor. Such review shall not relieve the Contractor of the

43 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 2 of 14 responsibility for error or omissions in the submittals, or responsibility for meeting requirements of the Contract Documents..2 Contractor shall be responsible for dimensions to be confirmed and correlated at the Place of Work for information that pertains solely to fabrication processes or to techniques of construction and installation and for coordination of the Work..3 Consultant s review and markings on submittals do not authorize changes in the Work or the Contract Time and will be accommodated at no additional cost to the Owner. If in the opinion of the Contractor, the Consultant s markings on submittals constitute a change in the Work or will effect a change in the Contract Time, then the Contractor shall so notify the Consultant in writing and request an interpretation following the procedures for requests for interpretation in accordance with Section I f the Consultant finds that the Consultant s markings on submittals do constitute a change in the Work or will effect a change in the Contract Time, then a Change Order will be prepared therefore. taken to process such a request for interpretation shall not in and of itself constitute a change in the Work nor increase the Contract Time..4 Submittals which are not required by the Contract Documents or not requested by the Consultant will not be reviewed by the Consultant and will be marked NOT REVIEWED by the Consultant and returned to the Contractor. 6. Make submittal with reasonable promptness and in an orderly sequence so as to cause no delay in the Work. Be responsible of delays, make up time lost and pay added costs, at no additional cost to the Owner, incurred because of not making submittals in due time to permit proper review by the Consultant. 7. Submittals that contain substitutions will be rejected. Substitutions are permitted only on submittals as specified insection Do not proceed with work affected by a submittal, including ordering of Products, until relevant submittal has been reviewed by Consultant. 9. Prepare submittals using SI (metric) units. 10. Contractor s responsibility of errors and omissions in submittals is not relieved by Consultant s review of submittals. 11. Contractor s responsibility of deviations in submittal from requirements of Contract Documents is not relieved by Consultant s review of submittal, unless consultant gives written acceptance of specific deviations. 12. Engineered submittals:.1 Submittals for items required to be engineered shall be prepared under the direct control and supervision of a qualified professional engineer registered in the Place of Work, having a minimum of $1,00, professional liability insurance, who shall also apply his/her professional seal and signature to submittals prepared directly under their control and supervision..2 A certificate of insurance indicating that the professional engineer under whose direct control an supervision the submittal has been prepared has the required professional liability insurance is to be submitted with submittals required

44 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 3 of 14 o be sealed by a professional engineer, (or as otherwise indicated as engineered)..3 Design includes life safety, sizing of supports, anchors, framing, connections, spans and as additionally required to meet or exceed requirements if applicable codes, standards, regulations and authorities having jurisdiction..4 Engineered submittals shall include design calculations, complete with references to codes and standards used in such calculations, supporting the proposed design represented by the submittal. Prepare calculations in a clear and comprehensive manner so that they can be easily reviewed. Incomplete or haphazard calculations will be rejected..5 The professional engineer responsible for the preparation of engineered submittals shall undertake periodic field review, including review of associated mock- ups at locations wherever the work as described by the engineered submittal is in progress, during fabrication and installation of such work and shall submit a field review report after each site visit. Field review reports shall be submitted to the Consultant to Authorities having jurisdiction as required and in accordance with the building code..6 Field reviews shall be at intervals as necessary and appropriate to the progress of the work described by the submittal to allow the engineer to be familiar with the progress and quality of such work and to determine if the work is proceeding in general conformity with the Contract Documents, including reviewed shop drawings and design calculations..7 Upon completion of the parts of the Work covered by the engineered submittal, the professional engineer responsible for the preparation of the engineered submittal and for undertaking the periodic field reviews described above shall prepare and submit to the Consultant and to Authorities having jurisdiction as required a letter of general conformity for those pats =of the Work, certifying that they have been Provided in accordance with the requirements both of the Contract Documents and of the authorities having jurisdiction over the Place of Work..8 Costs of such filed reviews and field review reports and letters of general conformity are included in the Contract Price. 13. Keep copies of reviewed submittals at the Place of Work in a neat, orderly condition. Only submittals that have been reviewed by the Consultant and are marked with Consultant s review stamp, as applicable are permitted at the Place of Work. 14. The Work shall conform to reviewed submittals subject to the requirements of this section. Remove and replace materials or assemblies not matching reviewed submittals at no increase in the Contract Time and at no additional cost to the Owner. 1.2 SCHEDULE OF SUBMITTALS

45 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 4 of Before commencement of the Work, submit to the Consultant a detailed schedule of submittals required by the Contract Documents. 2. Schedule shall be accompanied by a checklist, correlated to each of the schedule o submittals, the construction schedule (specified under Section 01320), the Product delivery schedule (specified under Section 01320), and the schedule of inspections and tests (specified under Scetion01320 an d01450), listing the following:.1 Shop Drawings.2 Samples.3 Mock-ups.4 Reviews, tests and inspections by:.1 Manufacturers.2 Authorities having jurisdiction.3 The Owner.4 The Consultant.5 Inspection and testing companies..5 Demonstration and training 3. Indicate dates for submitting, review time resubmission time, flat time and last date for meeting construction schedule. 4. Consultant will review submittal schedule and advise Contractor if volume and timing of submittals will permit timely review and response. Consultant may require modifications to submittals schedule in order to allow adequate time for review of submittals. Adjust submittals schedule and construction schedule as required to comply with Consultant s needs. 5. Make provisions in schedule for at least 5 working days for the Consultant s review of submittals. When submittal have to be reviewed by one or more of the Consultant s sub-consultants, add 3 more days for a total of 8 working day review period. 6. If the Consultant requires resubmission of submittals, allow for an additional 5 working days review for each resubmission. 7. If, at any time the Contractor submits a large enough number of submittals such that the Consultant cannot process these submittals within 5 working days, the Consultant in consultation with the Contractor within 3 working days of receipt of such submittal, will provide the Contractor with an estimate of the time necessary for processing same, the Contractor shall accommodate such necessary time at no increase in the Contract Time and at no additional cost to the Owner. 8. The Contractor shall periodically resubmit the submittal schedule to correspond to changes in the construction schedule. Such resubmissions shall maintain the minimum 5 working day period for the Consultant s review. 9. Schedule submissions of submittals well in advance of scheduled dates for installation to provide for reviews and possible resubmissions and for placing orders and securing delivery so as to avoid delays in the Work.

46 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 5 of SUBMISSION PROCEDURES 1. Coordinate each submittal with requirements of the Work and Contract Documents. Individual submittals shall include related information. 2. Distribute copies of submittals to parties whose work is affected by submittals except Consultant and Owner before final submission for review by Consultant. 3. Accompany submittals with transmittal letter, in duplicate, containing;.1 Date..2 Project title and number..3 Contractor s name and address..4 Identification and quantity of each submittal..5 Other pertinent data. 4. Each submittal shall be identified numerically by relevant specification section number with a numeric indicator for multiple submittals by that section followed by revisions number, for example RO 5. Make any changes in submittal that Consultant may require, consistent with Contract Documents and resubmit as directed by Consultant. 6. Notify Consultant in writing, when resubmitting, of any revisions other than those requested by Consultant. 7. After Consultant s review, distribute copies to affected parties. 1.4 PRODUCT DATA SHEETS 1. Submit Product data sheet prints; 3 sets for Consultant( which includes 1 set that will be returned to the Contractor and 1 set that will be submitted to the Owner once submittal has been reviewed), 1 set for Contractor and 1 set each of applicable structural, mechanical and electrical engineers. 2. Submit Product data sheets for requirements requested in the Contract Documents and as the Consultant may reasonably request where shop drawings will not be prepared due to a standardized manufacture of a Product. Manufacturer s catalogue cut=s will be acceptable in such cases, providing that they are 213mm x 275mm (8 ½ x11 ) originals and that they indicate choices including sizes, colours, model numbers, options and other pertinent data, including installation instructions. Submissions showing only general information are not acceptable. 3. Where requirements of Contract Documents are more stringent than design proposed on Product data sheets, the requirements of the Contract Documents take priority. 4. Upon completion of review by Consultant, 1 marked set of Product data sheets will be returned to Contractor for reproduction and distribution and 1 marked set will be delivered to the Owner.

47 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 6 of Retain 1 complete set of prints of reviewed Product data sheets for issuance to Owner immediately prior to Substantial Performance of the Work, in an acceptable, bound manner and in accordance with Section SHOP DRAWINGS 1. Submit shop drawings prints; 3 sets for Consultant, (which includes 1 set that will be returned to the Contractor and 1 set that will be submitted to the Owner once submittal has been reviewed), 1 set for Contractor and 1 set each of applicable structural, mechanical and electrical engineers. Or submit PDF for review. 2. Lettering on shop drawings shall be not less than 3mm (1/8 ) high. 3. Where requirements of Contract Documents are more stringent than design proposed on shop drawings, the requirements of the Contract Documents take priority. 4. Consultant markings and resulting action required:.1 Shop drawings required no changes will be marked REVIEWED and shall be submitted for as-built purposes..2 Shop drawings requiring several changes will be marked as REVIEWED as NOTED and shall be revised and submitted for as-built purposes..3 Shop drawings requiring substantial changes will be marked REVISE and RESUBMIT and shall be revised and resubmitted until Consultant stamps drawings with REVIEWED or REVIEWED as NOTED 5. Shop drawing size shall be multiple of 213mm x275mm (8 ½ x11 ) excluding 38mm (1 ½ ) binding margin and not larger than 838mm x 117mm (33 x 44 ). Leave minimum 150mmx 100mm (6 x4 ) clear space for Consultant s comments. 6. Upon completion of review by Consultant, 1 marked set of shop drawings will be returned to Contractor for reproduction and distribution and 1 marked set will be delivered to Owner. 7. Retain 1 complete set of prints of reviewed shop drawings for issuance to Owner immediately prior to Substantial Performance of the Work, in an acceptable\, bound manner and in accordance with Section Submit copies of reviewed shop drawings to authorities having jurisdiction as required. 9. Shop drawings shall include:.1 Fabrication and erection drawings.2 Plans, sections, elevations, arrangements and sufficient full size details which indicate complete construction, components methods of assembly as well as interconnections and other parts of the Work..3 Design calculations prepared by professional engineers, as required substantiating sizes for members and connections based on design loads..4 Clear definition of the division of responsibility for the work described thereon. No Products, items or equipment, or description of work, shall be indicated to

48 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 7 of 14 be supplied or work to be done By Others or By Purchaser. Shop drawings marked with either of these phrases will be rejected without having been reviewed by the Consultant..5 Location and type of exposed anchors, attachments and locations and types of fasteners, including concealed reinforcements to accept mounted fasteners..6 Adhesives, joinery methods and bonding agents..7 Kinds and grades of materials, their characteristics, relative to their purpose, detailed description of finishes and other fabrication information..8 Configurations, types and sizes required; identify each unit type on drawing and on Product..9 Descriptive names of equipment and electrical characteristics when applicable..10 Data verifying that superimposed loads will not affect function, appearance and safety or work shown on shop drawings, as well as other interconnected work..11 Assumed design loadings, dimensions of elements and material specifications for load- bearing members..12 Proposed chases, sleeves, cuts and holes in structural members..13 Wall thickness of metals..14 Location and types of welds. For structural welds use AWS symbols and clearly show net weld lengths and sizes..15 Materials, gauges and sizes being supplied including connections, attachments, reinforcement, anchorage and locations of exposed fastenings..16 Installation instructions and details for Products to be installed by separate Subcontractors, including function of each part..17 A list of Products covered by, or included on the shop drawing. List of Products shall be complete and show manufacturer s name, Product name, generic description, standard certification where specified, manufacturer s complete installation data and precautions against wrong installation, operation and maintenance..18 Refer to individual sections of the specifications for more particular requirements for shop drawings. 10. Compatibility statement: include with each shop drawing a statement that each Product and material indicated on the shop drawing is comparable with each other Product and material with which it comes into contact. 1.6 SAMPLES 1. Deliver 3 samples to Consultant s office with expense, including carrying costs, prepaid,unless otherwise instructed. 2. Contractor and Subcontractor and date of submission. Identify location, specified material reference and any other pertinent information. Show construction by layered method if necessary, clearly displaying textures and patterns. 3. Resubmit samples until written acceptance is obtained from Consultant. 1.7 MOCK UPS

49 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 8 of Provide field or shop erected example of work complete with specified materials and workmanship. 2. Erect mock- ups at location as specified and as acceptable to Consultant. DO not proceed with work for which mock-ups are required prior to Consultant s review of mock-ups. 3. Protect and maintain mock-ups until directed to be removed. Commence work demonstrated in mock-up only after review and acceptance of workmanship. If possible, mock-up may become part of finished work, at sole discretion and with prior written acceptance of Consultant. 4. Reviewed and accepted mock ups will become standards of workmanship and material against which installed work will be compared. 5. Remove and replace materials or assemblies not matching reviewed mock-ups. 6. Resubmit mock-ups until written acceptance is obtained from Consultant. 7. In addition to any mock ups called for in the rest of the Contract Documents, provide a mock-up of transition from terrazzo to porcelain tile. Size and location as directed by the Consultant. 2. SUBMITTALS AFTER RECEIPT OF NOTICE TO PROCEED 1. Submit the following: 1. Initial Construction Schedule in accordance with Section 01310, within 10 working days of receipt of Notice to Proceed with Work. 3. SUBMITTALS PRIOR TO COMMENCEMENT OF WORK 1. Submit the following: 1. Performance Bond. 2. Labour and Material Payment Bond. 3. Certificate of Construction Insurances. 4. Contractor s Safety Policy. 5. Mechanical Acceptable Equipment Schedule 4. SUBMITTALS PRIOR TO FIRST APPLICATION FOR PAYMENT 1. Submit the following: 1. Letter of Good Standing from Workplace Safety & Insurance Board (WSIB). 2. A bar chart or CPM schedule, in accordance with CCDC 2 and Section of the Specifications. Combine mechanical and electrical in a separate schedule.

50 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 9 of Schedule of Shop Drawing and sample submissions. 4. Product delivery schedule. 5. Estimate of Monthly Progress Claims. 6. Breakdown of Progress Claim, to Consultant's standard. 7. Documentation required by OAA/OGCA Take Over Procedures Document No SUBMITTALS DURING PROGRESS OF CONSTRUCTION 1. Submit the following during the course of construction: 1. Construction Schedule updates. 2. Report on any damage, on conditions or problems arising out of receipt of Owner's equipment on site. 3. Samples 1. The Contractor shall submit for the Consultant's approval such standard manufacturers' samples as the Consultant may reasonably require. Samples shall be labelled as to origin and intended use in the work and shall conform to the requirements of the contract documents. 2. Submit samples where specified in each applicable trade section of the Specifications. Unless specified otherwise make samples of adequate size to represent the material intended for use on this project. 3. Where the degrees of marking or colour cannot be adequately shown in a single sample, submit a range of samples to show the extremes of colour and marking. Identify samples with project number, date, and name of Contractor. Materials used in building shall correspond to approved samples for quality, colour, texture, finish, and thickness. 4. Submit two samples of each item required unless specified otherwise. 5. Review submittals for conformity to Contract Documents before submitting to Consultant. Submittals shall bear stamp of Contractor and signature of a responsible official in Contractor s organization indicating in writing that such submittals have been checked and coordinated by Contractor. Contractor s review shall be performed by qualified personnel who have detailed understanding of those elements being reviewed and of the conditions at the Place of Work. 6. Check and sign each submittal and make notations considered necessary before submitting to Consultant for

51 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 10 of 14 review. Where submittal is substantially and obviously in conflict with requirements of Contract Documents, reject submittal without submitting to Consultant and request resubmission. Note limited number of reviews of each submittal covered under Consultant s services as specified below. 7. Contractor shall assume sole responsibility for any conflicts occurring in the Work that result from lack of comparison and coordination of submittals required for the Work. 8. Submittals that have not been reviewed, checked and coordinated by Contractor prior to submission to Consultant will be rejected. 9. Notify Consultant in writing of changes made on submittals from Contract Documents. Consultant s review of submittals shall not relieve Contractor of responsibility for changes made from Contract Documents not covered by written notification to Consultant. 4. Progress records in accordance with Section 01200, and testing and inspection reports in accordance with Section Mock-Ups: Refer to Section for requirements regarding installation of mock-ups during progress of construction. 6. Record Drawings and Record Specifications 1. Maintain, as the work progresses, until project duration, 1 set of project Record Drawings and Specifications. The full size drawings shall be in white prints while the 8-1/2" x 11" detail drawing sheets and Specifications shall be in photocopies. Refer to mechanical and electrical for their requirements. 2. Record accurately, on the Record Drawings and Specifications, all changes to the Contract Documents as constructed, such as Consultant/Engineer-originated changes, Contractor/Subcontractor-originated changes, Site Instructions, Supplementary Instructions, Addenda, instructions by correspondence and Jurisdictional Authority approvals. Carefully record location of concealed elements as required for future maintenance, alteration work, and building additions. Delete information made obsolete by changes, and accurately draw or duplicate instructions and indicate all changes listed herein. Refer to Mechanical and Electrical Specification Divisions for additional requirements. 3. Record exact location of all services with dimensions to the Grid Lines and Datum Lines, and show on Record Drawings prior to placing concrete. DO NOT place concrete until this

52 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 11 of 14 is done. Coordinate Mechanical, Electrical, and concrete trades. 4. Clearly mark each of the project Record Drawings and Specifications "Project Record Copy". Maintain in good condition. Make the File Copy available at all times for inspection or use by the Consultant. 5. Keep the File Record Drawings and Specifications current and do not record irrelevant information. Do not permanently conceal any work until the required information has been recorded. 6. Submit to the Consultant, the Record Drawings, 1 bound photocopy of the Drawing Detail Sheets and 1 bound copy of the Record Specifications with the application for Substantial Performance of the Project. 7. Consultant shall provide, to the Contractor, an electronic copy of the Contract Drawings in AutoCAD Release 14 format. The Contractor, using as-built information recorded on Record Drawings, shall revise these files to as-built status and provide an electronic copy to the Consultant with the application for Substantial Performance of the Project. 7. Shop Drawings 1. Submit shop drawings in accordance with Section 01340, and in accordance with Mechanical and Electrical Divisions of the Specifications. 2. Conform also to Section 00006, Supplementary General Conditions, Item 6, GC 3.11, Shop Drawings. 8. List of Paint Materials: Submit list of paint materials in accordance with Section Submit 6 x6 samples of each paint colour to Consultant minimum 1 month before painting start on site. 6. SUBMITTALS WHEN PROJECT IS SUBSTANTIALLY PERFORMED 1. Shop Drawings and Operation & Maintenance Manuals 1. Provide the Owner with Shop Drawings and the Operations & Maintenance Manuals prior to application for certification of Substantial Performance of the Project. 2. Shop Drawings shall consist of two complete sets of final "REVIEWED" and "Reviewed as Modified" shop drawings, on which corrections have been recorded of changes made during fabrication and installation of unforeseen conditions. Do not include drawings which were noted "REVISE AND RESUBMIT". 3. The Operations & Maintenance Manuals shall consist of two bound copies of hard, black, vinyl-covered loose leaf binders, to accommodate 8-½" x 11" sheets. Binders shall match in all

53 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 12 of 14 dimensions. A title sheet labelled "Operations & Maintenance Manuals" with project name, and the date of Substantial Performance and list of contents shall precede data. Organize required material into applicable sections of work. Each section shall be marked by labelled tabs protected with celluloid covers fastened to hard paper dividers. 4. The Operations & Maintenance Manual shall contain: 1. Equipment and operating instructions on all operable equipment and on all mechanical and electrical equipment, plumbing fixtures, and architectural hardware. Notes shall be typed. Drawings shall be neatly drafted and inked, or white-printed. Refer to Divisions 15 and 16 for additional requirements. 2. Maintenance instructions for all exterior, and interior floors, walls and ceiling surfaces. 3. Operating and maintenance instructions for all mechanical and electrical equipment. 4. Original brochures on all equipment. 5. Parts lists on all equipment including a list of suppliers. 6. All additional material used in the project beyond that indicated by brochures listed under the various sections, showing manufacturers and sources of supply. 7. Names, addresses and telephone numbers of the designer(s) and major contractor(s) who worked on the building. 8. Commissioning data such as air and water flows and regulating valve positions. 2. Affidavits 1. Submit to the Consultant affidavits which are specified in other Sections of the Specifications. 2. Submit affidavits in duplicate, and signed by a responsible officer of the certifying company. 3. Final Hydro Inspection Certificates/Approval Certificates: Collect the following from each trade whose work requires Hydro inspection/approval certificates and submit to the Consultant: 1. Original, final Hydro inspection certificates.

54 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 13 of Original approval certificates (CSA, ULC, etc.) for specified equipment. 4. Laboratory and Inspection Reports: Submit to the Consultant, in accordance with the technical Sections of the Specifications. 5. Extended Warranties: Provide the extended warranties specified. These extended warranties shall commence immediately after the expiration of the standard one-year warranty included in the Contract under Article GC 12.3, Warranty, the General Conditions of the Contract. The Contractor shall submit them on the Form of Warranty, a sample of which is included in this Section. 6. Maintenance Materials: Provide the Owner with extra materials for future maintenance use, as specified in the technical Sections of the Specifications. 7. Fixture Suspension Certificate: Submit to the Consultant a certificate from independent inspection company in accordance with Section Sprinkler Installation Certificate: Submit to the Consultant certificates of tests required by NFPA Plumbing, Heating and Building Inspection Certificates: Submit to the Consultant certificates of Plumbing, Heating and Building Inspection. 10. Survey Certificate: Submit to the Consultant survey certificates in accordance with Section Engineer's Certification: Where the documents require the seal of a registered Professional Engineer engaged by the Contractor, the Engineer(s) in question shall be responsible for providing certification as required by the Ontario Building Code or as required by the specifications, stating that the construction it designed is in conformity with that design. Submit one copy of the applicable certification to the Consultant before Substantial Performance. 12. Elevating Inspection Branch Data: Submit a copy of the Application of Registration, Specification Sheet, Wiring Diagram, Revisions Layout and other applicable data for submission to the Owner. 13. Record Drawings: Refer to "Record Drawings" and "Record Specifications" articles in this section. For information to be recorded, submit two copies of "as constructed" drawings showing all changes from the original contract documents.

55 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SUBMITTALS Page 14 of 14 NOTES: SAMPLE FORM OF EXTENDED WARRANTY 1. Items shown in brackets are to be changed to give the specific information for this project and trade. 2. Extended warranties are to be submitted through the General Contractor. 3. If validity of extended warranty is related to proper maintenance and servicing of equipment, etc., full details must be provided in the maintenance manuals. (Date) To: (Owner's Name and Address) EXTENDED WARRANTY (Name of Trade and Specification Section, or brief description of work covered). OWNER: PROJECT: WORK COVERED: WARRANTY PERIOD: (Name and Address of General Contractor) (Owner's Name and Address) (Full name and correct address) (Refer to Technical sections. State clearly, description of work covered, including consequential damage to other work, and what remedial action will be taken under the Warranty). Commences on date of Certificate of Substantial Performance * and expires on. (Name and Address of Trade Contractor) (Signature and Corporate Seal) (Signature and Corporate Seal) * (Unless otherwise agreed) - END OF SECTION -

56 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SHOP AND INTERFERENCE DRAWINGS Page 1 of 2 1. SHOP DRAWING GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1. Where specified or where deemed to be required by the Consultant, submit shop drawings to the Consultant in the following manner: 1. Submit one PDF document of each shop drawing with title block appearing at lower right-hand corner. 2. The use of photographed or photocopied Consultant's Drawings for shop drawing purposes is not acceptable. 3. Prior to submission to the Consultant, the Contractor shall review all shop drawings. By this review the Contractor represents that all field measurements, field construction criteria, materials, catalogue numbers, and similar data have been determined and verified, or will done, and that each shop drawing has been checked and coordinated with the requirements of the work and of the Contract Documents. The Contractor's review of each shop drawing shall be indicated by stamp, date, and signature of a responsible person. The Shop Drawing shall clearly indicate whether it is for review or for record purposes. 4. The Contractor (and Subcontractor(s) where appropriate), shall mark any information requested by the fabricator, confirm any matters in doubt, check and sign each trade shop drawing, and make any other notations considered necessary before submitting to the Consultant for review. 5. Drawings requiring several or extensive changes will be marked "REVISE AND RESUBMIT", otherwise one (1) white print and sepia will be returned marked "REVIEWED" or "REVIEWED WITH COMMENTS" and shall not be returned to the Consultant. Drawings marked "NOT REVIEWED" are either not required, or from an unacceptable supplier. 6. Manufacturer's catalogue cuts will be acceptable, providing they are 8½" x 11" originals, and they indicate all choices including sizes, colours, model number, options, and other pertinent data. Only one copy need be submitted to the Consultant, except for colour sample sheets. 2. Shop drawings shall show: 1. The name of the project. 2. Kinds of material and finishes. 3. Sections, arrangements and details which indicate complete construction, as well as all interconnections with other work. 4. Fabrication and erection dimensions, together with quantities and/or locations.

57 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SHOP AND INTERFERENCE DRAWINGS Page 2 of 2 5. Assumed design loadings, all dimensions of elements and material specifications for all load-bearing members. 6. Data verifying that superimposed loads will not affect function, appearance and safety of work shown on shop drawings, as well as other work interconnected. 7. Proposed chases, sleeves, cuts, and holes in structural members. 8. The time that the fabricator considers necessary from the date that the Contractor's authority to proceed is received (and shop drawing is returned) until the fabricated work will be delivered to the site, and for installation, if appropriate. 9. A 4½" x 3" high block for Consultant's review stamp, and another block of the same size for review stamp of Contractor's Engineer. 3. The review by the Consultant is for the sole purpose of ascertaining conformance with the general design concept. The review shall not mean that the Consultant approves the detail design inherent in the shop drawings, responsibility for which shall remain with the Contractor submitting same, and such review shall not relieve the Contractor of responsibility for errors or omissions in the shop drawings or of responsibility for meeting all requirements of the Contract Documents. The Contractor is responsible for dimensions to be confirmed and correlated at the job site, for information that pertains solely to fabrication processes or to techniques of construction and installation, and for coordination of the work of all trades. 4. The review of this drawing and/or any notes added to it, does not constitute authorization to proceed with any work which, in the Contractor's or Supplier's opinion, will involve extra cost to the Owner. 5. In the event of any conflict between the Contract Documents and a shop drawing, the Contract Documents shall govern. 6. Keep copies of "reviewed" and "reviewed with comments" shop drawings on site for Consultant's review. 2. INTERFERENCE DRAWINGS 1. The Contractor shall prepare colour-coded interference drawings in order to properly coordinate the work of all trades, such as, but not restricted to, plumbing and fire protection, sheet metal and air conditioning, electrical and building structure. 2. Bear all costs involved for the preparation of these drawings and the changes necessitated due to interference discovered by their preparation. Advise all trades and the Consultant of any rerouting or relocation required. 3. If interferences are discovered, advise Consultant immediately and do not proceed until adjustments are accepted. 4. Submit copies of drawings for the Consultant's records. - END OF SECTION -

58 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SCHEDULE OF VALUES Page 1 of 3 1. GENERAL 1. Submit a Schedule of Values to the Consultant at least 10 days prior to submitting first Application for Payment. 2. Upon request by Consultant, support values given with data that will substantiate their correctness. 3. Submit quantities of designated materials. 4. Refer to the General Conditions of the contract and Section Supplementary General Conditions for details of payment procedure. 5. Schedule of Values will be used only as basis for Contractor's Application for payment. 2. FORM OF SUBMITTAL 1. Submit a PDF of the typewritten Schedule of Values on 8½" x 11" white paper, in accordance with sample schedule included in this Section. 2. Use Table of Contents of this Specification as basis for the order for listing costs of work for sections under Division Identify each line item with number and title as listed in Table of Contents of this Specification. 3. PREPARING SCHEDULE OF VALUES 1. Itemize separate line item cost for each of the following general cost items: 1. Bonds. 2. Field Supervision and Layout. 3. Temporary Facilities and Controls. 2. Subdivide costs of products to be installed during several stages of construction into separate line items under each Section listing. 3. Break down installed costs into: 1. Delivered cost of product, with taxes paid (except Federal Goods and Services Tax). 2. Total installed cost, with overhead and profit. 4. Make sum of total costs of all items listed in schedule equal to total Contract Price excluding Federal Goods and Services Tax. 4. PREPARING SCHEDULE OF UNIT MATERIAL VALUES

59 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SCHEDULE OF VALUES Page 2 of 3 1. Submit separate schedule of unit prices for materials to be stored for which progress payments may be claimed. 2. Make form of submittal parallel to Schedule of Values, with each line item identified same as line item in Schedule of Values. 3. Include in unit price only: 1. Cost of material. 2. Delivery and unloading at site. 3. Sales taxes except Federal Goods & Services Tax. 4. Make sure that unit prices multiplied by quantities equal given material cost of that item in Schedule of Values. 5. REVIEW AND RESUBMITTAL 1. After review by Consultant, revise and resubmit Schedule (and Schedule of Material Values), as required. 2. Resubmit revised schedule in same manner.

60 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: SCHEDULE OF VALUES Page 3 of 3 TYPICAL SCHEDULE OF VALUES (Sample Mechanical Breakdown Shown) Project Project No. Payment Application No. Date of Application Covers Work completed for the period to Material Work Completed Item Cost Field Amount Site Work Previous % This Balance or incl. Labour (2 + 3) Stored in Application Compl. Request to Trade Shop Cost Matls. Place (5-6) Finish Labour SECTION Boilers & Controls Water Heaters & Controls SECTION Pipe & Fittings Piping Devices Hot Water Heating Devices Natural Gas Equipment Pumps Heating Units Water Treatment Humidifier - END OF SECTION -

61 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: QUALITY CONTROL Page 1 of 5 1. RELATED REQUIREMENTS 1. Section 01300: Submission of samples to confirm product quality. 2. Section 01600: Material and workmanship quality - reference standards. 2. INDEPENDENT TESTING AND INSPECTION COMPANIES 1. Naming of Companies 1. The Consultant will name independent inspection and testing companies to inspect and report on compliance of Work with the Specifications. For simplicity, independent inspection and testing companies are referred to in the documents as "Inspector(s)". 2. Inspection and testing by Inspector(s) is carried out for the Consultant's information and does not relieve the Contractor from its responsibility to perform Work in accordance with the Contract Documents. 2. Payment: Unless specified otherwise, payment for inspection and testing will be paid directly by the Owner. 3. Work to be Tested and/or Inspected: As identified in individual Specification Sections. 4. Access to the Work: Representatives of the Inspector(s) shall have access to the Work at all times. The Contractor shall provide assistance and facilities for such access in order that the Inspector(s) may properly perform its (their) function. 5. Extent of Testing: The extent of testing and inspection and the number of tests, if not specified in the applicable technical section of the Specifications, shall be verified with the Consultant before proceeding. Extra payment for testing and inspection beyond what the Consultant intends will be the Contractor's responsibility. 6. Notification of Work to be Tested: Be responsible for notifying all Inspector(s) as to when they will be required to inspect the work. Notify Inspector(s) at least 48 hours prior to testing. 7. Materials for Testing and Mock-Ups 1. Submit samples and/or materials required for testing. Submit with reasonable promptness and in an orderly sequence so as not to cause delay in the Work. 2. Provide labour and facilities to obtain and handle samples and materials on site. Provide sufficient space to store and cure test samples.

62 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: QUALITY CONTROL Page 2 of 5 8. Reports: Inspector(s) will submit copies of inspection and test reports promptly to the Consultant, the Owner, the Contractor, other applicable Consultants, and jurisdictional authorities. 3. CONTRACTOR S QUALITY CONTROL 1. Obtaining and payment of inspections, tests, or Engineer's stamps required by Code or Ordinances, or by a plan approval authority and made by a legally constituted authority, shall be the responsibility of the Contractor, unless otherwise provided by the Contract Documents. 2. Be responsible for inspection or testing performed exclusively for own quality control and convenience, and testing, adjustment and balancing of mechanical and electrical systems, and pay all costs associated therewith. 4. REVIEW BY CONSULTANT 1. Give the Consultant advance notice of shop fabrication, field erection and other phases of the Work so as to afford reasonable opportunity to review the Work for compliance with contract requirements. Failure to meet this requirement may be cause for the Consultant to classify the Work as defective. 2. Uncover any Work that has been designated for special tests, inspections or approvals before such is made, have the inspections or tests satisfactorily completed and make good such Work. 3. The Consultant may order any part of the Work to be examined if such Work is suspected to be not in accordance with the Contract Documents. If, upon examination such Work is found not in accordance with the Contract Documents, correct such Work and pay the cost of examination and correction. If such Work is found in accordance with the Contract Documents, the Owner will pay the cost of examination and replacement. 5. MOCK-UPS 1. General 1. Prior to proceeding with the Work, prepare mock-ups as requested in the individual sections of the specifications and in this section. Include for Work of all Sections required to provide mock-ups. 2. Construct in specified locations or as selected by the Consultant. 3. Prepare mock-ups for Consultant's review with reasonable promptness and in an orderly sequence, so as not to cause any delay in the Work. 4. Failure to prepare mock-ups in ample time is not considered sufficient reason for an extension of Contract Time and no claim for extension by reason of such default will be allowed.

63 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: QUALITY CONTROL Page 3 of 5 5. Remove mock-ups at conclusion of Work or when acceptable to Consultant. 6. CONSTRUCTION TOLERANCES 1. Unless more restrictive/demanding requirements are specified in other Sections, the following construction tolerances could be accepted: 1. "plumb and level" - 3 mm in 3 m. 2. "square" - 10 seconds more or less than 90 degrees. 3. "straight" - 3 mm under a 3 m long straight edge. 4. Tolerances shall not be cumulative. 7. NON-COMPLIANCE WITH INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 1. If the initial inspections and tests, required to establish compliance with the Contract Documents, indicates non-compliance with the Contract Documents, subsequent testing or re-inspection occasioned by noncompliance shall be performed by the same Inspector(s) and the cost thereof borne by the Contractor. 2. Where factual evidence exists that defective workmanship has occurred or that work has been carried out incorporating defective materials, the Consultant may have tests, inspections or surveys performed, analytical calculation of structural strength made and the like in order to help determine whether the work must be replaced. Tests, inspections or surveys carried out under these circumstances will be made at the Contractor's expense, regardless of their results, which may be such that, in the Consultant's opinion, the work may be acceptable. 3. All testing shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Ontario Building Code, except where this would in the Consultant's opinion cause undue delay or give results not representative of the rejected material in place. In this case, the tests shall be conducted in accordance with the standards given by the Consultant. 4. Materials or workmanship which fail to meet specified requirements may be rejected by the Consultant whenever found at any time prior to final acceptance of the work regardless of previous inspection. If rejected, defective materials or work incorporating defective materials or workmanship shall be promptly removed and replaced or repaired to the satisfaction of the Consultant, at no expense to the Owner. 8. WATER TEST 1 UNTREATED CONCRETE POOL TANKS

64 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: QUALITY CONTROL Page 4 of 5 1. When the pools have developed sufficient strength, as determined by the Consultant, and before the waterproofing and tile work is installed, the tank will be tested by filling with water. Refer to Section for procedures. 9. MEASURING OF POOL LENGTH AND BOTTOM SLOPES 1. The length of the lane pool (Tank A) and bottom slopes of the entire pool tank bottoms (Tanks A and B) shall be measured and recorded by an Ontario Land Surveyor. Therefore it is imperative that the documents are complied with. Refer to Section These measurements shall be performed prior to commencing with waterproofing and tile work. 10. WATER TEST 2 WATERPROOFED CONCRETE POOL TANKS 1. On completion of pool tanks structures and before tiling, the structures will be tested for watertightness as follows using either warm water testing or cold water testing method: 1. Warm water testing: Using water above 10 C (50 F). 1. Clean out structure, plug all drains, and shut all necessary valves. Waterproofing laitance can remain until completion of Water Test Fill with warm water to above overflow channel or skimmer level so that overflow channel is full. 3. Add no further water for 48 hours for concrete to absorb water. 4. Top off and test for 48 hours. 5. Record water and air temperature and relative humidity of the pool area every 8 hours. 6. Measure and record difference in water levels every 24 hours. 7. Report all readings and findings to the Consultant to determine if water leakage has occurred. 8. Make any repairs as required and directed by the Consultant and re-test.

65 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: QUALITY CONTROL Page 5 of 5 2. Cold water testing: Using water between 4.5 C (40 F) and 10 C (50 F). 1. As noted in warm water testing. 2. Fill pool tanks in 3 stages to allow water and concrete temperature to stabilize at a minimum temperature of 10 C (50 F). Allow a minimum of 24 hours between stages. Stage 1 - Fill deep end to 1450 mm tank elevation (Tank A). Stage 2 - Fill up to 600 mm (2 feet) below static water level (Tanks A & B). Stage 3 - Fill remainder to above overflow channel (Tanks A & B) 3. Add no further water for 48 hours for concrete to absorb water. 4. Top off and test for 72 hours. 5. Record water and air temperature and relative humidity of the pool area every 8 hours. 6. Measure and record difference in water levels every 24 hours. 7. Report all readings and findings to the Consultant to determine if water leakage has occurred. 8. Drain tank(s) in stages and record water levels if required to locate leaks. 9. Make any repairs as required and directed by the Consultant and re-test. 3. Any site conditions that differ from the above shall be brought to the attention of the Consultant before proceeding with filling and testing of pool tanks structures. 11. TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION OF OPERABLE EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS 1. Ensure that the Owner's representatives are adequately instructed, to the Owner s satisfaction, in all aspects of operation and maintenance of manual and automated systems and/or equipment, and all tests and adjustments have been performed to ensure smooth, trouble free operation is achieved, in compliance with Contract Documents. - END OF SECTION -

66 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TEMPORARY FACILITIES &CONTROLS Page 1 of 6 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 General Instructions 1. Temporary facilities and controls specified in this section shall be supplemented as applicable in accordance with Section Arrange, obtain and pay cost for permits required for temporary facilities and controls. 3. Provide and maintain temporary facilities and controls for the Work and remove them from the Work upon issuance of certificate of Substantial Performance of Work. 4. Arrange any pay for required temporary services, unless otherwise indicated by Consultant. 5. Protect and maintain without interruption, existing water, heating, drainage, telephone and other services within the Place of the Work to existing buildings not within the scope of the Work of this Contract. Obtain written permission of the Owner for services required to be temporarily shut off, at least 5 full working days in advance. 6. Do not use permanent conveying, mechanical, or electrical systems during the course of the Work unless specific written permission is provided by the Consultant. Use of permanent facilities or services for temporary construction shall not prejudice warranties 7. Provide connection and disconnection of temporary services and facilities required in the work including connection to existing services made available by the Owner. 1.2 Existing Services and Facilities 1. Do not use any existing services and facilities during construction unless specific written permission is provided by Owner. 1.3 Temporary Electrical Services 1. Provide and maintain an adequate temporary electrical service for performance of the Work including, but not limited to, operation of electric pumps, motors, vibrators and other power tools, hoisting and related construction and general illumination during the Work. 1. Use existing power, where available, subject to Owner s approval. Owner will pay electrical bills. 2. Provide and maintain any components and equipment necessary to transform supply power to necessary temporary power voltage. 1.4 Temporary Water Supply 1. Provide and maintain a temporary supply of water for use in the Work. 1. Use existing water supply, where available, subject to Owner s approval. Owner will pay water bills. 2. Extend supply pipe or pipes from nearest available sources and maintain in good condition until permanent system is installed and ready for use. 1.5 Temporary Sanitary Facilities

67 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TEMPORARY FACILITIES &CONTROLS Page 2 of 6 1. Temporary sanitary facilities shall be in accordance with Section Temporary Telephone, Fax Machine, and Computer 1. Superintendent shall be equipped with mobile telephone device. 2. Provide and maintain a computer for the purposes of and internet access. Computer is to have dedicated, high-speed access, and be provided complete with a printer capable of printing 11 x 7 format. 1.7 Temporary Heating and Ventilation 1. Provide and pay for temporary heating, cooling and ventilation required for the Work, including attendance, maintenance and fuel. 2. Provide temporary heat and ventilation as required to: 1. Facilitate continuous uninterrupted progress of the Work. 2. Protect the work and Products against damage and defacement caused by weather, harmful levels of temperature, humidity, and moisture. 3. Provide ambient temperatures and humidity levels for proper storage, installation and curing of materials, in accordance with specified standards and manufacturer s requirements. 4. Provide adequate ventilation to meet health regulation for safe working environment. 3. Prior to enclosing building, maintain work areas at not less than 7 Cº. After enclosing, keep premises heated to at least 13 C using approved temporary heating devices. Increase temperatures in isolated areas to 20 Cº as required by various sections of the specifications or by Product manufacturers. 4. Solid fuel salamanders will not be permitted. 5. Provide temporary heat or adequate protection by means of str w or other coverings to floor slabs, footings, or any part of building not specifically designed to withstand frost penetration. 6. Furnish other temporary heating as required by various sections of the specifications or by Product manufacturers. 7. Ventilate to the exterior of the building work areas as required when toxic materials are being utilized or cured. 8. Replace with new, any work damaged due to failure to provide adequate heat at no cost to Owner. 1.8 Temporary Enclosures and Protection 1. Provide temporary enclosures and protection of adequate construction to prevent dispersion of dust and dirt into other areas of existing building and to prevent dispersion of dust and dirt beyond the Place of the Work. 2. Provide temporary weather-tight enclosures and protection for exterior openings in building as soon as walls, floors and reefs are built so as to protect the Work from weather and vandalism. Provide doors in enclosures as necessary to maintain fire exits. 3. Temporary enclosure and protection shall be of finished appearance and painted to colour approved by Owner. 4. Provide dust seal and sound resistant enclosures to protect existing building and operations as indicate. Include temporary doors, fastenings and keys.

68 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TEMPORARY FACILITIES &CONTROLS Page 3 of 6 5. Insulate and air seal exterior enclosures to prevent condensation and drafts. 6. Supplement these requirements in accordance with Section Plant, Machinery and Scaffolding 1. Provide formwork, scaffolding, equipment, tools, machinery, and incidental appurtenances necessary for the proper execution of the Work. 2. Erect plant, machinery and scaffolding to permit access to building and the Work. 3. Use scaffolds in such manner as to interfere as little as possible with other trades operations. 4. Support scaffolds from finished surfaces only after taking precautions to prevent damage. No supports, clips, brackets, or similar devices shall be welded, bolted or otherwise affixed to any finished member or surface without prior permission Site Storage 1. Handle and store materials so as to prevent damage or defacement to the Work and surrounding property. 2. Owner is not responsible for securing Products or materials at the Place of the Work Protection of the Public 1. Provide fencing, barricades, hording, notices and warning boards and maintain lights and signals for protection of workers engaged on the Work, for protection of adjoining property and for protection of the public. 2. Where any special hazards exists from which it is not possible top protect the public safety by other means, watch persons shall be employed to preserve public safety until the area of special hazard no longer poses a risk of public safety Protection of the Work 1. Protect the Work from damage and defacement, and maintain protection until the Work is complete. 2. Protect completed Work from soiling, abrasion, punctures, damage or defacement and maintain protection until the surrounding or overhead work is complete. 3. Keep surfaces free of oils, grease, or other materials that may damage or deface them or affect bond of applied Products. 4. Remove and replace materials damaged or defaced as a result of failure to provide adequate protection 5. have damaged or defaced work corrected by workers meeting qualification requirements of the Contract Documents 1.13 Fire Protection

69 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TEMPORARY FACILITIES &CONTROLS Page 4 of 6 1. Take necessary precautions to eliminate fire hazards and to prevent damage to the Work, building materials, equipments and other property both public and private having to do with the Work. 2. Provide and maintain in working order, suitable labelled fire extinguishers and locate in prominent positions, to approval of authorities having jurisdictions. 3. When welding, brazing and performing any operation with an open flame, keep a portable fire extinguishes within close access of operator. 4. Store and locate materials and equipments packed in cardboard cartons, wood crates and other combustible containers in orderly and accessible manner. Place approved types of fire fighting equipment in vicinity of materials or equipment packed in this type of crates or cartoons until permanent fire protection and equipments are available. 5. Store rags and waste containing oil, grease or other flammable materials in an approved fire proofed cabinets or remove from the Place of the Work at the end of each Working Day 6. Only fire resistant tarpaulins are permitted at the Place of the Work. 7. Provide temporary sand pipes as the Work proceeds in accordance with applicable regulations. 8. When welding or using torching at the place of Work institute measures as required to prevent fire hazard. Maintain and document 2 hours fire watch after welding or torching work. 9. Use only non combustible materials for interior non temporary construction. 10. No fires or burning of waste is permitted at the Place of the Work. 11. Supplement these requirements in accordance with Section Pest Control 1. Provide rodent control and other pest control programs during the work in accordance with the authorities having jurisdictions Waste Management 1. Do not bury rubbish and waste materials at the Place of Work. 2. Do not dispose of waste into waterways or storm or sanitary sewers. 3. Do not burn waste materials at the Place of the Work. 4. Comply with waste disposal requirements of authorities having jurisdiction. 5. Remove waste materials from the Place of the Work daily. 6. Arrange and pay for removal of debris and waste from the Place of the Work. 7. Make arrangements with and obtain permits from authorities having jurisdiction for disposal of waste and debris. Pay fees.

70 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TEMPORARY FACILITIES &CONTROLS Page 5 of Control of Dust, Debris and Noises 1. Cover or wet down dry materials and rubbish to prevent blowing dust and debris. 2. Control dust and dirt produced during the Work to prevent dispersion beyond the immediate work areas. 3. Prevent materials from contaminating air beyond application area, by providing temporary enclosures and ventilation/ filtration. 4. Limit noise levels in accordance with requirements of authorities having jurisdiction and the Owner. 5. Prevent abrasive-blasting, pressure-washing spray, and other extraneous materials from contaminating air beyond application area. 6. Supplement these requirements in accordance with Section Traffic Control and Road Maintenance 1.18 Security 1. Do not block roads or impede traffic. Keep construction to designated roads only. Provide flag person to direct traffic as required. 2. Keep public and private roads free of dusts mud and debris resulting from truck, machinery and vehicular traffic related specifically to this project, for the duration of the work. 1. Provide security for the Place of the Work in accordance with section The contractor shall be solely responsible for securing the Place of Work and the Work, and securing areas used for the storage products or construction machinery and equipments. The owner shall have no responsibility in this regards. 3. Provide and maintain security lighting Design and Safety Requirements 1. Be responsible for design, erection, operation, maintenance and removal of temporary structural and other temporary facilities. Engage and pay for registered professional engineering personnel skilled in the appropriate discipline to perform these functions where required by law or by the Contract Documents; and in cases where such temporary facilities and their method of construction are of such a nature that professional engineering skill is required to produce safe and satisfactory results. 2. Engage and pay for professional engineer(s) registered in Place of Work to design and supervise construction and maintenance of hording, covered ways, protective canopies and project sign(s). Designs provide by Consultant or Owner for such work cover general appearance only Moisture and Mould Control 1. Avoid trapping water in finished work 2. Before installation of weather barriers, when materials are subjected to wetting and exposure and to air borne mould spores, protect as follows:

71 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: TEMPORARY FACILITIES &CONTROLS Page 6 of 6 1. Protect porous materials from water damage 2. Protect stored and installed material from flowing or standing water. 3. Keep porous and organic materials from coming into prolong contact with concrete. 4. Remove standing water from deck 5. keep deck opening covered or dammed 3. After installation of weather barriers but before full enclosure and conditioning of building, when installed materials are still subject to infiltration of moisture and ambient mould spores, protect as follows: 1. Do not load or install gypsum board or other porous materials or components, or items with high organic content, into partially enclosed building. 2. Keep interior spaces reasonably clean and protected from water damage. 3. Periodically collect and remove waste containing cellulose or other organic matter. 4. Discard or replace water-damaged materials 5. Do not install material that is wet. 6. Discard, replace or clean stored or installed material that begins to grow mould. 7. Perform work in a sequence that allows wet materials adequate time to dry before enclosing the material in gypsum board or other interior finishes. 4. After completing and sealing of the building enclosure but prior to the full operation of permanent heating, ventilation, and air condition systems, maintain as follows: PART 2 PRODUCTS NOT APPLICABLE PART 3 EXECUTION 1. Control moisture and humidity inside building by maintaining effective drying condition. 2. Use permanent heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system to control humidity. 3. Comply with manufacture s written instructions for temperature, relative humidity, and exposure to water limits. NOT APPLICABLE END OF SECTION

72 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 1 of 7 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 Availability of Products 1. In the event of delays in supply of products, and should it subsequently appear that the Work may be delayed for such reason, Consultant reserves the right to substitute more readily available Products of similar character, at no additional cost to the Owner Product Handling 1. Handle and store products in a manner to prevent damage, adulteration, deterioration and soiling and in accordance with manufacturer s and supplier s recommendations and so as to ensure preservation of their quality and fitness for the Work, and protect from vandalism and theft. 2. Store packaged or bundled Products in original and undamaged condition with manufacturer s seals and labels intact, facing to outside. Do not remove from packaging or bundling until required in the Work. 3. Store materials susceptible to environmental damage in a weather tight enclosure raised clear of ground so that they are protected from weather, dampness and deterioration. Do not use such materials which have been damaged by exposure to moisture. 4. Keep sand, when used as ingredient for grout, mortar or similar mixed materials, clean and dry. Store sand on wooden platforms and cover with waterproof tarpaulin during increment weather. 5. Store sheet metals, lumber and other Products susceptible to deterioration on flat, solid supports and keep clear of ground or slab. Slope to shed moisture. 6. Store and mix paints in a single designated, heated and ventilated room. Remove oily rags and other combustible debris from place of Work daily. Take every precaution necessary to prevent spontaneous combustion. 7. Carefully handle materials to preclude damaging existing surfaces and work of others. 8. Remove and replace damaged Products. 9. Transportation:.1 Pay cost of transportation of products required in performance of Work..2 Transportation cost of Product supplied by Owner will be paid for by Owner. Unload, handle and store such Product at the Place of the Work..3 Reject Products damaged during transport.

73 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 2 of 7 PART 2 PRODUCTS 2.1 Product Requirements and Quality.4 Transportation of Products must be undertaken to suit construction schedule. Contractor is responsible for determining mode of transport to ensure delivery, obtaining shop drawings, placement of orders, and on time premium cost, air freight, and the like. 1. Products used for temporary facilities may have been previously used, providing they are sound in structural qualities. 2. Specific options: The Work is based on materials, Products and systems specified by manufacturer s catalogued trade names, reference to standards, by prescriptive specifications and by performance specifications..1 Where only one manufacture s trade name is specified for a Product, the Product is single sourced and shall be supplied by the specified manufacture..2 Where more than one manufacturer s trade name is specified for a product, supply one product from list of Product specified..3 When a Product is specified by reference to a standard, select one Product from manufacturer that meets or exceeds the requirements of the standard and manufacturer s written application directions..4 When a Product or system is specified by prescriptive or performance specifications provide one Product or system which meets or exceeds the requirements of the prescriptive or performance specifications, and manufacturer s written application directions..5 The onus is on the Contractor to prove compliance with governing public standards, prescriptive specifications and with performance specifications..6 Visual selection specification:.1 Where specifications include the phrase as selected by consultant from manufacture s full range or similar phrase, select a product that complies with requirements. Consultant will select colour, gloss, pattern, density or texture from manufacture s product line that includes both standards and premium items..7 Visual matching specification:.1 Where specification require match Consultants sample, provide a product that complies with requirements and matches consultant s sample. Consultant s decision will be final on whether a proposed product matches. 3. Products, materials, equipment and articles (referred to as Product throughout the Contract Documents) incorporated the Work shall be new, not damaged or defective, and of the quality standards specified, for the purpose of intended. If requested, furnish evidence as to type, source and quality of Products provided. 4. Where Contract Documents list acceptable products or acceptable manufacturers, select as applicable, one Product meeting performance of specifications and manufacturer s written application directions.

74 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 3 of 7 5. Where Contract Documents require design of a Product or system, and minimum material requirements are specified, the design of such Product or system shall employ materials specified within applicable section. Where secondary materials or components are not specified, augment with materials Meeting applicable code limitations, and incorporating compatibility criteria with adjacent work. 6. Defective products, whenever identified prior to completion of the Work, will be rejected, regardless of previous reviews. Review of the Work by Consultant or inspection and testing companies does not relieve the Contractor of the responsibility for executing the Work in accordance with the requirements of the Contract Documents, but is the precaution against over sight or error. Remove and replace defective Products and be responsible for delays and expenses caused by rejection at no additional cost to the Owner. 7. Should dispute arise as to quality or fitness of Products, the decision rests strictly with Consultant based upon the requirements of the Contract Documents. 8. Unless otherwise indicated in the Contract Documents, maintain uniformity of the Product and manufacturer for any like item, material, equipment, or assembly for the duration of the Work. 9. Products exposed in the finished Work shall be uniform in colour, texture, range, and quality, and be from one production run or batch, unless otherwise indicated. 10. Permanent labels, trade marks, and name plates on Products are not acceptable in prominent locations, except where required for operating instructions, or when located in mechanical, electrical, machinery, or like rooms. 11. Owner retains right to select from choices available within specified Products for colours, patterns, finishes or other options normally made available. Submit full range of product options in accordance with01330 for such selection. 12. Quality control:.1 Implement a system of quality control to ensure compliance with Contract Documents.2 Notify consultant of defects of Work or departures from intent of Contract Documents that may occur during construction. Consultant will recommend appropriate corrective action in accordance with requirements of Contract. PART 3 EXECUTION 3.1 Manufacture s Instructions

75 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 4 of 7 1. Unless otherwise indicated in the Contract Document, install or erect in accordance with manufacture's printed instructions. Do not relay on labels or enclosures supplied with Product. Obtain printed instructions directly from manufacture. 2. Notify Consultant in writing, of conflicts between the Contract Documents and manufacture s instructions. 3. Improper installation or erection of Products, due to failure in complying with these requirements, authorises consultant to require removal and re-installation at no additional cost to the Owner. 4. Manufacturer s representatives shall have access to the Wok at all times. Contractor shall render assistance and facilities for such access in order that the manufacturer s representative may properly perform their functions. 3.2 Galvanic/Dissimilar Metal Corrosion 1. Insulate dissimilar metals from each other by suitable plastic strips, washers or sleeves to prevent galvanic corrosion where conductive liquid or electrolyte (rainwater or condensation) exists. 3.3 Workmanship 1. General:.1 Execute the Work using workers experienced and skilled in the respective duties for which they are employed..2 Do not employ an unfit person or anyone unskilled in their required duties..3 Decisions as to the quality or fitness of workmanship in cases of dispute rest solely with Consultant, whose decision id final..4 Remove Products or materials that have been broken, chipped, cracked, discoloured, abraded, or damaged during construction period and provide undamaged Products or materials meeting the requirements of the Contract Documents. 2. Coordination:.1 Ensure cooperation of workers in layout of the Work. Maintain efficient and continuous supervision..2 be responsible for coordination and placement of openings, sleeves and accessories. 3. Concealment:.1 In finished areas conceal pipes, ducts and wiring in floors, walls and ceilings, except where indicated otherwise..2 Before installation, inform Consultant of any contradictory situation. Install as directed by Consultant. 4. Cutting and remedial work:.1 Perform cutting and remedial work required to make parts of the Work come together. Coordinate the Work to endure this requirement is maintained. Obtain permission from Consultant

76 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 5 of 7 before commencing any cutting. Refer also to requirements of Section Location of fixtures:.1 Consider location of fixtures, access panels, outlets and mechanical and electrical items indicated as approximate only. Locate fixtures, and the like approximately; Architectural drawings will relate these items to known dimensions, such as ceiling tile grid or wall locations and the like..2 Obtain Consultant s acceptance for precise locations of fixtures, access panels, outlets, mechanical, and electrical items..3 Consultant reserves the right to locate electrical outlets and mechanical fixtures at a later date, but prior to installation, without cost, provided that the relocation per outlet does not exceed 3050mm (10 ) from the original location..4 Inform Consultant of conflicting installations. Install only as directed by Consultant. 6. Fastenings:.1 Provide metal fastenings and accessories in same texture, colour and finish as adjacent materials, unless indicated otherwise..2 Prevent electrolytic action and corrosion between dissimilar metals and materials. 7. Protection in work in progress:.1 Take reasonable and necessary measures, including those required by authorities having jurisdiction, to provide protection..2 Adequately protect parts of the Work completed or in progress. Parts of the Work damaged or defaced due to failure in providing such protection is to be removed and replaced, as directed by the Consultant, at no additional cost to the Owner..3 Prevent overloading of any part of the building. Do not cut, drill or sleeve any load bearing structural member without written permission of Consultant, unless specifically indicated. Refer also to Section Adequately protect finished flooring from damage. Take special measures when moving heavy loads or equipment on them..5 Keep floors free of oils, grease or other materials likely to discolour them or affect bond of applied surfaces..6 Protect work of other Subcontractors from damage while doing subsequent work. Damaged work shall be made good by appropriate Subcontractors but at expense of those causing damage..7 Protect existing buildings, curbs, roads and lanes. If, during the Work, any buildings, curbs, roads or lanes are damaged, bear costs for repairs. 8. Existing utilities:.1 When braking into or connection to existing services or utilities, executes the Work at times approved by Owner, with a minimum of disturbance to Owner s ongoing operations, the Work, and traffic.

77 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 6 of 7.2 Protect, relocate or maintain existing active services. When inactive services are encountered, cap off in a manner approved by authority having jurisdiction and stake or otherwise record location of capped service. 9. Protection of mechanical and electrical Products or materials:.1 Wrap in protective plastic and seal mechanical and electrical items of mechanical and electrical equipment prior to and during for shipment, storage at the Place of the Work and after installation..2 Remove protective coverings only to the extent required for installation of the items. Re-install protection immediately following installation..3 Remove protective coverings in stages, as work areas are completed, or when directed by Consultant. 10. Operational Requirements:.1 Operable Products shall be provided fully operational and ready for intended use..2 Adjust operating hardware and accessories for a tight fit at contact points and whether stripping for smooth operation and weather tight closure. Lubricate hardware and moving parts for smooth Squeakfree function, in accordance with manufactures instructions. 11. General construction tolerances:.1 Unless more stringent tolerances are required by the Contract Documents or building code, construct the Work to the following tolerances..1 Maximum variation from plumbs in vertical lines, surface of columns, walls, and arises:.1 6.5mm(1/4 ) on 3m (10ft).2 9.6mm(3/8 ) in a storey height not to exceed 6m(20ft) mm(1/2 ) in 12 m(40ft) or more.2 Maximum variation from plumb for external corners, expansion joints, and other conspicuous lines: mm (1/4 ) in any storey or 6m (20ft) mm (1/2 ) 12 m (40 ft) or more.3 Maximum variation from level of grades for exposed lintels, sills, parapets, horizontal grooves, and other conspicuous lines: mm (1/4 ) in any bay or 6m (20ft) mm (1/2 ) 12 m (40 ft) or more.4 Maximum variation from drawing location of columns, walls, and partitions: mm(1/2 ) in any storey or 6m (20ft).2 19mm(3/4 ) in 12m(40ft) or more.5 Maximum variation in cross-sectional dimension of columns and thicknesses of wall from dimensions indicated:

78 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PRODUCT AND WORKMANSHIP Page 7 of 7.1 Minus 6 mm (1/4 ).2 Plus 12.7 mm (1/2 ).6 Maximum variation from plane or from straight:.1 3.2mm (1/8 ) in 3m (10ft) straight edge..7 Maximum variation from angle indicated:.1 10 Seconds.8 Tolerances shall be non - cumulative END OF SECTION

79 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION & CLEANING Page 1 of 4 PART 1 - GENERAL 1.1 DUST AND CLEANING REQUIREMENTS 1. Standards: Maintain project in accordance with the latest edition of The Occupational Health and Safety Act. 2. Hazards Control 1. Store volatile wastes in covered metal containers, and remove from premises daily. 2. Prevent accumulation of wastes which create hazardous conditions. 3. Provide adequate ventilation during use of volatile or noxious substances. 3. Conduct cleaning and disposal operations to comply with local ordinances and anti-pollution laws: 1. Do not burn or bury rubbish and waste materials on project site. 2. Do not dispose of volatile wastes such as mineral spirits, oil, paint thinner, excavated material or debris in storm, sanitary drains, streams or waterways. 1.2 WASTE AND MATERIALS MANAGEMENT 1. All materials generated from the work are to be managed in accordance with Ontario Regulation 347 "General - Waste Management Regulation R.R.O (as amended)" and Ontario Regulation 102/94 "Waste Audits and Waste Reduction Work Plans" and Ontario Regulation 103/94 "Industrial, Commercial and Institutional Source Separation Programs" of the Ontario Environmental Protection Act (EPA). 2. Segregate and deliver all reusable or recyclable materials to salvage dealers or recyclers in accordance with Ontario Regulation 103/94 of the EPA. 3. Segregate, transport and deliver all non-salvageable or non-recyclable materials to a licensed disposal facility. 4. Fences: Supply and install barriers, warning signs or other safeguards around waste and material stockpiles prior to leaving the job site at the end of each working day in accordance with Section Protection: 1. Protect and ensure stability of any waste or material stockpiles.

80 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION & CLEANING Page 2 of 4 2. Protect adjacent structures, equipment and existing work from any damage. In the event of damage, immediately make repairs and replace if necessary to the Consultant's satisfaction. 6. The Contractor shall maximize the amount of materials that can be recycled, salvaged or reused. An emphasis shall be placed on wood, steel and metal, concrete and brick in accordance with Ontario Regulations 102/94 and 103/ All other materials not recycled, salvaged or reused shall be managed or otherwise disposed in accordance with Regulation Waste asphalt shall not be reused on site but shall be sent to an asphalt recycler. PART 2 - PRODUCTS 2.1 CLEANING MATERIALS 1. Use only cleaning materials recommended by manufacturer of surface to be cleaned. 2. Use cleaning materials only on surfaces recommended by cleaning material manufacturer. PART 3 - EXECUTION 3.1 CLEANING DURING CONSTRUCTION 1. Execute cleaning to ensure that building, grounds, and public properties are maintained free from accumulations of waste materials and rubbish. Keep site clear of snow, mud and pooling of water due to severe rain. Ensure that work is not stopped because of failure to provide access to site. 2. Wet down dry materials and rubbish to prevent blowing dust. 3. At reasonable intervals during progress of Work, clean site and public properties and dispose of waste materials, debris and rubbish. 4. Provide on-site containers for collection of waste materials, debris and rubbish. 5. Remove waste materials, debris and rubbish from site and legally dispose of at public or private dumping areas off Owner's property. 6. Vacuum-clean interior building areas when ready to receive finish painting and continue vacuum cleaning on an as-needed basis until building is ready for Substantial Performance or occupancy. 7. Obtain from each Subcontractor, instructions which designate proper methods and materials to be use in final cleaning, and submit such instructions to the Consultant. Include instructions in Operation and Maintenance Manual specified in Section

81 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION & CLEANING Page 3 of 4 8. Handle materials in a controlled manner with as few handlings as possible; do not drop or throw materials from heights. 9. Schedule cleaning operations so that dust and other contaminants resulting from cleaning process will not fall on wet, newly-painted surfaces. 3.2 FINAL CLEANING 1. Prior to Substantial Performance of the Work, remove waste materials, rubbish, tools, equipment, machinery, and surplus materials, and clean all surfaces exposed to view; leave project clean and ready for occupancy. 2. Employ experienced workers, or professional cleaners, for final cleaning. 3. In preparation for Substantial Performance or occupancy, conduct final inspection of interior and exterior surfaces exposed to view, and of concealed spaces. 4. Remove dust and soil from all surfaces affected by the Work by vacuuming, damp mopping, washing or scrubbing as required. All necessary safety equipment is to be used. 5. Remove grease, dust, dirt, stains, labels, fingerprints, and other foreign materials from all exposed interior and exterior finished surfaces; polish resilient and ceramic surfaces so designated to shine finish. Vacuum carpet. 6. All high level and inaccessible surfaces including ventilation duct interiors are to be clean of construction debris and dust. 7. Clean and polish glass and mirrors. 8. Repair, patch and touch up marred surfaces to specified finish, to match adjacent surfaces. 9. Remove all surplus materials from site and clear all construction debris from anywhere on site including roofs, steps, ramps, platforms, walks, roads, etc. Broom-clean paved surfaces; rake clean other surfaces of grounds. Hose down all exterior platforms, steps, and ramps. Remove snow and ice from access to building. 10. Clean filters, exposed ductwork, and structure. Clean all equipment, fixtures, ductwork, piping and accessories, 11. Clean bulbs and lamps and replace those burned out. 12. Clean diffusers and grilles. 13. Clean sinks, faucets, and water closets and controls. 14. Remove all temporary labels, protective coating, markings and tags, and thoroughly clean adhesive off surfaces.

82 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION & CLEANING Page 4 of Avoid contamination of surrounding surfaces with cleaning fluids. Install temporary protection, if required, and remove same immediately upon completion of cleaning operation involved. 16. Methods of cleaning shall be in accordance with the manufacturer s recommendations of the finishes involved. 17. Soaps, detergents, waxes, and other cleaning materials and methods shall be as recommended by the manufacturer for finish surface material involved. 18. Use a heavy-duty type industrial machine for all vacuum cleaning. 19. Exercise extreme care with abrasive and chemical cleaning agents and verify their compatibility with finish and material to be cleaned. 19. Maintain cleaning until project, or portion thereof, is occupied by Owner. 3.3 REMOVAL OF TEMPORARY FACILITIES 1. Completely remove temporary facilities from site, including signs and foundations, making good any damage when no longer required. - END OF SECTION -

83 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CUTTING AND PATCHING Page 1 of 2 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 Cutting, Patching and Remedial Work. 1. Submittal Items 1. Comply with administrative requirements of Section Submit written request in advance of cutting, coring, and alteration that affects : 1. Structural integrity of any elements of Work. 2. Integrity of weather- exposed or moisture resistant elements 3. Efficiency, maintenance, or safety of any operational elements. 4. Visual qualities of sight exposed elements 5. Owner or work of other contractors. 3. Include in request 1. Identification of project 2. Location and description of affected work. 3. Statement of necessity for cutting or alteration 4. Description of proposed work and products to be used. 5. Alternatives to cutting and pitching. 6. Effect on Owner or Work of other contractors 7. Written permission of affected separate contractor. 8. Date and time work will be performed 9. Non-destructive structural survey; Radiography (x-ray) imaging of work to be cut or cored. 4. Do not commence cutting, patching, remedial work until request has been reviewed by Consultant 2. Preparation 1. Inspect existing conditions, including elements subject to damage or movement during cutting or patching. 2. After uncovering, inspect conditions affecting performance of the Work. 3. Beginning of cutting or patching means acceptance of existing conditions. 4. Provide support to assure structural integrity of surroundings; devices and methods to protect other portions of the Work from damage. 5. Provide protection from elements for areas which may be exposed by uncovering work. 6. Where uncovering of area exposes local deterioration cracking, evidence of water infiltration, structural settlement, previous modifications, or other unexpected conditions, advise consultant immediately in writing and leave conditions exposed until; receipt of consultant s written instructions. If area is exposed to the exterior, provide temporary protection from inclement weather. 3. Execution:

84 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CUTTING AND PATCHING Page 2 of 2 PART 2 PRODUCTS Not applicable PART 3 - EXECUTION Not applicable 1. Execute cutting, fitting, and patching to complete the Work. Under no circumstances will over cutting of corners of opening be accepted. Ensure corners of to be cut are predrilled or sawed. 2. Remove and replace defective and non conforming work. 3. Remove samples of installed work for testing if directed by Consultant. 4. Shop drawings identifying precise locations and size of openings to be cored and cut are to be submitted for review by Consultants. Provide nondestructive structural survey of structural concrete to be cored or cut, for Consultant review. Coring or cutting work locations shall be reviewed by Consultant for acceptance before proceeding. 5. Provide openings in non-structural elements of the Work for penetrations of mechanical and electrical work. 6. Perform work by methods to avoid damage to other work. And which will provide proper surfaces to receive patching and finishes. 7. Employ qualified installer with at least 3 years of relevant experience to perform cutting and patching for weather-exposed and moisture-resistant elements, and sight-exposed surfaces. 8. Cut rigid material using masonry saw or core drill. Pneumatic or impact tools not allowed to be used anywhere within existing buildings unless approved by Consultant. 9. Restore work with new products in accordance with requirements of Contract Documents. 10. Fit work to pipes, sleeves, ducts, conduit, and other penetrations through surfaces and with suitable allowances for deflection, expansion, contraction, and fire stopping. 11. Enclose pipes, ducts, conduits, and wires passing through floors at areas where faucets occur (for example, washrooms, kitchens, mechanical rooms on suspended floors, janitors rooms) in a 100 mm (4") high metal sleeve and make air and water tight with water resistant fire stopping. 12. Completely seal voids of penetrations of fire rated wall, ceiling, and floor constructions with fire stopping and smoke seals. 13. Refinish surfaces to match adjacent finishes. Refinish continuous surfaces to nearest intersection, refinish entire assembly unit. END OF SECTION

85 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: PROGRESSIVE CLEANING Page 1 of 1 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 Environmental Control 1. Conduct cleaning and disposal operations to comply with local ordinances and anti-pollution law 2. Store volatile wastes in covered metal containers, and remove from Place of Work daily. 3. Prevent accumulation of wastes which creates hazardous conditions. 4. Provide adequate ventilation during use of volatile or noxious substances. 1.2 Materials 1. Use only cleaning materials recommended by manufacture of surface to be cleaned and as recommended by cleaning material manufacture. 1.3 Cleaning During Construction 1. Clean up the Place of Work daily. Maintain clean and clear egress routes at all times 2. Maintain Place of Work, Ground s and public properties free from accumulations of waste materials and rubbish. 3. Provide containers at the Place of the Work for collection of waste materials and rubbish. Remove waste materials and rubbish from the Place of Work when containers become full. 4. Vacuum and clean interior building area when ready to receive finish painting, and continue vacuum cleaning on an as needed basis until Substantial Completion of the Work. 5. Scheduled cleaning operations so that dust and other contaminant resulting from cleaning process will nit fall on wet, newly painted surfaces. 6. Promptly as the Work proceeds, on a daily basis and upon completion, clean up and remove rubbish, surplus materials and equipments. 7. Remove as the work of the section progresses, corrosive and foreign materials which may set or become difficult to remove at time of final cleaning or which may damage members. 8. Wash exposed surfaces with a cleaning solutions approved by Product manufactures. 9. Debris and wastes not permitted within cavities of Work Final Cleaning 1. Perform final cleaning in accordance with requirements of Section PART 2 PRTODUCTS Not applicable PART 3 EXECUTION Not applicable END OF SECTION

86 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CONTRACT CLOSEOUT PROCEDURES Page 1 of 8 PART 1 GENERAL 1.1 General Instructions 1. The procedures for completing Contract and acceptance by the Owner shall be in accordance with the methods described in OAA/OGCA Document 100 (December 12, 2007) and any additional requirements described below. 2. Stages will be reviewed at the Contract start-up meeting to ensure that parties understand their responsibilities. Refer to Section for procedures and requirements for Contract start-up meeting. 3. Within 2 weeks of commencement of the Work, submit to the Consultant a list of closeout submittals required by the Contract Documents. 1.2 Final Cleaning 1. Environmental Controls: 1. Conduct cleaning and disposal operations to comply with local ordinances and anti-pollution laws. 2. Store volatile wastes in covered metal containers, and remove from Place of the Work daily. 3. Prevent accumulation of wastes which create hazardous conditions. 4. Provide adequate ventilation during use of volatile or noxious substances. 2. Materials: 1. Use only cleaning materials recommended by manufacturer of surface to be cleaned and as recommended by cleaning material manufacturer. 3. Final Cleaning: 1. Immediately prior to Consultant s review to determine if Substantial Performance of the Work has been achieved, remove surplus Products and construction machinery and equipment not required for the performance of the remaining Work. 2. Remove waste Products and debris other than that caused by the Owner, and leave the Work clean and suitable for occupancy by Owner. 3. When the Contract is competed, remove surplus Products, tools, construction machinery and equipment. 4. Clean glass, mirrors, hardware, wall tile, stainless steel, chrome, porcelain enamel, pre-finished surfaces, and fixtures. 5. Remove stains, spots, marks and dirt from decorative parts of the Work, electrical and mechanical fixtures, furniture fittings, walls, and fixtures. 6. Vacuum clean and remove from dust building interiors, behind grilles, louvers, and screens. Vacuum clean interiors of electrical equipments. 7. Clean floor finishes to recommendations of manufacturer. 8. Remove non-permanent labels. 9. Remove dirt and residue from surfaces.

87 Moorevale Park Clubhouse Section June 2018 Project: CONTRACT CLOSEOUT PROCEDURES Page 2 of Closeout Submittals 10. Inspect finishes, fittings and equipment and endure specified workmanship and operation. 11. At completion of the Work, remove protective coatings, clean surfaces and remove excess compounds and sealant materials. Make good defective, scratched or damaged work. 1. Collect renewed submittals, and assemble required closeout submittals executed by Subcontractors, Suppliers, and manufacturers. Prior to submitting closeout submittals to the Consultant, undertake the following: 1. Review maintenance manual contents (operating, maintenance instructions, as-built drawings, materials) for completeness. 2. Review supply and completeness of spare parts required by Contract Documents and manufacturers. 3. Review in relation to Contract Price, Change Orders, Chang Directives, holdbacks and other adjustments have been completed. 4. Review inspection and testing reports to verify conformance to intent of Contract Documents and that changes, repairs or replacements have been completed. 5. Execute transition of performance bond and labour and materials payment bond to warranty period requirements. 6. Submit a final statement of accounting giving total adjusted Contract Price, previous payments, and monies remaining at time of application for completion of the Contract. Consultant will issue a final change order reflecting approved adjustments to Contract Price not previously made. 2. No later than 5 Working Days prior to submitting request for Consultant s review to determine if Substantial Performance of the Work has been achieved, submit to the Consultant the closeout submittals specified in this section, including, but not limited to. 3. For equipment put into use with Owner s permission during the Work, submit required closeout submittals within 5 Working Days after start-up. 4. For items of the Work delayed materially beyond date of Substantial Performance of the Work, provide updated closeout submittals within 5 Working Days after acceptance, listing date of acceptance as start of warranty period. 5. Neither the Consultant s review to determine if Substantial Performance of the Work has been achieved, nor acceptance of the Work, will take place until receipt, by the Consultant, of acceptable copies of the closeout submittals required herein and by the Contract Documents. 6. As-built records: 1. Owner will provide 1 reproducible set of Contract Documents to the Contractor for as-built drawing purposes. 2. Accurately record changes to the Work and deviations from Contract Documents as the Work progresses. 3. Mark changes in red ink. 4. Record, without being limited to the following: 1. Field changes of dimensions/details.

88

Источник: https://docplayer.net/156070281-Please-refer-to-the-above-tender-call-document-in-your-possession-and-be-advised-of-the-following.html

This commit represents a new era for Gentoo: Storing the gentoo-x86 tree in Git, as converted from CVS. This commit is the start of the NEW history. Any historical data is intended to be grafted onto this point. Creation process: 1. Take final CVS checkout snapshot 2. Remove ALL ChangeLog* files 3. Transform all Manifests to thin 4. Remove empty Manifests 5. Convert all stale $Header$/$Id$ CVS keywords to non-expanded Git $Id$ 5.1. Do not touch files with -kb/-ko keyword flags. Signed-off-by: Robin H. Johnson <robbat2@gentoo.org> X-Thanks: Alec Warner <antarus@gentoo.org> - did the GSoC 2006 migration tests X-Thanks: Robin H. Johnson <robbat2@gentoo.org> - infra guy, herding this project X-Thanks: Nguyen Thai Ngoc Duy <pclouds@gentoo.org> - Former Gentoo developer, wrote Git features for the migration X-Thanks: Brian Harring <ferringb@gentoo.org> - wrote much python to improve cvs2svn X-Thanks: Rich Freeman <rich0@gentoo.org> - validation scripts X-Thanks: Patrick Lauer <patrick@gentoo.org> - Gentoo dev, running new 2014 work in migration X-Thanks: Michał Górny <mgorny@gentoo.org> - scripts, QA, nagging X-Thanks: All of other Gentoo developers - many ideas and lots of paint on the bikeshed

Источник: https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/commit/licenses?id=56bd759df1d0c750a065b8c845e93d5dfa6b549d
tail

The dmesg command returns a log that details all recent events. Messages resulting from the
attached USB flash drive are displayed at the bottom of the log. Record the name of the
connected device.

3. Switch to user root:

$ su -

4. Enter your root password when prompted.

5. Find the device node assigned to the drive. In this example, the drive name is sdd.

# dmesg

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux-8-Performing A Standard RHEL Installation-En-US

Performing a standard RHEL installation

Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 using the graphical user interface

Last Updated: 2019-10-21


Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation
Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 using the graphical user interface
Legal Notice
Copyright © 2019 Red Hat, Inc.

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Abstract
This document is for users who want to perform a standard Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 installation
using the graphical user interface.
Table of Contents

Table of Contents
. . . . . . . . . . . . . FEEDBACK
PROVIDING . . . . . . . . . . . . ON
. . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .DOCUMENTATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 1.. .INTRODUCTION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1. SUPPORTED ARCHITECTURES 8
1.2. INSTALLATION TERMINOLOGY 8

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 2.
. . INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .METHODS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional resources 9
2.1. PERFORMING A QUICK INSTALL ON AMD64, INTEL 64, AND 64-BIT ARM 9
Prerequisites 9
Procedure 9
Additional resources 10

. . . . . . .I.. PERFORMING
PART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A
. . GRAPHICAL
. . . . . . . . . . . . . INSTALL
. . . . . . . . . .ON
. . . .AMD64,
. . . . . . . . .INTEL
. . . . . . 64,
. . . .AND
. . . . . 64-BIT
. . . . . . . .ARM
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
..............

. . . . . . . . . . . 3.
CHAPTER . . INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WORKFLOW
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
..............

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 4.
. . .PREPARING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .FOR
. . . . .YOUR
. . . . . . INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
..............
4.1. RECOMMENDED STEPS 14
4.2. CHECK SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 14
Additional resources 14
4.3. CHOOSE AN INSTALLATION BOOT METHOD 14
Additional Resources 15
4.4. SELECT THE REQUIRED INSTALLATION IMAGE 15
Additional Resources 16
4.5. DOWNLOADING THE INSTALLATION ISO IMAGE 16
4.5.1. Downloading an ISO image from the Customer Portal 16
4.5.2. Downloading an ISO image using curl 17
Prerequisites 17
Procedure 17
4.6. CREATING INSTALLATION MEDIA 18
4.6.1. Creating a bootable DVD or CD 18
4.6.2. Creating a bootable USB device on Linux 18
Prerequisites 18
Procedure 18
4.6.3. Creating a bootable USB device on Windows 20
Prerequisites 20
Procedure 20
4.6.4. Creating a bootable USB device on Mac OS X 21
Prerequisites 21
Procedure 21
4.7. PREPARING AN INSTALLATION SOURCE 22
4.7.1. Types of installation source 22
4.7.2. Specify the installation source 23
4.7.3. Ports for network-based installation 23
4.7.4. Creating an installation source on an NFS server 24
Prerequisites 24
Procedure 24
4.7.5. Creating an installation source using HTTP or HTTPS 25
Prerequisites 25
Procedure 25
Additional resources 26

1
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

4.7.6. Creating an installation source using FTP 27


Prerequisites 27
Procedure 27

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 5.
. . BOOTING
. . . . . . . . . . . THE
. . . . .INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
..............
5.1. TYPES OF BOOT OPTIONS 30
5.2. EDITING BOOT OPTIONS 30
Editing the boot: prompt in BIOS 30
Editing the > prompt 31
Editing the GRUB2 menu 31
5.3. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION FROM A USB, CD, OR DVD 31
5.4. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION FROM A NETWORK USING PXE 32
Prerequisites 33
Procedure 33

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 6.
. . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .RHEL
. . . . . . USING
. . . . . . . .THE
. . . . GRAPHICAL
. . . . . . . . . . . . . USER
. . . . . . .INTERFACE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
..............
6.1. GRAPHICAL INSTALLATION WORKFLOW 35
6.2. CONFIGURING LANGUAGE AND LOCATION SETTINGS 35
6.3. THE INSTALLATION SUMMARY WINDOW 36
6.4. CONFIGURING LOCALIZATION OPTIONS 38
6.4.1. Configuring keyboard, language, and time and date settings 38
6.5. CONFIGURING SOFTWARE OPTIONS 40
6.5.1. Configuring installation source 40
6.5.2. Configuring software selection 42
6.6. CONFIGURING SYSTEM OPTIONS 43
6.6.1. Configuring installation destination 43
Procedure 44
6.6.1.1. Configuring boot loader 47
6.6.2. Configuring Kdump 48
Procedure 48
6.6.3. Configuring network and host name options 48
6.6.3.1. Configuring network and host name 49
6.6.3.2. Adding a virtual network interface 49
6.6.3.3. Editing network interface configuration 50
6.6.3.4. Enabling or Disabling the Interface Connection 51
6.6.3.5. Setting up Static IPv4 or IPv6 Settings 51
6.6.3.6. Configuring Routes 52
6.6.3.7. Additional resources 52
6.6.4. Configuring security policy 52
6.6.4.1. About security policy 52
6.6.4.2. Configuring a security policy 53
6.6.4.3. Related information 53
6.6.5. Configuring System Purpose 54
6.6.5.1. Introduction to System Purpose 54
Additional resources 55
6.6.5.2. Configuring System Purpose using the graphical user interface 55
Procedure 55
6.6.5.3. System Purpose status 56
6.7. CONFIGURING STORAGE DEVICES 57
6.7.1. Storage device selection 57
6.7.2. Filtering storage devices 58
6.7.3. Using advanced storage options 59
6.7.3.1. Discovering and starting an iSCSI session 59

2
Table of Contents

6.7.3.2. Configuring FCoE parameters 60


6.7.3.3. Configuring DASD storage devices 61
6.7.3.4. Configuring FCP devices 62
6.7.4. Installing to an NVDIMM device 63
6.7.4.1. Criteria for using an NVDIMM device as an installation target 63
6.7.4.2. Configuring an NVDIMM device using the graphical installation mode 63
6.8. CONFIGURING MANUAL PARTITIONING 64
6.8.1. Starting manual partitioning 65
6.8.2. Adding a mount point file system 66
6.8.3. Configuring a mount point file system 67
6.8.4. Customizing a partition or volume 68
6.8.5. Preserving the /home directory 70
Prerequisites 70
Procedure 70
6.8.6. Creating software RAID 71
6.8.7. Creating an LVM logical volume 72
6.8.8. Configuring an LVM logical volume 73
6.9. STARTING THE INSTALLATION PROGRAM 74
6.9.1. Beginning installation 74
6.9.2. Configuring a root password 74
6.9.3. Creating a user account 75
6.9.3.1. Editing advanced user settings 76
6.9.4. Graphical installation complete 77

. . . . . . . . . . . 7.
CHAPTER . . COMPLETING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .POST-INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TASKS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
..............
7.1. COMPLETING INITIAL SETUP 78
Prerequisite 78
Procedure 78
Additional resources 79
7.2. REGISTERING YOUR SYSTEM USING THE COMMAND LINE 79
7.3. REGISTERING YOUR SYSTEM USING THE SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER USER INTERFACE 81
Prerequisites 81
Procedure 81
Additional resources 81
7.4. REGISTRATION ASSISTANT 81
7.5. CONFIGURING SYSTEM PURPOSE USING THE COMMAND LINE 82
Prerequisites 82
Procedure 82
7.5.1. Redefining subscriptions using the syspurpose tool 83
Procedure 84
7.6. SECURING YOUR SYSTEM 84
Prerequisites 84
Procedure 84

. . . . . . . . . . . .A.
APPENDIX . . TROUBLESHOOTING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
..............
A.1. CONSOLES AND LOGGING DURING INSTALLATION 85
A.2. SAVING SCREENSHOTS 86
A.3. RESUMING AN INTERRUPTED DOWNLOAD ATTEMPT 86

. . . . . . . . . . . .B.
APPENDIX . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .REQUIREMENTS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REFERENCE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
..............
B.1. HARDWARE COMPATIBILITY 87
B.2. SUPPORTED INSTALLATION TARGETS 87
B.3. SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS 87
B.4. DISK AND MEMORY REQUIREMENTS 88

3
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

B.5. RAID REQUIREMENTS 89

.APPENDIX
. . . . . . . . . . .C.
. . .PARTITIONING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REFERENCE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
..............
C.1. SUPPORTED DEVICE TYPES 91
C.2. SUPPORTED FILE SYSTEMS 91
C.3. SUPPORTED RAID TYPES 92
C.4. RECOMMENDED PARTITIONING SCHEME 93
C.5. ADVICE ON PARTITIONS 95

.APPENDIX
. . . . . . . . . . .D.
. . .BOOT
. . . . . . OPTIONS
. . . . . . . . . . .REFERENCE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
..............
D.1. INSTALLATION SOURCE BOOT OPTIONS 98
D.2. NETWORK BOOT OPTIONS 102
Additional resources 104
D.3. CONSOLE BOOT OPTIONS 104
D.4. DEBUG BOOT OPTIONS 107
D.5. STORAGE BOOT OPTIONS 108
D.6. DEPRECATED BOOT OPTIONS 109
D.7. REMOVED BOOT OPTIONS 110

. . . . . . .II.. .INSTALLING
PART . . . . . . . . . . . . . RED
. . . . . HAT
. . . . . ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . . POWER
. . . . . . . . .SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . .LC
. . . SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
..............

. . . . . . . . . . . 8.
CHAPTER . . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .LC
. . .SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
..............
8.1. OVERVIEW 113
Additional Resources 113
8.1.1. Creating a bootable USB device on Linux 113
Prerequisites 113
Procedure 113
8.1.2. Creating a bootable USB device on Windows 115
Prerequisites 115
Procedure 115
8.1.3. Creating a bootable USB device on Mac OS X 116
Prerequisites 116
Procedure 116
8.2. COMPLETING THE PREREQUISITES AND BOOTING YOUR FIRMWARE 117
8.3. CONFIGURING THE IP ADDRESS IBM POWER 118
8.4. POWERING ON YOUR SERVER WITH IPMI 118
8.5. CHOOSE YOUR INSTALLATION METHOD ON IBM LC SERVERS 119
8.5.1. Configuring Petitboot for installation with USB device 119
8.5.2. Access BMC Advanced System Management interface to configure virtual media 121
8.6. COMPLETING YOUR LC SERVER INSTALLATION 122

. . . . . . .III.
PART . . INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . IBM
. . . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .AC
. . . SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
...............

. . . . . . . . . . . 9.
CHAPTER . . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .ACCELERATED
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SERVERS
......................
124
9.1. OVERVIEW 124
Additional resources 124
9.2. COMPLETING THE PREREQUISITES AND BOOTING YOUR FIRMWARE 124
9.3. CONFIGURING THE FIRMWARE IP ADDRESS 125
9.4. POWERING ON YOUR SERVER WITH OPENBMC COMMANDS 126
9.5. CHOOSE YOUR INSTALLATION METHOD ON IBM ACCELERATED SERVERS 127
9.6. CONFIGURING PETITBOOT FOR NETWORK INSTALLATION 127
9.7. CONFIGURING PETITBOOT FOR INSTALLATION WITH USB DEVICE ON ACCELERATED SERVERS 128
9.8. COMPLETING YOUR ACCELERATED SERVER INSTALLATION 129

4
Table of Contents

. . . . . . .IV.
PART . . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . RED
. . . . . HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . . POWER
. . . . . . . . .SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . .L. .SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
...............

. . . . . . . . . . . 10.
CHAPTER . . . INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . LINUX
. . . . . . . .ON
. . . IBM
. . . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .L. SERVER
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
..............
10.1. OVERVIEW 131
10.2. COMPLETING THE PREREQUISITES AND BOOTING YOUR FIRMWARE ON L SERVER 131
10.3. CONNECTING TO ASMI WITH DHCP 132
10.4. CONNECTING TO ASMI WITH STATIC IP ADDRESS 132
10.5. ENABLING IPMI 134
10.6. POWERING ON YOUR L SERVER WITH IPMI 134
10.7. POWERING ON YOUR SYSTEM FROM A NOTEBOOK OR PC RUNNING LINUX 135
10.8. POWERING ON YOUR SYSTEM FROM A NOTEBOOK OR PC RUNNING WINDOWS 136
10.9. CONFIGURING PETITBOOT AND INSTALLING RED HAT ENTERPRISE LINUX 136

. . . . . . .V.
PART . . INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . LINUX
. . . . . . . ON
. . . . IBM
. . . . .Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
...............

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 11.
. . .PREPARING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .FOR
. . . . .INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . .Z
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
...............
11.1. OVERVIEW OF THE IBM Z INSTALLATION PROCESS 139
11.2. CUSTOMIZING BOOT PARAMETERS 139
11.3. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION 141
11.3.1. Booting the installation 141
11.4. PLANNING FOR INSTALLATION ON IBM Z 141
11.4.1. Pre-installation 141
Additional Resources 142
11.5. INSTALLING UNDER Z/VM 142
11.6. USING PARAMETER AND CONFIGURATION FILES ON IBM Z 144
11.7. REQUIRED CONFIGURATION FILE PARAMETERS ON IBM Z 144
11.8. IBM Z/VM CONFIGURATION FILE 145
11.9. INSTALLATION NETWORK PARAMETERS ON IBM Z 145
11.10. PARAMETERS FOR KICKSTART INSTALLATIONS ON IBM Z 148
11.11. MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS ON IBM Z 149
11.12. SAMPLE PARAMETER FILE AND CMS CONFIGURATION FILE ON IBM Z 150

. . . . . . . . . . . 12.
CHAPTER . . . CONFIGURING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A. .LINUX
. . . . . . . INSTANCE
. . . . . . . . . . . .ON
. . . IBM
. . . . .Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
..............
12.1. ADDING DASDS 151
12.2. DYNAMICALLY SETTING DASDS ONLINE 151
12.3. PREPARING A NEW DASD WITH LOW-LEVEL FORMATTING 152
12.4. PERSISTENTLY SETTING DASDS ONLINE 153
12.5. DASDS THAT ARE PART OF THE ROOT FILE SYSTEM 153
12.6. FCP LUNS THAT ARE PART OF THE ROOT FILE SYSTEM 155
12.7. FCP LUNS THAT ARE NOT PART OF THE ROOT FILE SYSTEM 157
12.8. ADDING A QETH DEVICE 158
12.9. DYNAMICALLY ADDING A QETH DEVICE 158
12.10. PERSISTENTLY ADDING A QETH DEVICE 160
12.11. CONFIGURING AN IBM Z NETWORK DEVICE FOR NETWORK ROOT FILE SYSTEM 163

5
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

6
PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON RED HAT DOCUMENTATION

PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON RED HAT DOCUMENTATION


We appreciate your input on our documentation. Please let us know how we could make it better. To do
so:

For simple comments on specific passages, make sure you are viewing the documentation in the
Multi-page HTML format. Highlight the part of text that you want to comment on. Then, click
the Add Feedback pop-up that appears below the highlighted text, and follow the displayed
instructions.

For submitting more complex feedback, create a Bugzilla ticket:

1. Go to the Bugzilla website.

2. As the Component, use Documentation.

3. Fill in the Description field with your suggestion for improvement. Include a link to the
relevant part(s) of documentation.

4. Click Submit Bug.

7
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 delivers a stable, secure, consistent foundation across hybrid cloud
deployments with the tools needed to deliver workloads faster with less effort. It can be deployed as a
guest on supported hypervisors and Cloud provider environments as well as deployed on physical
infrastructure, so your applications can take advantage of innovations in the leading hardware
architecture platforms.

1.1. SUPPORTED ARCHITECTURES


Red Hat Enterprise Linux supports the following architectures:

AMD and Intel 64-bit architectures

The 64-bit ARM architecture

IBM Power Systems, Little Endian

IBM Z

1.2. INSTALLATION TERMINOLOGY


This section describes Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation terminology. Different terminology can be
used for the same concepts, depending on its upstream or downstream origin.

Anaconda: The operating system installer used in Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and their
derivatives. Anaconda is a set of Python modules and scripts with additional files like Gtk widgets
(written in C), systemd units, and dracut libraries. Together, they form a tool that allows users to set
parameters of the resulting (target) system. In this document, the term installation program refers to
the installation aspect of Anaconda.

8
CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION METHODS

CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION METHODS


You can install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using one of the following methods:

Quick install
Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures using the
graphical user interface. The quick installation assumes that you are familiar with Red Hat
Enterprise Linux and your environment, and that you can accept the default settings provided by the
installation program.
Graphical install
Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface and customize the graphical
settings for your specific requirements.
Automated install
Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using Kickstart. The automated installation allows you to perform
unattended operating system installation tasks.

Additional resources
To perform a graphical installation on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures using the
graphical user interface, see Chapter 3, Installation workflow.

To perform an installation on IBM Power System LC servers, see Section 8.1, “Overview”.

To perform an installation on IBM Power System AC servers, see Section 9.1, “Overview”.

To perform an installation on IBM Power System L servers, see Section 10.1, “Overview”.

To perform an installation on IBM Z, see Section 11.1, “Overview of the IBM Z installation
process”.

To perform an automated install using Kickstart, see the Performing an advanced RHEL
installation document.

2.1. PERFORMING A QUICK INSTALL ON AMD64, INTEL 64, AND 64-


BIT ARM
Follow this procedure to perform a quick installation on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures
using the graphical user interface. To complete this procedure you must be familiar with Red Hat
Enterprise Linux and your environment, and you must be able to accept the default settings provided by
the installation program.

Prerequisites

You have downloaded the required ISO image file. See Section 4.5, “Downloading the
installation ISO image” for more information.

You have created bootable installation media. See Section 4.6, “Creating installation media” for
more information.

You have booted the installation program and the boot menu is displayed. See Chapter 5,
Booting the installation for more information.

Procedure

9
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

1. From the boot menu, select Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0.

2. Press the Enter key on your keyboard.

3. From the Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0window, select your language and
location.

4. Click Continue to proceed to the Installation Summary window.

NOTE

The Installation Summary window is the central hub that you can use to
configure the Red Hat Enterprise Linux graphical user interface. The default
settings assigned by the installation program are displayed under each category.

5. From the Installation Summary window, accept the default Localization and Software options.

6. Select System > Installation Destination.

a. From the Local Standard Disks pane, select the target disk.

b. Click Done to accept the selection and the default setting of automatic partitioning, and
return to the Installation Summary window.

7. Select Network & Host Name.

a. Toggle the Ethernet switch to ON to enable network configuration.

i. Optional: Select a network device and click Configure to update the network interface
configuration.

b. Click Done to accept the changes and return to the Installation Summary window.

8. Optional: Select Security Policy.

a. Select the profile that you require, and click Select profile.

b. Click Done to accept the changes and return to the Installation Summary window.

9. Optional: Select System Purpose.

a. Select the role, service level agreement, and usage.

b. Click Done to accept the changes and return to the Installation Summary window.

10. Click Begin Installation to start the installation.

11. From the Configuration window, configure a root password and create a user account.

12. When the installation process is complete, click Reboot to restart the system.

13. From the Initial Setup window, accept the licensing agreement and register your system.

Additional resources

To learn more about how to prepare for your installation, see Chapter 4, Preparing for your
installation.

10
CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION METHODS

To learn more about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface, and
customizing the interface settings, see Section 6.1, “Graphical installation workflow”.

To learn more about how to register your system, see Chapter 7, Completing post-installation
tasks.

11
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

PART I. PERFORMING A GRAPHICAL INSTALL ON AMD64,


INTEL 64, AND 64-BIT ARM
This section describes how to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM
architectures using the graphical user interface.

12
CHAPTER 3. INSTALLATION WORKFLOW

CHAPTER 3. INSTALLATION WORKFLOW


This installation workflow contains the high-level steps for installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on
AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures using the graphical user interface.

Procedure

1. Prepare for your installation by checking your system and hardware requirements, downloading
an installation image file, and creating bootable installation media.

2. Boot the installation program and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user
interface.

3. Complete post-installation tasks such as initial setup and system registration.

Additional resources

For more information about preparing for your installation, see Chapter 4, Preparing for your
installation.

For more information about booting the installation program, see Chapter 5, Booting the
installation.

For more information about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user
interface, see Chapter 6, Installing RHEL using the Graphical User Interface

For more information about completing post-installation tasks, see Chapter 7, Completing post-
installation tasks.

13
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION


If you are new to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, it is important to prepare for your installation by reviewing
system requirements, downloading the required installation image, and creating installation media.

4.1. RECOMMENDED STEPS


Preparing for your installation consists of several steps.

NOTE

If you are new to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, complete steps 1 to 5.

If you are familiar with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, complete steps 3 to 5.

Procedure

1. Check system requirements.

2. Choose an installation boot method.

3. Select and download the installation image.

4. Create bootable installation media.

5. Prepare the installation source*

*Only required for the Boot ISO (minimal install) image.

4.2. CHECK SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS


If this is a first-time installation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux it is recommended that you review the
guidelines provided for system, hardware, security, memory, and RAID before installing. See Appendix B,
System requirements reference for more information.

Additional resources
For more information about securing Red Hat Enterprise Linux, see the Security hardening document.

4.3. CHOOSE AN INSTALLATION BOOT METHOD


There are several methods to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation program. The method you
choose depends on your installation media.

Full installation DVD or USB flash drive


Create a full installation DVD or USB flash drive using the Binary DVD ISO image. The DVD or USB
flash drive can be used as a boot device and as an installation source for installing software packages.
Due to the size of the Binary DVD ISO image, a DVD or USB flash drive are the recommended media
types.
Minimal installation DVD, CD, or USB flash drive
Create a minimal installation CD, DVD, or USB flash drive using the Boot ISO image, which contains
only the minimum files necessary to boot the system and start the installation program. The Boot
ISO image requires an installation source that contains the required software packages.
PXE Server

14
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

A preboot execution environment (PXE) server allows the installation program to boot over the
network. After a system boot, you must complete the installation from a different installation source,
such as a local hard drive or a network location.

Additional Resources

For instructions on how to create an installation DVD or USB flash drive, see Section 4.6,
“Creating installation media” for more information.

For instructions on how to create a bootable DVD, CD, and USB flash drive, see Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

For more information about PXE servers, see the Performing an advanced RHEL installation
document.

4.4. SELECT THE REQUIRED INSTALLATION IMAGE


Two Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 installation images are available from the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Binary DVD ISO image file


A full installation program that contains the BaseOS and AppStream repositories and allows you to
complete the installation without additional repositories. Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the
Binary DVD ISO is the easiest and the recommended method of performing a standard RHEL
installation.

IMPORTANT

It is recommended that you use the Binary DVD ISO image file to install
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

You can use a Binary DVD for IBM Z to boot the installation program using a
SCSI DVD drive, or as an installation source.

Boot ISO image file


The Boot ISO image is a minimal installation that requires access to the BaseOS and AppStream
repositories to install software packages. The repositories are part of the Binary DVD ISO image that
is available for download from https://access.redhat.com/home. Download and unpack the Binary
DVD ISO image to access the repositories.

The following table contains information about the images that are available for the supported
architectures.

Table 4.1. Boot and Installation Images

Architecture Installation DVD Boot DVD

AMD64 and Intel 64 x86_64 Binary DVD ISO image file x86_64 Boot ISO image file

ARM 64 AArch64 Binary DVD ISO image AArch64 Boot ISO image file
file

15
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

Architecture Installation DVD Boot DVD

IBM POWER ppc64le Binary DVD ISO image ppc64le Boot ISO image file
file

IBM Z s390x Binary DVD ISO image file s390x Boot ISO image file

Additional Resources

For instructions on how to access the Binary DVD ISO image repositories, see Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

4.5. DOWNLOADING THE INSTALLATION ISO IMAGE


This section contains instructions about downloading a Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation image from
the Red Hat Customer Portal or by using the curl command.

4.5.1. Downloading an ISO image from the Customer Portal


Follow this procedure to download a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 ISO image from the Red Hat Customer
Portal.

NOTE

Red Hat recommends using the Binary DVD ISO image to install Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 8 as it contains all repositories and software packages, and does
not require any additional configuration.

If you download the Boot ISO image file, you must configure an installation
source to obtain the repositories and software packages. See Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

Prerequisites

You have an active Red Hat subscription.

You are logged in to the Product Downloads section of the Red Hat Customer Portal at
https://access.redhat.com/downloads.

Procedure

1. From the Product Downloads page, select the By Category tab.

2. Click the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 link.


The Download Red Hat Enterprise Linuxweb page opens.

3. From the Product Variant drop-down menu, select the variant that you require, for example
Red Hat Enterprise Linux for x86_64.

NOTE
16
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

NOTE

If you are unsure of the variant for your requirements, see


http://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/linux-platforms/enterprise-linux.

4. The Version drop-down menu defaults to 8.0.

5. The Architecture drop-down menu defaults to x86_64.


The Product Software tab displays the images, which include:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Binary DVDimage.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Boot ISOimage.

Additional images may be available, for example, preconfigured virtual machine images, but they
are beyond the scope of this document.

6. Click Download Now beside the ISO image that you require.

4.5.2. Downloading an ISO image using curl


Use the curl command to download installation images directly from a specific URL.

Prerequisites

Verify the curl package is installed:

If your distribution uses the yum package manager:

# yum install curl

If your distribution uses the dnf package manager:

# dnf install curl

If your distribution uses the apt package manager:

# apt update
# apt install curl

If your Linux distribution does not use yum, dnf, or apt, or if you do not use Linux, download
the most appropriate software package from the curl web site.

You have navigated to the Product Downloads section of the Red Hat Customer Portal at
https://access.redhat.com/downloads, and selected the variant, version, and architecture that
you require. You have right-clicked on the required ISO image file, and selected Copy Link
Location to copy the URL of the ISO image file to your clipboard.

Procedure

1. On the command line, enter a suitable directory, and run the following command to download
the file:

$ curl --output directory-path/filename.iso 'copied_link_location'

17
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

Replace directory-path with a path to the location where you want to save the file; replace
filename.iso with the ISO image name as displayed in the Customer Portal; replace
copied_link_location with the link that you have copied from the Customer Portal.

4.6. CREATING INSTALLATION MEDIA


This section contains information about using the ISO image file that you downloaded in Section 4.5,
“Downloading the installation ISO image” to create bootable physical installation media, such as a USB,
DVD, or CD.

NOTE

By default, the inst.stage2= boot option is used on the installation media and is set to a
specific label, for example, inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=RHEL8\x86_64. If you modify the
default label of the file system containing the runtime image, or if you use a customized
procedure to boot the installation system, you must verify that the label is set to the
correct value.

4.6.1. Creating a bootable DVD or CD


You can create a bootable installation DVD or CD using burning software and a CD/DVD burner. The
exact steps to produce a DVD or CD from an ISO image file vary greatly, depending on the operating
system and disc burning software installed. Consult your system’s burning software documentation for
the exact steps to burn a CD or DVD from an ISO image file.


WARNING

You can create a bootable DVD or CD using either the Binary DVD ISO image (full
install), or the Boot ISO image (minimal install). However, the Binary DVD ISO
image is larger than 4.7 GB, and as a result, it might not fit on a single-layer DVD. A
dual-layer DVD or USB key is recommended when using the Binary DVD ISO image
to create bootable installation media.

4.6.2. Creating a bootable USB device on Linux


Follow this procedure to create a bootable USB device on a Linux system.

Prerequisites

You have downloaded an installation ISO image as described in Section 4.5, “Downloading the
installation ISO image”.

The Binary DVD ISO image is larger than 4.7 GB, so you must have a USB flash drive that is
large enough to hold the ISO image.

Procedure

NOTE
18
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

NOTE

This procedure is destructive and data on the USB flash drive is destroyed without a
warning.

1. Connect the USB flash drive to the system.

2. Open a terminal window and run the dmesg command:

$ dmesg

Using FedUp to Update an EFI Boot Stub System to Fedora 19

FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) is the new tool for upgrading existing Fedora installs in Fedora 18 and above releases. It replaces all the previously recommended upgrade methods, i.e. PreUpgrade, DVD, USB, etc., that were available in previous Fedora releases. By the way, the Anaconda installer was totally redesigned for Fedora 18 and no longer has built-in upgrade functionality in Fedora 18 or later releases. Such functionality was delegated to FedUp.

In this post, I demonstrate how to use FedUp to upgrade an EFI Boot Stub (EFISTUB) Fedora 18 system to an EFI Boot Stub Fedora 19 system. The EFI Boot Stub boot mechanism was first implemented in Linux kernel version 3.3.0 and provides for a significantly faster boot mechanism because a traditional EFI-aware bootloader, for example the Red Hat modified GRUB, GRUB2 and Gummiboot, is no longer required on a UEFI-enabled system.

FedUp is capable of upgrading Fedora 17 installs to Fedora 18 (Spherical Cow) or Fedora 19 (Schrödinger’s Cat), or Fedora 18 to Fedora 19 using a networked repository, similar to how PreUpgrade worked. This is the mechanism that I used. Other upgrade methods including an ISO file or DVD are supported but will not be discussed further in this post. You can find detailed information on all these methods in the FedUp Wiki.

Here is the EFI shell script which I used to boot Fedora 18 from the EFI shell prompt:

# cat /boot/efi/f18.nsh vmlinuz-3.9.5-201.fc18.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet initrd=.\initramfs-3.9.5-201.fc18.x86_64.img


I assume that you are fairly familiar with the EFI shell and EFI shell scripts if you are reading this post so I make no attempt to explain how to create such a script.

FedUp consists of two components – a client which prepares the system for the upgrade and a pre-boot environment which does the actual system upgrade using systemd and YUM. The FedUp client gathers the packages needed for upgrade in addition to downloading the required initramfs and kernel needed for the actual upgrade. Files are downloaded to /var/lib/fedora-upgrade, and are deleted after the upgrade process completes. The actual upgrade occurs when the system has been rebooted after preparing the system for the upgrade. Filesystems are mounted during boot, the already downloaded packages are installed and some upgrade-related tasks are performed. During the upgrade process, a special Plymouth theme is used which has a progress bar to indicate current upgrade progress. The final phase is the cleanup and removal of unnecessary files and packages.

To upgrade a system, you must first install a FedUp package. The version installed on my system was fedup-0.7.3-4.fc19.noarch.

$ rpm -ql fedup /etc/fedup /etc/fedup/update.img.d /etc/fedup/update.img.d/bug896023.img /usr/bin/fedup /usr/bin/fedup-cli /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup-0.7.3-py2.7.egg-info /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/__init__.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/__init__.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/__init__.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/boot.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/boot.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/boot.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/callback.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/callback.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/callback.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/commandline.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/commandline.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/commandline.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/conf.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/conf.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/conf.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/download.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/download.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/download.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/logutils.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/logutils.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/logutils.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/media.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/media.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/media.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/sysprep.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/sysprep.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/sysprep.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/textoutput.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/textoutput.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/textoutput.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/treeinfo.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/treeinfo.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/treeinfo.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/upgrade.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/upgrade.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/upgrade.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/util.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/util.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/util.pyo /usr/lib/systemd/system/system-upgrade.target /usr/lib/systemd/system/upgrade-prep.service /usr/lib/systemd/system/upgrade-switch-root.service /usr/lib/systemd/system/upgrade-switch-root.target /usr/lib/systemd/upgrade-prep.sh /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3 /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3/COPYING /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3/README.asciidoc /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3/TODO.asciidoc /usr/share/man/man8/fedup-cli.8.gz /usr/share/man/man8/fedup.8.gz


The contents of this RPM were not removed after the upgrade was completed.

Once you have installed the Fedup package, you can start the system upgrade using the following command:


You should check the /var/log/fedup.log file for any errors that occur in the preparation phase.

During the preparation stage of the upgrade the FedUp client installed the following three Fedup-related packages (and also numerous other packages). The Dracut-related files were installed on my system via the fedup-dracut.x86_64 0:0.7.3-1.fc19 package.

$ rpm -ql fedup-dracut /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/do-upgrade.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/keep-initramfs.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/module-setup.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/save-journal.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/upgrade-cleanup.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/README.txt /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/module-setup.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-debug-shell.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-init.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-post.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-post.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-pre-pivot.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-pre.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-pre.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade.target /usr/libexec/system-upgrade-fedora /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3 /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/COPYING /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/README.asciidoc /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/TODO.asciidoc /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/makefeduprepo


The contents of this RPM were removed after the upgrade completed.

The special FedUp Plymouth theme was installed via the fedup-dracut-plymouth.noarch 0:0.7.3-1.fc19 package.

$ rpm -ql fedup-dracut-plymouth /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-000.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-001.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-002.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-003.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-004.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-005.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-006.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/box.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/bullet.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/entry.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/fedup.plymouth /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/lock.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-000.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-001.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-002.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-003.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-004.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-005.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-006.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-007.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-008.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-009.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-010.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-011.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-012.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-013.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-014.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-015.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-016.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-017.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-018.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-019.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-020.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-021.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-022.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-023.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-024.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-025.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-026.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-027.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-028.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-029.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-030.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-031.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-032.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-033.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-034.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-035.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-036.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-037.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-038.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-039.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-040.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-041.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-042.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-043.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-044.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-045.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-046.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-047.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-048.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-049.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-050.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-051.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-052.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-053.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-054.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-055.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-056.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-057.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-058.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-059.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-060.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-061.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-062.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-063.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-064.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-065.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-066.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-067.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-068.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-069.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-070.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-071.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-072.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-073.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-074.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-075.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-076.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-077.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-078.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-079.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-080.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-081.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-082.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-083.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-084.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-085.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-086.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-087.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-088.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-089.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-090.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-091.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-092.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-093.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-094.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-095.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-096.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-097.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-098.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-099.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-100.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-101.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-102.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-103.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-104.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-105.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-106.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-107.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-108.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-109.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-110.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-111.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-112.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-113.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-114.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-115.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-116.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-117.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-118.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-119.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-120.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-121.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-122.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-123.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-124.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-000.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-001.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-002.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-003.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-004.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-005.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-006.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-007.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-008.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-009.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-010.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-011.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-012.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-013.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-014.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-015.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-016.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-017.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-018.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-019.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-020.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-021.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-022.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-023.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-024.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-025.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-026.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-027.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-028.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-029.png


The contents of this RPM were removed after the upgrade completed. You can see a demo of the Plymouth FedUp theme in action on my YouTube channel.

Once the first stage of the FedUp process has completed without major error, the second stage is invoked by rebooting your system. However do not reboot your system yet! Instead, as root, examine your /boot/efi/EFI/redhat/grub.conf file. It should contain a new menu stanza entitled “System Upgrade”. Take the contents of that stanza and create a new EFI shell script called /boot/efi/upgrade.nsh containing the appropriate EFISTUB command to invoke the special FedUp initramfs and kernel.

Here is what mine looked like:

# cat /boot/efi/fedup.nsh vmlinuz-fedup.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet upgrade systemd.unit=system-upgrade.target plymouth.splash=fedup selinux=0 initrd=.\initramfs-fedup.img


Note you will have to copy and rename both the vmlinux-fedup-* and the initramfs-fedup-* images from /boot to /boot/efi/.

After this is done, shutdown your system and boot it from your EFI shell using fedup.nsh. The system should boot into the upgrade process and a Plymouth FedUp boot screen should be displayed. If you press the ESC key, a more detailed information about the progress of the update will be displayed. If you switch back to the graphical progress indicator, it will remain at 0% for the remainder of the upgrade but that does not mean the upgrade has stopped. This is a “feature” of the current version of FedUp. Another way to view the progress of the upgrade is to enable the upgrade debugshell by appending rd.upgrade.debugshell to the kernel command line and and invoke journalctl -a -o cat.

Once the upgrade is completed, the system will automatically reboot. This is where you need to interrupt the reboot sequence at the GRUB prompt and modify the GRUB staza using the familiar kernel command line init=/bin/bash trick so that Fedora 19 boots into single user mode. You then need to create an EFI shell script (I called mine f19.nsh) andi then, as before, copy/rename the appropriate kernel and initramfs images from /boot to /boot/efi.

Here is the contents of my f19.nsh shell script:

# cat /boot/efi/f19.nsh vmlinuz-3.9.6-301.fc19.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet initrd=.\initramfs-3.9.6-301.fc19.x86_64.img

The upgrade journal is saved to /var/log/upgrade.journal, and also written to /var/log/upgrade.log for those who do not like the systemd journal approach.

# cd /var/log
# ls -alR upgrade.journal/
upgrade.journal/:
total 16
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 .
drwxr-xr-x. 21 root root 4096 Jun 23 06:30 ..
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 23 09:37 5dff8a4a65fc4da695a61adeb9fd402b
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 9b740bef3a774a0e9251ae6b0f0c8311

upgrade.journal/5dff8a4a65fc4da695a61adeb9fd402b:
total 2716
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 23 09:37 .
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 ..
-rw-r—– 1 root systemd-journal 2772992 Jun 22 22:51 system.journal

upgrade.journal/9b740bef3a774a0e9251ae6b0f0c8311:
total 6188
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 .
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 ..
-rw-r—– 1 root systemd-journal 6328320 Jun 22 23:47 system.journal

# cd 5dff8a4a65fc4da695a61adeb9fd402b
# journalctl -a -no-pager
G– Logs begin at Sun 2013-06-23 02:51:33 UTC, end at Sun 2013-06-23 03:47:41 UTC. —
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost systemd-journal[94]: Allowing runtime journal files to grow to 721.5M.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpu
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Linux version 3.9.2-301.fc19.x86_64 (mockbuild@bkernel01.phx2.fedoraproject.org) (gcc version 4.8.0 20130412 (Red Hat 4.8.0-2) (GCC) ) #1 SMP Mon May 13 12:36:24 UTC 2013
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Command line: vmlinuz-fedup.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet upgrade systemd.unit=system-upgrade.target plymouth.splash=fedup selinux=0 initrd=.\initramfs-fedup.img
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: BIOS-provided physical RAM map:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000009efff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000000009f000-0x000000000009ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x000000001fffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000020000000-0x00000000201fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000020200000-0x0000000040003fff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000040004000-0x0000000040004fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000040005000-0x0000000099f5bfff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000099f5c000-0x000000009a54dfff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a54e000-0x000000009a7cdfff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a7ce000-0x000000009a7d2fff] ACPI data
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a7d3000-0x000000009a815fff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a816000-0x000000009ae1ffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009ae20000-0x000000009aff1fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009aff2000-0x000000009affffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009b800000-0x000000009f9fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fbffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fed00000-0x00000000fed03fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fed1c000-0x00000000fed1ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000ff000000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x00000003feffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cd73f98-0x0cd73fbf] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cd75018-0x0cd85057] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cd86018-0x0cd92857] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cec5018-0x0cedc657] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cedd018-0x0cee9057] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: extended physical RAM map:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000009efff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000009f000-0x000000000009ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x000000000cd73f97] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd73f98-0x000000000cd73fbf] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd73fc0-0x000000000cd75017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd75018-0x000000000cd85057] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd85058-0x000000000cd86017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd86018-0x000000000cd92857] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd92858-0x000000000cec5017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cec5018-0x000000000cedc657] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cedc658-0x000000000cedd017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cedd018-0x000000000cee9057] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cee9058-0x000000001fffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000020000000-0x00000000201fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000020200000-0x0000000040003fff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000040004000-0x0000000040004fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000040005000-0x0000000099f5bfff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000099f5c000-0x000000009a54dfff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a54e000-0x000000009a7cdfff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a7ce000-0x000000009a7d2fff] ACPI data
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a7d3000-0x000000009a815fff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a816000-0x000000009ae1ffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009ae20000-0x000000009aff1fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009aff2000-0x000000009affffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009b800000-0x000000009f9fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fbffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fed00000-0x00000000fed03fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fed1c000-0x00000000fed1ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000ff000000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x00000003feffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NX (Execute Disable) protection: active
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: EFI v2.31 by American Megatrends
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: ACPI=0x9a7b1000 ACPI 2.0=0x9a7b1000 SMBIOS=0xf0480 MPS=0xfc8e0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem00: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000000000-0x0000000000008000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem01: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000008000-0x0000000000011000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem02: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000011000-0x0000000000058000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem03: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000058000-0x0000000000059000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem04: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000059000-0x000000000005f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem05: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000005f000-0x0000000000060000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem06: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000060000-0x000000000009f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem07: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000000009f000-0x00000000000a0000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem08: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000100000-0x0000000001000000) (15MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem09: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001000000-0x0000000001100000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem10: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001100000-0x0000000001a6f000) (9MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem11: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001a6f000-0x0000000001a7e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem12: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001a7e000-0x0000000001b7f000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem13: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b7f000-0x0000000001b82000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem14: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b82000-0x0000000001b86000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem15: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b86000-0x0000000001b87000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem16: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b87000-0x0000000001b92000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem17: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b92000-0x0000000001b93000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem18: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b93000-0x0000000001b96000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem19: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b96000-0x0000000001b97000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem20: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b97000-0x0000000001fe6000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem21: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fe6000-0x0000000001fe7000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem22: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fe7000-0x0000000001fec000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem23: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fec000-0x0000000001ff0000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem24: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ff0000-0x0000000001ff4000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem25: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ff4000-0x0000000001ff5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem26: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ff5000-0x0000000001ffa000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem27: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ffa000-0x0000000001ffb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem28: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ffb000-0x0000000001fff000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem29: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fff000-0x0000000002000000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem30: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002000000-0x0000000002001000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem31: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002001000-0x0000000002002000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem32: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002002000-0x0000000002003000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem33: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002003000-0x0000000002004000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem34: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002004000-0x0000000002006000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem35: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002006000-0x0000000002007000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem36: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002007000-0x000000000200c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem37: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000200c000-0x000000000200d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem38: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000200d000-0x000000000200f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem39: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000200f000-0x0000000002014000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem40: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002014000-0x000000000202a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem41: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000202a000-0x000000000202c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem42: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000202c000-0x0000000002030000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem43: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002030000-0x0000000002033000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem44: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002033000-0x000000000205a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem45: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000205a000-0x0000000002064000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem46: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002064000-0x000000000207e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem47: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000207e000-0x0000000002081000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem48: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002081000-0x0000000002086000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem49: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002086000-0x0000000002087000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem50: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002087000-0x0000000002088000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem51: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002088000-0x0000000002089000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem52: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002089000-0x000000000208c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem53: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000208c000-0x0000000002092000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem54: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002092000-0x0000000002099000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem55: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002099000-0x000000000209a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem56: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000209a000-0x000000000209c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem57: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000209c000-0x00000000020a0000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem58: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020a0000-0x00000000020a5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem59: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020a5000-0x00000000020a9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem60: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020a9000-0x00000000020af000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem61: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020af000-0x00000000020b1000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem62: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020b1000-0x00000000020b9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem63: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020b9000-0x00000000020bd000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem64: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020bd000-0x00000000020be000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem65: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020be000-0x00000000020bf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem66: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020bf000-0x00000000020c1000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem67: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c1000-0x00000000020c4000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem68: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c4000-0x00000000020c7000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem69: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c7000-0x00000000020c8000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem70: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c8000-0x00000000020cb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem71: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020cb000-0x00000000020ce000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem72: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020ce000-0x00000000020db000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem73: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020db000-0x00000000020dc000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem74: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020dc000-0x00000000020e9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem75: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020e9000-0x00000000020f2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem76: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020f2000-0x00000000020fb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem77: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020fb000-0x00000000020fe000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem78: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020fe000-0x0000000002102000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem79: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002102000-0x0000000002108000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem80: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002108000-0x000000000211b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem81: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000211b000-0x000000000211e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem82: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000211e000-0x0000000002122000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem83: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002122000-0x0000000002126000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem84: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002126000-0x0000000002133000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem85: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002133000-0x000000000213e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem86: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000213e000-0x0000000002149000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem87: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002149000-0x000000000214a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem88: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000214a000-0x0000000002150000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem89: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002150000-0x0000000002156000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem90: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002156000-0x000000000215c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem91: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000215c000-0x000000000215e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem92: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000215e000-0x0000000002162000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem93: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002162000-0x0000000002165000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem94: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002165000-0x000000000216e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem95: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000216e000-0x0000000002170000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem96: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002170000-0x000000000217b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem97: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000217b000-0x000000000217c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem98: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000217c000-0x000000000217d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem99: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000217d000-0x0000000002181000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem100: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002181000-0x0000000002199000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem101: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002199000-0x00000000021ad000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem102: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021ad000-0x00000000021ae000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem103: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021ae000-0x00000000021b6000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem104: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021b6000-0x00000000021b8000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem105: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021b8000-0x00000000021cc000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem106: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021cc000-0x00000000021d9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem107: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021d9000-0x00000000021df000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem108: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021df000-0x00000000021e3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem109: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021e3000-0x00000000021e6000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem110: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021e6000-0x00000000021e9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem111: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021e9000-0x00000000021ec000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem112: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021ec000-0x00000000021f5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem113: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021f5000-0x00000000021fb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem114: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021fb000-0x0000000002200000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem115: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002200000-0x0000000002202000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem116: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002202000-0x0000000002203000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem117: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002203000-0x0000000002205000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem118: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002205000-0x000000000220e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem119: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000220e000-0x0000000002213000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem120: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002213000-0x000000000221b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem121: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000221b000-0x0000000002226000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem122: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002226000-0x000000000222c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem123: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000222c000-0x0000000002234000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem124: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002234000-0x0000000002239000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem125: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002239000-0x000000000223b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem126: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000223b000-0x000000000223d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem127: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000223d000-0x000000000223f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem128: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000223f000-0x0000000002242000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem129: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002242000-0x0000000002244000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem130: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002244000-0x0000000002247000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem131: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002247000-0x000000000224d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem132: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000224d000-0x000000000225a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem133: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000225a000-0x000000000229b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem134: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000229b000-0x00000000022a3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem135: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022a3000-0x00000000022af000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem136: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022af000-0x00000000022bd000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem137: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022bd000-0x00000000022bf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem138: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022bf000-0x00000000022c1000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem139: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c1000-0x00000000022c2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem140: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c2000-0x00000000022c5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem141: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c5000-0x00000000022c8000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem142: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c8000-0x00000000022cd000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem143: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022cd000-0x00000000022cf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem144: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022cf000-0x00000000022d2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem145: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022d2000-0x00000000022d7000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem146: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022d7000-0x00000000022de000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem147: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022de000-0x00000000022e2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem148: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022e2000-0x00000000022ed000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem149: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022ed000-0x00000000022f3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem150: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022f3000-0x0000000002305000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem151: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002305000-0x0000000002307000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem152: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002307000-0x000000000232b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem153: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000232b000-0x000000000233f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem154: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000233f000-0x0000000002358000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem155: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002358000-0x0000000002365000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem156: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002365000-0x000000000ba17000) (150MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem157: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba17000-0x000000000ba1a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem158: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba1a000-0x000000000ba22000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem159: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba22000-0x000000000ba25000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem160: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba25000-0x000000000ba26000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem161: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba26000-0x000000000ba27000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem162: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba27000-0x000000000ba86000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem163: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba86000-0x000000000ba8b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem164: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba8b000-0x000000000ba91000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem165: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba91000-0x000000000ba95000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem166: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba95000-0x000000000ba9d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem167: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba9d000-0x000000000bab4000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem168: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000bab4000-0x000000000babc000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem169: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000babc000-0x000000000babf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem170: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000babf000-0x000000000cd73000) (18MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem171: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd73000-0x000000000cd74000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem172: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd74000-0x000000000cd75000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem173: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd75000-0x000000000cd93000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem174: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd93000-0x000000000cd96000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem175: type=1, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd96000-0x000000000cec5000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem176: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cec5000-0x000000000ceea000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem177: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ceea000-0x000000000d398000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem178: type=1, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000d398000-0x000000000d86a000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem179: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000d86a000-0x000000000e000000) (7MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem180: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000e000000-0x000000000f3e5000) (19MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem181: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000f3e5000-0x0000000020000000) (268MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem182: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000020000000-0x0000000020200000) (2MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem183: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000020200000-0x0000000040004000) (510MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem184: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000040004000-0x0000000040005000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem185: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000040005000-0x000000007e2e0000) (994MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem186: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000007e2e0000-0x0000000080000000) (29MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem187: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000080000000-0x0000000099f5c000) (415MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem188: type=5, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099f5c000-0x0000000099f68000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem189: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099f68000-0x0000000099f75000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem190: type=5, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099f75000-0x0000000099faf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem191: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099faf000-0x000000009a00f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem192: type=5, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009a00f000-0x000000009a024000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem193: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009a024000-0x000000009a032000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem194: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009a032000-0x000000009a04e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem195: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a04e000-0x000000009a3a2000) (3MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem196: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a3a2000-0x000000009a4e3000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem197: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a4e3000-0x000000009a4ec000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem198: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a4ec000-0x000000009a54e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem199: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a54e000-0x000000009a725000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem200: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a725000-0x000000009a7c2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem201: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7c2000-0x000000009a7c9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem202: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7c9000-0x000000009a7ce000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem203: type=9, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7ce000-0x000000009a7d2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem204: type=9, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7d2000-0x000000009a7d3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem205: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7d3000-0x000000009a816000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem206: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a816000-0x000000009a95f000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem207: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a95f000-0x000000009adf5000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem208: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009adf5000-0x000000009ae04000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem209: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae04000-0x000000009ae16000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem210: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae16000-0x000000009ae17000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem211: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae17000-0x000000009ae19000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem212: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae19000-0x000000009ae20000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem213: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009ae20000-0x000000009aff2000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem214: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009aff2000-0x000000009b000000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem215: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000100000000-0x00000003ff000000) (12272MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem216: type=0, attr=0x8000000000000000, range=[0x000000009b800000-0x000000009fa00000) (66MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem217: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fc000000) (64MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem218: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec01000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem219: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fed00000-0x00000000fed04000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem220: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fed1c000-0x00000000fed20000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem221: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee01000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem222: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000ff000000-0x0000000100000000) (16MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: SMBIOS 2.7 present.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMI: BIOSTAR Group TZ77MXE/TZ77MXE, BIOS 4.6.5 04/25/2012
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x00000000-0x00000fff] usable ==> reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: remove [mem 0x000a0000-0x000fffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: No AGP bridge found
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: last_pfn = 0x3ff000 max_arch_pfn = 0x400000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: MTRR default type: uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: MTRR fixed ranges enabled:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 00000-9FFFF write-back
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: A0000-BFFFF uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: C0000-DBFFF write-protect
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DC000-DFFFF uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: E0000-FFFFF write-protect
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: MTRR variable ranges enabled:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 0 base 000000000 mask C00000000 write-back
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 1 base 0C0000000 mask FC0000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 2 base 0A0000000 mask FE0000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 3 base 09C000000 mask FFC000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 4 base 09B800000 mask FFF800000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 5 base 3FF000000 mask FFF000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 6 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 7 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 8 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 9 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: x86 PAT enabled: cpu 0, old 0x7040600070406, new 0x7010600070106
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: original variable MTRRs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 0, base: 0GB, range: 16GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 1, base: 3GB, range: 1GB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 2, base: 2560MB, range: 512MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 3, base: 2496MB, range: 64MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 4, base: 2488MB, range: 8MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 5, base: 16368MB, range: 16MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: total RAM covered: 14760M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Found optimal setting for mtrr clean up
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: gran_size: 64K chunk_size: 128M num_reg: 7 lose cover RAM: 0G
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: New variable MTRRs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 0, base: 0GB, range: 2GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 1, base: 2GB, range: 512MB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 2, base: 2488MB, range: 8MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 3, base: 2496MB, range: 64MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 4, base: 4GB, range: 4GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 5, base: 8GB, range: 8GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 6, base: 16368MB, range: 16MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x9b800000-0xffffffff] usable ==> reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: last_pfn = 0x9b000 max_arch_pfn = 0x400000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: found SMP MP-table at [mem 0x000fcc30-0x000fcc3f] mapped at [ffff8800000fcc30]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Base memory trampoline at [ffff880000098000] 98000 size 24576
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc4000, 0x0ffc4fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc5000, 0x0ffc5fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc6000, 0x0ffc6fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x3fee00000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x3fee00000-0x3feffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc7000, 0x0ffc7fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x3fc000000-0x3fedfffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x3fc000000-0x3fedfffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x380000000-0x3fbffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x380000000-0x3fbffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc8000, 0x0ffc8fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x00100000-0x1fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x00100000-0x001fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x00200000-0x1fffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x20200000-0x40003fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x20200000-0x3fffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x40000000-0x40003fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x40005000-0x99f5bfff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x40005000-0x401fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x40200000-0x99dfffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99e00000-0x99f5bfff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9a816000-0x9ae1ffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9a816000-0x9a9fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9aa00000-0x9adfffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9ae00000-0x9ae1ffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9aff2000-0x9affffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9aff2000-0x9affffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x100000000-0x37fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x100000000-0x37fffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: RAMDISK: [mem 0x7e2e0000-0x7fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: RSDP 000000009a7b1000 00024 (v02 ALASKA)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: XSDT 000000009a7b1070 00064 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: FACP 000000009a7ba928 000F4 (v04 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: DSDT 000000009a7b1170 097B8 (v02 ALASKA A M I 00000015 INTL 20051117)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: FACS 000000009a7ccf80 00040
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: APIC 000000009a7baa20 00072 (v03 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: MCFG 000000009a7baa98 0003C (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 MSFT 00000097)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: HPET 000000009a7baad8 00038 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI. 00000005)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: SSDT 000000009a7bab10 00460 (v01 IdeRef IdeTable 00001000 INTL 20091112)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: SSDT 000000009a7baf70 009AA (v01 PmRef Cpu0Ist 00003000 INTL 20051117)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: SSDT 000000009a7bb920 00A92 (v01 PmRef CpuPm 00003000 INTL 20051117)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: BGRT 000000009a7bc3b8 00038 (v00 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: No NUMA configuration found
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Faking a node at [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x00000003feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initmem setup node 0 [mem 0x00000000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NODE_DATA [mem 0x3fefdc000-0x3fefeffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [ffffea0000000000-ffffea000fffffff] PMD -> [ffff8803efe00000-ffff8803fe5fffff] on node 0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Zone ranges:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA [mem 0x00001000-0x00ffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA32 [mem 0x01000000-0xffffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Normal [mem 0x100000000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Movable zone start for each node
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Early memory node ranges
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x00001000-0x0009efff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x00100000-0x1fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x20200000-0x40003fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x40005000-0x99f5bfff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x9a816000-0x9ae1ffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x9aff2000-0x9affffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x100000000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: On node 0 totalpages: 3773201
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA zone: 64 pages used for memmap
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA zone: 25 pages reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA zone: 3998 pages, LIFO batch:0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA32 zone: 9806 pages used for memmap
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA32 zone: 627571 pages, LIFO batch:31
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Normal zone: 49088 pages used for memmap
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Normal zone: 3141632 pages, LIFO batch:31
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: PM-Timer IO Port: 0x408
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x01] lapic_id[0x00] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x02] lapic_id[0x02] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x03] lapic_id[0x04] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x04] lapic_id[0x06] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC_NMI (acpi_id[0xff] high edge lint[0x1])
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IOAPIC (id[0x02] address[0xfec00000] gsi_base[0])
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: IOAPIC[0]: apic_id 2, version 32, address 0xfec00000, GSI 0-23
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 0 global_irq 2 dfl dfl)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 9 global_irq 9 high level)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IRQ0 used by override.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IRQ2 used by override.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IRQ9 used by override.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Using ACPI (MADT) for SMP configuration information
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: HPET id: 0x8086a701 base: 0xfed00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: Allowing 4 CPUs, 0 hotplug CPUs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: nr_irqs_gsi: 40
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000009f000 – 00000000000a0000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000000a0000 – 0000000000100000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd73000 – 000000000cd74000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd73000 – 000000000cd74000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd75000 – 000000000cd76000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd85000 – 000000000cd86000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd86000 – 000000000cd87000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd92000 – 000000000cd93000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cec5000 – 000000000cec6000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cedc000 – 000000000cedd000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cedd000 – 000000000cede000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cee9000 – 000000000ceea000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 0000000020000000 – 0000000020200000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 0000000040004000 – 0000000040005000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 0000000099f5c000 – 000000009a54e000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009a54e000 – 000000009a7ce000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009a7ce000 – 000000009a7d3000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009a7d3000 – 000000009a816000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009ae20000 – 000000009aff2000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009b000000 – 000000009b800000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009b800000 – 000000009fa00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009fa00000 – 00000000f8000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000f8000000 – 00000000fc000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fc000000 – 00000000fec00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fec00000 – 00000000fec01000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fec01000 – 00000000fed00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed00000 – 00000000fed04000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed04000 – 00000000fed1c000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed1c000 – 00000000fed20000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed20000 – 00000000fee00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fee00000 – 00000000fee01000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fee01000 – 00000000ff000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000ff000000 – 0000000100000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: [mem 0x9fa00000-0xf7ffffff] available for PCI devices
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Booting paravirtualized kernel on bare hardware
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: setup_percpu: NR_CPUS:128 nr_cpumask_bits:128 nr_cpu_ids:4 nr_node_ids:1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PERCPU: Embedded 28 pages/cpu @ffff8803fec00000 s85120 r8192 d21376 u524288
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: pcpu-alloc: s85120 r8192 d21376 u524288 alloc=1*2097152
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: pcpu-alloc: [0] 0 1 2 3
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Built 1 zonelists in Zone order, mobility grouping on. Total pages: 3714218
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Policy zone: Normal
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Kernel command line: vmlinuz-fedup.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet upgrade systemd.unit=system-upgrade.target plymouth.splash=fedup selinux=0 initrd=.\initramfs-fedup.img
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PID hash table entries: 4096 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: __ex_table already sorted, skipping sort
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: xsave: enabled xstate_bv 0x7, cntxt size 0x340
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Checking aperture…
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: No AGP bridge found
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Memory: 14542856k/16760832k available (6471k kernel code, 1668028k absent, 549948k reserved, 6766k data, 1352k init)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: SLUB: Genslabs=15, HWalign=64, Order=0-3, MinObjects=0, CPUs=4, Nodes=1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Hierarchical RCU implementation.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: RCU restricting CPUs from NR_CPUS=128 to nr_cpu_ids=4.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NR_IRQS:8448 nr_irqs:712 16
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Console: colour dummy device 80×25
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: console [tty0] enabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: allocated 60817408 bytes of page_cgroup
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: please try ‘cgroup_disable=memory’ option if you don’t want memory cgroups
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: hpet clockevent registered
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: tsc: Fast TSC calibration using PIT
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: tsc: Detected 3092.888 MHz processor
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Calibrating delay loop (skipped), value calculated using timer frequency.. 6185.77 BogoMIPS (lpj=3092888)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: pid_max: default: 32768 minimum: 301
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99f5c000-0x99f67fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99f5c000-0x99f67fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99f68000-0x99f74fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99f68000-0x99f74fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99f75000-0x99faefff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99f75000-0x99faefff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99faf000-0x9a00efff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99faf000-0x9a00efff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9a00f000-0x9a023fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9a00f000-0x9a023fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9a024000-0x9a04dfff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9a024000-0x9a04dfff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9ae20000-0x9aff1fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9ae20000-0x9aff1fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9b800000-0x9f9fffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9b800000-0x9f9fffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Security Framework initialized
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: SELinux: Disabled at boot.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Dentry cache hash table entries: 2097152 (order: 12, 16777216 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Inode-cache hash table entries: 1048576 (order: 11, 8388608 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Mount-cache hash table entries: 256
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuacct
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys memory
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys devices
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys freezer
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys net_cls
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys blkio
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys perf_event
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: CPU: Physical Processor ID: 0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: CPU: Processor Core ID: 0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ENERGY_PERF_BIAS: Set to ‘normal’, was ‘performance’
ENERGY_PERF_BIAS: View and update with x86_energy_perf_policy(8)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: mce: CPU supports 9 MCE banks
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: CPU0: Thermal monitoring enabled (TM1)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Last level iTLB entries: 4KB 512, 2MB 0, 4MB 0
Last level dTLB entries: 4KB 512, 2MB 32, 4MB 32
tlb_flushall_shift: 1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Freeing SMP alternatives: 24k freed
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: Core revision 20130117
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: All ACPI Tables successfully acquired
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ftrace: allocating 24403 entries in 96 pages
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ..TIMER: vector=0x30 apic1=0 pin1=2 apic2=-1 pin2=-1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: CPU0: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3450 CPU @ 3.10GHz (fam: 06, model: 3a, stepping: 09)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: TSC deadline timer enabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Performance Events: PEBS fmt1+, 16-deep LBR, IvyBridge events, Intel PMU driver.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … version: 3
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … bit width: 48
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … generic registers: 8
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … value mask: 0000ffffffffffff
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … max period: 000000007fffffff
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … fixed-purpose events: 3
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … event mask: 00000007000000ff
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NMI watchdog: enabled on all CPUs, permanently consumes one hw-PMU counter.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: Booting Node 0, Processors #1 #2 #3 OK
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Brought up 4 CPUs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: Total of 4 processors activated (24743.10 BogoMIPS)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: devtmpfs: initialized
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0x9a54e000-0x9a7cdfff] (2621440 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0x9a7d3000-0x9a815fff] (274432 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: atomic64 test passed for x86-64 platform with CX8 and with SSE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: RTC time: 2:51:30, date: 06/23/13
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NET: Registered protocol family 16
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: bus type PCI registered
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PCI: MMCONFIG for domain 0000 [bus 00-3f] at [mem 0xf8000000-0xfbffffff] (base 0xf8000000)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PCI: MMCONFIG at [mem 0xf8000000-0xfbffffff] reserved in E820
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PCI: Using configuration type 1 for base access
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: bio: create slab

Источник: https://blog.fpmurphy.com/2013/07/using-fedup-to-update-an-efi-boot-stub-system-to-fedora-19.html

Media Player Classic 1.8Product Key - Crack Key For U -

tail
[288954.686557] usb 2-1.8: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=1, SerialNumber=2
[288954.686559] usb 2-1.8: Product: USB Storage
[288954.686562] usb 2-1.8: SerialNumber: 000000009225
[288954.712590] usb-storage 2-1.8:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected
[288954.712687] scsi host6: usb-storage 2-1.8:1.0
[288954.712809] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage
[288954.716682] usbcore: registered new interface driver uas
[288955.717140] scsi 6:0:0:0: Direct-Access Generic STORAGE DEVICE 9228 PQ: 0
ANSI: 0
[288955.717745] sd 6:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg4 type 0
[288961.876382] sd 6:0:0:0: sdd Attached SCSI removable disk

6. Run the dd command to write the ISO image directly to the USB device.

# dd if=/image_directory/image.iso of=/dev/device

Replace /image_directory/image.iso with the full path to the ISO image file that you
downloaded, and replace device with the device name that you retrieved with the dmesg
command. In this example, the full path to the ISO image is /home/testuser/Downloads/rhel-8-
x86_64-boot.iso, and the device name is sdd:

# dd if=/home/testuser/Downloads/rhel-8-x86_64-boot.iso of=/dev/sdd

NOTE

Ensure that you use the correct device name, and not the name of a partition on
the device. Partition names are usually device names with a numerical suffix. For
example, sdd is a device name, and sdd1 is the name of a partition on the device
sdd.

19
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

7. Wait for the dd command to finish writing the image to the device. The data transfer is
complete when the # prompt appears. When the prompt is displayed, log out of the root
account and unplug the USB drive. The USB drive is now ready to be used as a boot device.

4.6.3. Creating a bootable USB device on Windows


Follow the steps in this procedure to create a bootable USB device on a Windows system. The
procedure varies depending on the tool. Red Hat recommends using Fedora Media Writer, available for
download at https://github.com/FedoraQt/MediaWriter/releases.

NOTE

Fedora Media Writer is a community product and is not supported by Red Hat. You can
report any issues with the tool at https://github.com/FedoraQt/MediaWriter/issues.

Prerequisites

You have downloaded an installation ISO image as described in Section 4.5, “Downloading the
installation ISO image”.

The Binary DVD ISO image is larger than 4.7 GB, so you must have a USB flash drive that is
large enough to hold the ISO image.

Procedure

NOTE

This procedure is destructive and data on the USB flash drive is destroyed without a
warning.

1. Download and install Fedora Media Writer from


https://github.com/FedoraQt/MediaWriter/releases.

NOTE

To install Fedora Media Writer on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, use the pre-built
Flatpak package. You can obtain the package from the official Flatpak repository
Flathub.org at https://flathub.org/apps/details/org.fedoraproject.MediaWriter.

2. Connect the USB flash drive to the system.

3. Open Fedora Media Writer.

4. From the main window, click Custom Image and select the previously downloaded Red Hat
Enterprise Linux ISO image.

5. From Write Custom Image window, select the drive that you want to use.

6. Click Write to disk. The boot media creation process starts. Do not unplug the drive until the
operation completes. The operation may take several minutes, depending on the size of the ISO
image, and the write speed of the USB drive.

7. When the operation completes, unmount the USB drive. The USB drive is now ready to be used
as a boot device.

20
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

4.6.4. Creating a bootable USB device on Mac OS X


Follow the steps in this procedure to create a bootable USB device on a Mac OS X system.

Prerequisites

You have downloaded an installation ISO image as described in Section 4.5, “Downloading the
installation ISO image”.

The Binary DVD ISO image is larger than 4.7 GB, so you must have a USB flash drive that is
large enough to hold the ISO image.

Procedure

NOTE

This procedure is destructive and data on the USB flash drive is destroyed without a
warning.

1. Connect the USB flash drive to the system.

2. Identify the device path with the diskutil list command. The device path has the format of
/dev/disknumber, where number is the number of the disk. The disks are numbered starting at
zero (0). Typically, Disk 0 is the OS X recovery disk, and Disk 1 is the main OS X installation. In
the following example, the USB device is disk2:

$ diskutil list
/dev/disk0
#: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
0: GUID_partition_scheme *500.3 GB disk0
1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1
2: Apple_CoreStorage 400.0 GB disk0s2
3: Apple_Boot Recovery HD 650.0 MB disk0s3
4: Apple_CoreStorage 98.8 GB disk0s4
5: Apple_Boot Recovery HD 650.0 MB disk0s5
/dev/disk1
#: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
0: Apple_HFS YosemiteHD *399.6 GB disk1
Logical Volume on disk0s1
8A142795-8036-48DF-9FC5-84506DFBB7B2
Unlocked Encrypted
/dev/disk2
#: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
0: FDisk_partition_scheme *8.0 GB disk2
1: Windows_NTFS SanDisk USB 8.0 GB disk2s1

3. To identify your USB flash drive, compare the NAME, TYPE and SIZE columns to your flash
drive. For example, the NAME should be the title of the flash drive icon in the Finder tool. You
can also compare these values to those in the information panel of the flash drive.

4. Use the diskutil unmountDisk command to unmount the flash drive’s filesystem volumes:

$ diskutil unmountDisk /dev/disknumber


Unmount of all volumes on disknumber was successful

21
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

When the command completes, the icon for the flash drive disappears from your desktop. If the
icon does not disappear, you may have selected the wrong disk. Attempting to unmount the
system disk accidentally returns a failed to unmount error.

5. Log in as root:

$ su -

6. Enter your root password when prompted.

7. Use the dd command as a parameter of the sudo command to write the ISO image to the flash
drive:

# sudo dd if=/path/to/image.iso of=/dev/rdisknumber bs=1m>

NOTE

Mac OS X provides both a block (/dev/disk*) and character device (/dev/rdisk*)


file for each storage device. Writing an image to the /dev/rdisknumber character
device is faster than writing to the /dev/disknumber block device.

8. To write the /Users/user_name/Downloads/rhel-8-x86_64-boot.iso file to the /dev/rdisk2


device, run the following command:

# sudo dd if=/Users/user_name/Downloads/rhel-8-x86_64-boot.iso of=/dev/rdisk2

9. Wait for the dd command to finish writing the image to the device. The data transfer is
complete when the # prompt appears. When the prompt is displayed, log out of the root
account and unplug the USB drive. The USB drive is now ready to be used as a boot device.

4.7. PREPARING AN INSTALLATION SOURCE


The Boot ISO image file does not include any repositories or software packages; it contains only the
installation program and the tools required to boot the system and start the installation. This section
contains information about creating an installation source for the Boot ISO image using the Binary DVD
ISO image that contains the required repositories and software packages.

IMPORTANT

Creating an installation source is required only for the Boot ISO image. Red Hat
recommends the Binary DVD ISO image as the preferred method to install Red Hat
Enterprise Linux.

4.7.1. Types of installation source


You can use one of the following installation sources for minimal boot images:

DVD: Burn the Binary DVD ISO image to a DVD. The installation program will automatically
install the software packages from the DVD.

Hard drive or USB drive: Copy the Binary DVD ISO image to the drive and configure the
installation program to install the software packages from the drive. If you use a USB drive,
verify that it is connected to the system before the installation begins. The installation program

22
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

cannot detect media after the installation begins.

Hard drive limitation: The Binary DVD ISO image on the hard drive must be on a partition
with a file system that the installation program can mount. The supported file systems are
xfs, ext2, ext3, ext4, and vfat (FAT32).


WARNING

On Microsoft Windows systems, the default file system used when


formatting hard drives is NTFS. The exFAT file system is also available.
However, neither of these file systems can be mounted during the
installation. If you are creating a hard drive or a USB drive as an installation
source on Microsoft Windows, verify that you formatted the drive as FAT32.
Note that the FAT32 file system cannot store files larger than 4 GiB.

In Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, you can enable installation from a directory
on a local hard drive. To do so, you need to copy the contents of the DVD
ISO image to a directory on a hard drive and then specify the directory as
the installation source instead of the ISO image. For example:
inst.repo=hd:<device>:<path to the directory>

Network location: Copy the Binary DVD ISO image or the installation tree (extracted contents
of the Binary DVD ISO image) to a network location and perform the installation over the
network using the following protocols:

NFS: The Binary DVD ISO image is in a Network File System (NFS) share.

HTTPS, HTTP or FTP: The installation tree is on a network location that is accessible over
HTTP, HTTPS or FTP.

4.7.2. Specify the installation source


You can specify the installation source using any of the following methods:

Graphical installation: Select the installation source in the Installation Source window of the
graphical installation. See Section 6.5.1, “Configuring installation source” for more information.

Boot option: Configure a custom boot option to specify the installation source. See
Appendix D, Boot options reference for more information.

Kickstart file: Use the install command in a Kickstart file to specify the installation source. See
the Performing an advanced RHEL installation document for more information.

4.7.3. Ports for network-based installation


The following table lists the ports that must be open on the server providing the files for each type of
network-based installation.

Table 4.2. Ports for network-based installation

23
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

Protocol used Ports to open

HTTP 80

HTTPS 443

FTP 21

NFS 2049, 111, 20048

TFTP 69

Additional resources

See the Securing networks document for more information.

4.7.4. Creating an installation source on an NFS server


Follow the steps in this procedure to place the installation source on an NFS server. Use this installation
method to install multiple systems from a single source, without having to connect to physical media.

Prerequisites

You have administor level access to a server with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, and this server is
on the same network as the system to be installed.

You have downloaded a Binary DVD ISO image. See Section 4.5, “Downloading the installation
ISO image” for more information.

You have created a bootable CD, DVD, or USB device from the image file. See Section 4.6,
“Creating installation media” for more information.

You have verified that your firewall allows the system you are installing to access the remote
installation source. See Section 4.7.3, “Ports for network-based installation” for more
information.

Procedure

1. Install the nfs-utils package:

# yum install nfs-utils

2. Copy the Binary DVD ISO image to a directory on the NFS server.

3. Open the /etc/exports file using a text editor and add a line with the following syntax:

/exported_directory/ clients

4. Replace /exported_directory/ with the full path to the directory with the ISO image. Replace
clients with the host name or IP address of the target system, the subnetwork that all target
systems can use to access the ISO image, or the asterisk sign (*) if you want to allow any system

24
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

with network access to the NFS server to use the ISO image. See the exports(5) man page for
detailed information about the format of this field.
A basic configuration that makes the /rhel8-install/ directory available as read-only to all clients
is:

/rhel8-install *

5. Save the /etc/exports file and exit the text editor.

6. Start the nfs service:

# systemctl start nfs-server.service

If the service was running before you changed the /etc/exports file, run the following command
for the running NFS server to reload its configuration:

# systemctl reload nfs-server.service

The ISO image is now accessible over NFS and ready to be used as an installation source.

NOTE

When configuring the installation source, use nfs: as the protocol, the server host name
or IP address, the colon sign (:), and the directory holding the ISO image. For example, if
the server host name is myserver.example.com and you have saved the ISO image in
/rhel8-install/, specify nfs:myserver.example.com:/rhel8-install/ as the installation
source.

4.7.5. Creating an installation source using HTTP or HTTPS


Follow the steps in this procedure to create an installation source for a network-based installation using
an installation tree, which is a directory containing extracted contents of the Binary DVD ISO image and
a valid .treeinfo file. The installation source is accessed over HTTP or HTTPS.

Prerequisites

You have administor level access to a server with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, and this server is
on the same network as the system to be installed.

You have downloaded a Binary DVD ISO image. See Section 4.5, “Downloading the installation
ISO image” for more information.

You have created a bootable CD, DVD, or USB device from the image file. See Section 4.6,
“Creating installation media” for more information.

You have verified that your firewall allows the system you are installing to access the remote
installation source. See Section 4.7.3, “Ports for network-based installation” for more
information.

Procedure

1. Install the httpd package:

# yum install httpd

25
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation


WARNING

If your Apache web server configuration enables SSL security, verify that
you enable only the TLSv1 protocol, and disable SSLv2 and SSLv3. This is
due to the POODLE SSL vulnerability (CVE-2014-3566). See
https://access.redhat.com/solutions/1232413 for details.

IMPORTANT

If you use an HTTPS server with a self-signed certificate, you must boot the
installation program with the noverifyssl option.

2. Copy the Binary DVD ISO image to the HTTP(S) server.

3. Mount the Binary DVD ISO image, using the mount command, to a suitable directory:

# mkdir /mnt/rhel8-install/
# mount -o loop,ro -t iso9660 /image_directory/image.iso /mnt/rhel8-install/

Replace /image_directory/image.iso with the path to the Binary DVD ISO image.

4. Copy the files from the mounted image to the HTTP(S) server root. This command creates the
/var/www/html/rhel8-install/ directory with the contents of the image.

# cp -r /mnt/rhel8-install/ /var/www/html/

This command creates the /var/www/html/rhel8-install/ directory with the content of the
image. Note that some copying methods can skip the .treeinfo file which is required for a valid
installation source. Running the cp command for whole directories as shown in this procedure
will copy .treeinfo correctly.

5. Start the httpd service:

# systemctl start httpd.service

The installation tree is now accessible and ready to be used as the installation source.

NOTE

When configuring the installation source, use http:// or https:// as the protocol,
the server host name or IP address, and the directory that contains the files from
the ISO image, relative to the HTTP server root. For example, if you are using
HTTP, the server host name is myserver.example.com, and you have copied the
files from the image to /var/www/html/rhel8-install/, specify
http://myserver.example.com/rhel8-install/ as the installation source.

Additional resources

For more information about HTTP servers, see the Deploying different types of servers
document.

26
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

4.7.6. Creating an installation source using FTP


Follow the steps in this procedure to create an installation source for a network-based installation using
an installation tree, which is a directory containing extracted contents of the Binary DVD ISO image and
a valid .treeinfo file. The installation source is accessed over FTP.

Prerequisites

You have administor level access to a server with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, and this server is
on the same network as the system to be installed.

You have downloaded a Binary DVD ISO image. See Section 4.5, “Downloading the installation
ISO image” for more information.

You have created a bootable CD, DVD, or USB device from the image file. See Section 4.6,
“Creating installation media” for more information.

You have verified that your firewall allows the system you are installing to access the remote
installation source. See Section 4.7.3, “Ports for network-based installation” for more
information.

Procedure

1. Install the vsftpd package by running the following command as root:

# yum install vsftpd

2. Open and edit the /etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf configuration file in a text editor.

a. Change the line anonymous_enable=NO to anonymous_enable=YES

b. Change the line write_enable=YES to write_enable=NO.

c. Add lines pasv_min_port=min_port and pasv_max_port=max_port. Replace min_port


and max_port with the port number range used by FTP server in passive mode, e. g. 10021
and 10031.
This step can be necessary in network environments featuring various firewall/NAT setups.

d. Optionally, add custom changes to your configuration. For available options, see the
vsftpd.conf(5) man page. This procedure assumes that default options are used.


WARNING

If you configured SSL/TLS security in your vsftpd.conf file, ensure that


you enable only the TLSv1 protocol, and disable SSLv2 and SSLv3. This
is due to the POODLE SSL vulnerability (CVE-2014-3566). See
https://access.redhat.com/solutions/1234773 for details.

3. Configure the server firewall.

a. Enable the firewall:

27
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

# systemctl enable firewalld


# systemctl start firewalld

b. Enable in your firewall the FTP port and port range from previous step:

# firewall-cmd --add-port min_port-max_port/tcp --permanent


# firewall-cmd --add-service ftp --permanent
# firewall-cmd --reload

Replace min_port-max_port with the port numbers you entered into the
/etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf configuration file.

4. Copy the Binary DVD ISO image to the FTP server.

5. Mount the Binary DVD ISO image, using the mount command, to a suitable directory:

# mkdir /mnt/rhel8-install
# mount -o loop,ro -t iso9660 /image-directory/image.iso /mnt/rhel8-install

Replace /image-directory/image.iso with the path to the Binary DVD ISO image.

6. Copy the files from the mounted image to the FTP server root:

# mkdir /var/ftp/rhel8-install
# cp -r /mnt/rhel8-install/ /var/ftp/

This command creates the /var/ftp/rhel8-install/ directory with the content of the image. Note
that some copying methods can skip the .treeinfo file which is required for a valid installation
source. Running the cp command for whole directories as shown in this procedure will copy
.treeinfo correctly.

7. Make sure that the correct SELinux context and access mode is set on the copied content:

# restorecon -r /var/ftp/rhel8-install
# find /var/ftp/rhel8-install -type f -exec chmod 444 {} \;
# find /var/ftp/rhel8-install -type d -exec chmod 755 {} \;

8. Start the vsftpd service:

# systemctl start vsftpd.service

If the service was running before you changed the /etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf file, restart the
service to load the edited file:

# systemctl restart vsftpd.service

The installation tree is now accessible and ready to be used as the installation source.

NOTE
28
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

NOTE

When configuring the installation source, use ftp:// as the protocol, the server
host name or IP address, and the directory in which you have stored the files from
the ISO image, relative to the FTP server root. For example, if the server host
name is myserver.example.com and you have copied the files from the image
to /var/ftp/rhel8-install/, specify ftp://myserver.example.com/rhel8-install/ as
the installation source.

29
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

CHAPTER 5. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION


Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the Binary DVD ISO is the easiest and the recommended
method of performing a standard RHEL installation. Other installation methods require additional setup
and configuration. For example, when installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on a large number of systems
simultaneously, the best approach is to boot from a PXE server and install from a source in a shared
network location.

After you have created a bootable USB, DVD, or CD you are ready to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux
installation.

5.1. TYPES OF BOOT OPTIONS


There are two types of boot options; those with an equals "=" sign, and those without an equals "=" sign.
Boot options are appended to the boot command line and multiple options must be separated by a
single space. Boot options that are specific to the installation program always start with inst.

Options with an equals "=" sign


You must specify a value for boot options that use the = symbol. For example, the
inst.vncpassword= option must contain a value, in this case, a password. The correct syntax for this
example is inst.vncpassword=password.
Options without an equals "=" sign
This boot option does not accept any values or parameters. For example, the rd.live.check option
forces the installation program to verify the installation media before starting the installation. If this
boot option is present, the verification is performed; if the boot option is not present, the verification
is skipped.

5.2. EDITING BOOT OPTIONS


This section contains information about the different ways that you can edit boot options from the boot
menu. The boot menu opens after you boot the installation media.

Editing the boot: prompt in BIOS


When using the boot: prompt, the first option must always specify the installation program image file
that you want to load. In most cases, you can specify the image using the keyword. You can specify
additional options according to your requirements.

Prerequisites

You have created bootable installation media (USB, CD or DVD).

You have booted the installation from the media, and the installation boot menu is open.

Procedure

1. With the boot menu open, press the Esc key on your keyboard.

2. The boot: prompt is now accessible.

3. Press the Tab key on your keyboard to display the help commands.

4. Press the Enter key on your keyboard to start the installation with your options. To return from
the boot: prompt to the boot menu, restart the system and boot from the installation media
again.

30
CHAPTER 5. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION

NOTE

The boot: prompt also accepts dracut kernel options. A list of options is available in the
dracut.cmdline(7) man page.

Editing the > prompt


You can use the > prompt to edit predefined boot options. For example, select Test this media and
install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0.0 from the boot menu to display a full set of options.

NOTE

This procedure is for BIOS-based AMD64 and Intel 64 systems.

Prerequisites

You have created bootable installation media (USB, CD or DVD).

You have booted the installation from the media, and the installation boot menu is open.

Procedure

1. From the boot menu, select an option and press the Tab key on your keyboard. The > prompt is
accessible and displays the available options.

2. Append the options that you require to the > prompt.

3. Press the Enter key on your keyboard to start the installation.

4. Press the Esc key on your keyboard to cancel editing and return to the boot menu.

Editing the GRUB2 menu


The GRUB2 menu is available on UEFI-based AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM systems.

Prerequisites

You have created bootable installation media (USB, CD or DVD).

You have booted the installation from the media, and the installation boot menu is open.

Procedure

1. From the boot menu window, select an option and press the e key on your keyboard.

2. When you finish editing, press F10 or Ctrl+X on your keyboard to start the installation using the
specified options.

5.3. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION FROM A USB, CD, OR DVD


Follow the steps in this procedure to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation using a USB, CD, or
DVD. The following steps are generic. Consult your hardware manufacturer’s documentation for specific
instructions.

Prerequisite

You have created bootable installation media (USB, CD or DVD). See Section 4.6, “Creating installation

31
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

You have created bootable installation media (USB, CD or DVD). See Section 4.6, “Creating installation
media” for more information.

Procedure

1. Power off the system to which you are installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

2. Disconnect any drives from the system.

3. Power on the system.

4. Insert the bootable installation media (USB, DVD, or CD).

5. Power off the system but do not remove the boot media.

6. Power on the system.

NOTE

You might need to press a specific key or combination of keys to boot from the
media or configure the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) of your system to
boot from the media. For more information, see the documentation that came
with your system.

7. The Red Hat Enterprise Linux boot window opens and displays information about a variety of
available boot options.

8. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to select the boot option that you require, and press Enter
to select the boot option. The Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linuxwindow opens and you
can install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface.

NOTE

The installation program automatically begins if no action is performed in the


boot window within 60 seconds.

9. Optional: For UEFI-based systems, press E to edit the available boot options. For BIOS-based
systems, press the Tab key on your keyboard to edit the available boot options. The boot
window enters edit mode and you can change the predefined command line to add or remove
boot options.

a. Press Enter to confirm your choice.

Additional Resources

For more information about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the Graphical User
Interface, see Chapter 6, Installing RHEL using the Graphical User Interface .

For more information about the list of available boot options you can use on the boot command
line, see Appendix D, Boot options reference .

5.4. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION FROM A NETWORK USING PXE

Follow the steps in this procedure to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation from a network using
32
CHAPTER 5. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION

Follow the steps in this procedure to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation from a network using
PXE.

Prerequisites

You have configured a TFTP server, and there is a network interface in your system that
supports PXE. See Additional resources for more information.

You have configured your system to boot from the network interface. This option is in the BIOS,
and can be labeled Network Boot or Boot Services.

You have verified that the BIOS is configured to boot from the specified network interface.
Some BIOS systems specify the network interface as a possible boot device, but do not support
the PXE standard. See your hardware’s documentation for more information. When you have
properly enabled PXE booting, the system can boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation
program without any other media.

Procedure

NOTE

To boot the installation process from a network using PXE, you must use a physical
network connection, for example, Ethernet. You cannot boot the installation process with
a wireless connection.

1. Verify that the network cable is attached. The link indicator light on the network socket should
be lit, even if the computer is not switched on.

2. Switch on the system.


Depending on your hardware, some network setup and diagnostic information can be displayed
before your system connects to a PXE server. When connected, a menu is displayed according
to the PXE server configuration.

3. Press the number key that corresponds to the option that you require.

NOTE

In some instances, boot options are not displayed. If this occurs, press the Enter
key on your keyboard or wait until the boot window opens.

The Red Hat Enterprise Linux boot window opens and displays information about a variety of
available boot options.

4. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to select the boot option that you require, and press Enter
to select the boot option. The Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linuxwindow opens and you
can install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface.

NOTE

The installation program automatically begins if no action is performed in the


boot window within 60 seconds.

5. Optional: For UEFI-based systems, press E to edit the available boot options. For BIOS-based
systems, press the Tab key on your keyboard to edit the available boot options. The boot

33
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

window enters edit mode and you can change the predefined command line to add or remove
boot options.

a. Press Enter to confirm your choice.

Additional Resources

For information about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the Graphical User Interface,
see Chapter 6, Installing RHEL using the Graphical User Interface .

For information about how to prepare to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the network using
PXE, see the Performing an advanced RHEL installation document.

For more information about the list of available boot options you can use on the boot command
line, see Appendix D, Boot options reference .

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CHAPTER 6. INSTALLING RHEL USING THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE

CHAPTER 6. INSTALLING RHEL USING THE GRAPHICAL USER


INTERFACE
This section contains information about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the Graphical User
Interface (GUI). The GUI is the preferred method of installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux when you boot
the system from a CD, DVD, or USB flash drive, or from a network using PXE.

NOTE

There may be some variance between the online help and the content that is published
on the Customer Portal. For the latest updates, see the installation content on the
Customer Portal.

6.1. GRAPHICAL INSTALLATION WORKFLOW


Complete the following steps to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface:

Steps

1. Configure language and location settings. See Section 6.2, “Configuring language and location
settings” for more information.

2. Configure localization settings. See Section 6.4, “Configuring localization options” for more
information.

3. Select the installation source and software packages that you require. See Section 6.5,
“Configuring software options” for more information.

4. Configure installation destination, KDUMP, network, security policy, and system purpose. See
Section 6.6, “Configuring system options” for more information.

5. Configure storage. See Section 6.7, “Configuring storage devices” for more information.

6. Start the installation and create a user account and password. See Section 6.9, “Starting the
installation program” for more information.

7. Complete the graphical installation. See Section 6.9.4, “Graphical installation complete” for
more information.

NOTE

When installing from a network location, you must configure the network before you can
select the software packages that you want to install.

6.2. CONFIGURING LANGUAGE AND LOCATION SETTINGS


The installation program uses the language that you select during installation, and on the installed
system.

Prerequisites

1. You created installation media. See Section 4.6, “Creating installation media” for more
information.

35
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

2. You specified an installation source if you are using the Boot ISO image file. See Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

3. You booted the installation. See Chapter 5, Booting the installation for more information.

Procedure

1. From the left-hand pane of the Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linuxwindow, select a
language. Alternatively, type your preferred language into the Search field.

NOTE

A language is pre-selected by default. If network access is configured, that is, if


you booted from a network server instead of local media, the pre-selected
language is determined by the automatic location detection feature of the
GeoIP module. If you used the inst.lang= option on the boot command line or in
your PXE server configuration, then the language that you define with the boot
option is selected.

2. From the right-hand pane of the Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linuxwindow, select a
location specific to your region.

3. Click Continue to proceed to the Section 6.3, “The Installation Summary window” window.

IMPORTANT

If you are installing a pre-release version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, a warning
message is displayed about the pre-release status of the installation media. Click
I want to proceed to continue with the installation, or I want to exit to quit the
installation and reboot the system.

Additional resources
For information about how to change language and location settings during the installation program,
see Section 6.4, “Configuring localization options”

6.3. THE INSTALLATION SUMMARY WINDOW


The Installation Summary window is the central location for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 installation
program.

Figure 6.1. Installation summary


36
CHAPTER 6. INSTALLING RHEL USING THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE

Figure 6.1. Installation summary

The Installation Summary window contains three categories:

LOCALIZATION: You can configure Keyboard, Language Support, and Time and Date.

SOFTWARE: You can configure Installation Source and Software Selection.

SYSTEM: You can configure Installation Destination, KDUMP, Network and Host Name, Security
Policy, and System Purpose.

A category can have a different status depending on where it is in the installation program.

Table 6.1. Category status

Category status Status Description

Warning symbol type 1 Yellow triangle with an Requires attention before


exclamation mark and red text installation. For example,
Installation Destination requires
attention as you must confirm the
default automatic partitioning
variant.

37
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

Category status Status Description

Warning symbol type 2 Grayed out and with a warning The installation program is
symbol (yellow triangle with an configuring a category and you
exclamation mark) must wait for it to finish before
accessing the window.

NOTE

A warning message is displayed at the bottom of the Installation Summary window and
the Begin Installation button is disabled until you configure all of the required
categories.

Additional resources

For information about how to configure Localization settings, see Section 6.4, “Configuring
localization options”

For information about how to configure Software settings, see Section 6.5, “Configuring
software options”

For information about how to configure System settings, see Section 6.6, “Configuring system
options”

6.4. CONFIGURING LOCALIZATION OPTIONS


This section contains information about configuring your keyboard, language support, and time and date
settings.

IMPORTANT

If you use a layout that cannot accept Latin characters, such as Russian, add the English
(United States) layout and configure a keyboard combination to switch between the two
layouts. If you select only a layout that does not have Latin characters, you might be
unable to enter a valid root password and user credentials later in the installation process.
This can prevent you from completing the installation.

6.4.1. Configuring keyboard, language, and time and date settings

NOTE

Keyboard, Language, and Time and Date Settings are configured by default as part of
Section 6.2, “Configuring language and location settings” . To change any of the settings,
complete the following steps, otherwise proceed to Section 6.5, “Configuring software
options”.

Procedure: Configuring keyboard settings

1. From the Installation Summary window, click Keyboard. The default layout depends on the
option selected in Section 6.2, “Configuring language and location settings” .

a. Click + to open the Add a Keyboard Layout window and change to a different layout.

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CHAPTER 6. INSTALLING RHEL USING THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE

b. Select a layout by browsing the list or use the Search field.

c. Select the required layout and click Add. The new layout appears under the default layout.

d. Click Options to optionally configure a keyboard switch that you can use to cycle between
available layouts. The Layout Switching Options window opens.

e. To configure key combinations for switching, select one or more key combinations and click
OK to confirm your selection.

NOTE

When you select a layout, click the Keyboard button to open a new dialog
box that displays a visual representation of the selected layout.

f. Click Done to apply the settings and return to Section 6.3, “The Installation Summary
window”.

Procedure: Configuring language settings

1. From the Installation Summary window, click Language Support. The Language Support
window opens. The left pane lists the available language groups. If at least one language from a
group is configured, a check mark is displayed and the supported language is highlighted.

a. From the left pane, click a group to select additional languages, and from the right pane,
select regional options. Repeat this process for languages that you require.

b. Click Done to apply the changes and return to Section 6.3, “The Installation Summary
window”.

Procedure: Configuring time and date settings

1. From the Installation Summary window, click Time & Date. The Time & Date window opens.

NOTE

The Time & Date settings are configured by default based on the settings you
selected in Section 6.2, “Configuring language and location settings” .

The list of cities and regions come from the Time Zone Database (tzdata) public
domain that is maintained by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).
Red Hat can not add cities or regions to this database. You can find more
information at the IANA official website.

a. From the Region drop-down menu, select a region.

NOTE

Select Etc as your region to configure a time zone relative to Greenwich


Источник: https://www.scribd.com/document/432490855/Red-Hat-Enterprise-Linux-8-Performing-a-Standard-RHEL-Installation-En-US

This commit represents a new era for Gentoo: Storing the gentoo-x86 tree in Git, as converted from CVS. This commit is the start of the NEW history. Any historical data is intended to be grafted onto this point. Creation process: 1. Take final CVS checkout snapshot 2. Remove ALL ChangeLog* files 3. Transform all Manifests to thin 4. Remove empty Manifests 5. Convert all stale $Header$/$Id$ CVS keywords to non-expanded Git $Id$ 5.1. Do not touch files with -kb/-ko keyword flags. Signed-off-by: Robin H. Johnson <robbat2@gentoo.org> X-Thanks: Alec Warner <antarus@gentoo.org> - did the GSoC 2006 migration tests X-Thanks: Robin H. Johnson <robbat2@gentoo.org> - infra guy, herding this project X-Thanks: Nguyen Thai Ngoc Duy <pclouds@gentoo.org> - Former Gentoo developer, wrote Git features for the migration X-Thanks: Brian Harring <ferringb@gentoo.org> - wrote much python to improve cvs2svn X-Thanks: Rich Freeman <rich0@gentoo.org> - validation scripts X-Thanks: Patrick Lauer <patrick@gentoo.org> - Gentoo dev, running new 2014 work in migration X-Thanks: Michał Górny <mgorny@gentoo.org> - scripts, QA, nagging X-Thanks: All of other Gentoo developers - many ideas and lots of paint on the bikeshed

Источник: https://gitweb.gentoo.org/repo/gentoo.git/commit/licenses?id=56bd759df1d0c750a065b8c845e93d5dfa6b549d

Using FedUp to Update an EFI Boot Stub System to Fedora 19

FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) is the new tool for upgrading existing Fedora installs in Fedora 18 and above releases. It replaces all the previously recommended upgrade methods, i.e. PreUpgrade, DVD, USB, etc., that were available in previous Fedora releases. By the way, the Anaconda installer was totally redesigned for Fedora 18 and no longer has built-in upgrade functionality in Fedora 18 or later releases. Such functionality was delegated to FedUp.

In this post, I demonstrate how to use FedUp to upgrade an EFI Boot Stub (EFISTUB) Fedora 18 system to an EFI Boot Stub Fedora 19 system. The EFI Boot Stub boot mechanism was first implemented in Linux kernel version 3.3.0 and provides for a significantly faster boot mechanism because a traditional EFI-aware bootloader, for example the Red Hat modified GRUB, GRUB2 and Gummiboot, is no longer required on a UEFI-enabled system.

FedUp is capable of upgrading Fedora 17 installs to Fedora 18 (Spherical Cow) or Fedora 19 (Schrödinger’s Cat), or Fedora 18 to Fedora 19 using a networked repository, similar to how PreUpgrade worked. This is the mechanism that I used. Other upgrade methods including an ISO file or DVD are supported but will not be discussed further in this post. You can find detailed information on all these methods in the FedUp Wiki.

Here is the EFI shell script which I used to boot Fedora 18 from the EFI shell prompt:

# cat /boot/efi/f18.nsh vmlinuz-3.9.5-201.fc18.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet initrd=.\initramfs-3.9.5-201.fc18.x86_64.img


I assume that you are fairly familiar with the EFI shell and EFI shell scripts if you are reading this post so I make no attempt to explain how to create such a script.

FedUp consists of two components – a client which prepares the system for the upgrade and a pre-boot environment which does the actual system upgrade using systemd and YUM. The FedUp client gathers the packages needed for upgrade in addition to downloading the required initramfs and kernel needed for the actual upgrade. Files are downloaded to /var/lib/fedora-upgrade, and are deleted after the upgrade process completes. The actual upgrade occurs when the system has been rebooted after preparing the system for the upgrade. Filesystems are mounted during boot, the already downloaded packages are installed and some upgrade-related tasks are performed. During the upgrade process, a special Plymouth theme is used which has a progress bar to indicate current upgrade progress. The final phase is the cleanup and removal of unnecessary files and packages.

To upgrade a system, you must first install a FedUp package. The version installed on my system was fedup-0.7.3-4.fc19.noarch.

$ rpm -ql fedup /etc/fedup /etc/fedup/update.img.d /etc/fedup/update.img.d/bug896023.img /usr/bin/fedup /usr/bin/fedup-cli /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup-0.7.3-py2.7.egg-info /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/__init__.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/__init__.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/__init__.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/boot.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/boot.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/boot.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/callback.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/callback.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/callback.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/commandline.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/commandline.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/commandline.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/conf.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/conf.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/conf.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/download.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/download.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/download.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/logutils.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/logutils.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/logutils.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/media.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/media.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/media.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/sysprep.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/sysprep.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/sysprep.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/textoutput.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/textoutput.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/textoutput.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/treeinfo.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/treeinfo.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/treeinfo.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/upgrade.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/upgrade.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/upgrade.pyo /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/util.py /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/util.pyc /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/fedup/util.pyo /usr/lib/systemd/system/system-upgrade.target /usr/lib/systemd/system/upgrade-prep.service /usr/lib/systemd/system/upgrade-switch-root.service /usr/lib/systemd/system/upgrade-switch-root.target /usr/lib/systemd/upgrade-prep.sh /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3 /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3/COPYING /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3/README.asciidoc /usr/share/doc/fedup-0.7.3/TODO.asciidoc /usr/share/man/man8/fedup-cli.8.gz /usr/share/man/man8/fedup.8.gz


The contents of this RPM were not removed after the upgrade was completed.

Once you have installed the Fedup package, you can start the system upgrade using the following command:


You should check the /var/log/fedup.log file for any errors that occur in the preparation phase.

During the preparation stage of the upgrade the FedUp client installed the following three Fedup-related packages (and also numerous other packages). The Dracut-related files were installed on my system via the fedup-dracut.x86_64 0:0.7.3-1.fc19 package.

$ rpm -ql fedup-dracut /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/do-upgrade.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/keep-initramfs.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/module-setup.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/save-journal.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/85system-upgrade-fedora/upgrade-cleanup.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/README.txt /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/module-setup.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-debug-shell.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-init.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-post.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-post.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-pre-pivot.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-pre.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade-pre.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade.service /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade.sh /usr/lib/dracut/modules.d/90system-upgrade/upgrade.target /usr/libexec/system-upgrade-fedora /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3 /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/COPYING /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/README.asciidoc /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/TODO.asciidoc /usr/share/doc/fedup-dracut-0.7.3/makefeduprepo


The contents of this RPM were removed after the upgrade completed.

The special FedUp Plymouth theme was installed via the fedup-dracut-plymouth.noarch 0:0.7.3-1.fc19 package.

$ rpm -ql fedup-dracut-plymouth /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-000.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-001.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-002.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-003.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-004.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-005.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/animation-006.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/box.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/bullet.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/entry.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/fedup.plymouth /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/lock.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-000.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-001.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-002.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-003.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-004.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-005.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-006.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-007.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-008.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-009.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-010.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-011.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-012.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-013.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-014.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-015.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-016.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-017.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-018.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-019.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-020.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-021.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-022.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-023.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-024.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-025.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-026.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-027.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-028.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-029.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-030.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-031.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-032.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-033.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-034.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-035.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-036.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-037.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-038.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-039.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-040.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-041.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-042.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-043.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-044.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-045.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-046.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-047.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-048.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-049.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-050.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-051.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-052.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-053.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-054.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-055.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-056.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-057.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-058.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-059.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-060.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-061.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-062.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-063.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-064.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-065.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-066.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-067.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-068.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-069.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-070.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-071.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-072.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-073.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-074.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-075.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-076.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-077.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-078.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-079.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-080.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-081.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-082.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-083.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-084.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-085.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-086.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-087.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-088.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-089.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-090.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-091.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-092.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-093.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-094.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-095.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-096.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-097.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-098.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-099.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-100.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-101.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-102.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-103.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-104.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-105.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-106.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-107.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-108.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-109.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-110.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-111.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-112.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-113.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-114.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-115.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-116.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-117.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-118.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-119.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-120.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-121.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-122.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-123.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/progress-124.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-000.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-001.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-002.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-003.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-004.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-005.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-006.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-007.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-008.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-009.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-010.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-011.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-012.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-013.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-014.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-015.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-016.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-017.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-018.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-019.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-020.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-021.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-022.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-023.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-024.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-025.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-026.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-027.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-028.png /usr/share/plymouth/themes/fedup/throbber-029.png


The contents of this RPM were removed after the upgrade completed. You can see a demo of the Plymouth FedUp theme in action on my YouTube channel.

Once the first stage of the FedUp process has completed without major error, the second stage is invoked by rebooting your system. However do not reboot your system yet! Instead, as root, examine your /boot/efi/EFI/redhat/grub.conf file. It should contain a new menu stanza entitled “System Upgrade”. Take the contents of that stanza and create a new EFI shell script called /boot/efi/upgrade.nsh containing the appropriate EFISTUB command to invoke the special FedUp initramfs and kernel.

Here is what mine looked like:

# cat /boot/efi/fedup.nsh vmlinuz-fedup.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet upgrade systemd.unit=system-upgrade.target plymouth.splash=fedup selinux=0 initrd=.\initramfs-fedup.img


Note you will have to copy and rename both the vmlinux-fedup-* and the initramfs-fedup-* images from /boot to /boot/efi/.

After this is done, shutdown your system and boot it from your EFI shell using fedup.nsh. The system should boot into the upgrade process and a Plymouth FedUp boot screen should be displayed. If you press the ESC key, a more detailed information about the progress of the update will be displayed. If you switch back to the graphical progress indicator, it will remain at 0% for the remainder of the upgrade but that does not mean the upgrade has stopped. This is a “feature” of the current version of FedUp. Another way to view the progress of the upgrade is to enable the upgrade debugshell by appending rd.upgrade.debugshell to the kernel command line and and invoke journalctl -a -o cat.

Once the upgrade is completed, the system will automatically reboot. This is where you need to interrupt the reboot sequence at the GRUB prompt and modify the GRUB staza using the familiar kernel command line init=/bin/bash trick so that Fedora 19 boots into single user mode. You then need to create an EFI shell script (I called mine f19.nsh) andi then, as before, copy/rename the appropriate kernel and initramfs images from /boot to /boot/efi.

Here is the contents of my f19.nsh shell script:

# cat /boot/efi/f19.nsh vmlinuz-3.9.6-301.fc19.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet initrd=.\initramfs-3.9.6-301.fc19.x86_64.img

The upgrade journal is saved to /var/log/upgrade.journal, and also written to /var/log/upgrade.log for those who do not like the systemd journal approach.

# cd /var/log
# ls -alR upgrade.journal/
upgrade.journal/:
total 16
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 .
drwxr-xr-x. 21 root root 4096 Jun 23 06:30 ..
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 23 09:37 5dff8a4a65fc4da695a61adeb9fd402b
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 9b740bef3a774a0e9251ae6b0f0c8311

upgrade.journal/5dff8a4a65fc4da695a61adeb9fd402b:
total 2716
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 23 09:37 .
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 ..
-rw-r—– 1 root systemd-journal 2772992 Jun 22 22:51 system.journal

upgrade.journal/9b740bef3a774a0e9251ae6b0f0c8311:
total 6188
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 .
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 22 22:51 ..
-rw-r—– 1 root systemd-journal 6328320 Jun 22 23:47 system.journal

# cd 5dff8a4a65fc4da695a61adeb9fd402b
# journalctl -a -no-pager
G– Logs begin at Sun 2013-06-23 02:51:33 UTC, end at Sun 2013-06-23 03:47:41 UTC. —
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost systemd-journal[94]: Allowing runtime journal files to grow to 721.5M.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpu
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Linux version 3.9.2-301.fc19.x86_64 (mockbuild@bkernel01.phx2.fedoraproject.org) (gcc version 4.8.0 20130412 (Red Hat 4.8.0-2) (GCC) ) #1 SMP Mon May 13 12:36:24 UTC 2013
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Command line: vmlinuz-fedup.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet upgrade systemd.unit=system-upgrade.target plymouth.splash=fedup selinux=0 initrd=.\initramfs-fedup.img
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: BIOS-provided physical RAM map:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000009efff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000000009f000-0x000000000009ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x000000001fffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000020000000-0x00000000201fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000020200000-0x0000000040003fff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000040004000-0x0000000040004fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000040005000-0x0000000099f5bfff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000099f5c000-0x000000009a54dfff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a54e000-0x000000009a7cdfff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a7ce000-0x000000009a7d2fff] ACPI data
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a7d3000-0x000000009a815fff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009a816000-0x000000009ae1ffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009ae20000-0x000000009aff1fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009aff2000-0x000000009affffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x000000009b800000-0x000000009f9fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fbffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fed00000-0x00000000fed03fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fed1c000-0x00000000fed1ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000ff000000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x00000003feffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cd73f98-0x0cd73fbf] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cd75018-0x0cd85057] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cd86018-0x0cd92857] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cec5018-0x0cedc657] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x0cedd018-0x0cee9057] usable ==> usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: extended physical RAM map:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x000000000009efff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000009f000-0x000000000009ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000000100000-0x000000000cd73f97] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd73f98-0x000000000cd73fbf] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd73fc0-0x000000000cd75017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd75018-0x000000000cd85057] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd85058-0x000000000cd86017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd86018-0x000000000cd92857] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cd92858-0x000000000cec5017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cec5018-0x000000000cedc657] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cedc658-0x000000000cedd017] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cedd018-0x000000000cee9057] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000000cee9058-0x000000001fffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000020000000-0x00000000201fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000020200000-0x0000000040003fff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000040004000-0x0000000040004fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000040005000-0x0000000099f5bfff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000099f5c000-0x000000009a54dfff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a54e000-0x000000009a7cdfff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a7ce000-0x000000009a7d2fff] ACPI data
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a7d3000-0x000000009a815fff] ACPI NVS
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009a816000-0x000000009ae1ffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009ae20000-0x000000009aff1fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009aff2000-0x000000009affffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x000000009b800000-0x000000009f9fffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fbffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fed00000-0x00000000fed03fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fed1c000-0x00000000fed1ffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee00fff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x00000000ff000000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reserve setup_data: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x00000003feffffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NX (Execute Disable) protection: active
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: EFI v2.31 by American Megatrends
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: ACPI=0x9a7b1000 ACPI 2.0=0x9a7b1000 SMBIOS=0xf0480 MPS=0xfc8e0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem00: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000000000-0x0000000000008000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem01: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000008000-0x0000000000011000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem02: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000011000-0x0000000000058000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem03: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000058000-0x0000000000059000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem04: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000059000-0x000000000005f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem05: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000005f000-0x0000000000060000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem06: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000060000-0x000000000009f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem07: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000000009f000-0x00000000000a0000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem08: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000000100000-0x0000000001000000) (15MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem09: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001000000-0x0000000001100000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem10: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001100000-0x0000000001a6f000) (9MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem11: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001a6f000-0x0000000001a7e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem12: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001a7e000-0x0000000001b7f000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem13: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b7f000-0x0000000001b82000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem14: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b82000-0x0000000001b86000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem15: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b86000-0x0000000001b87000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem16: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b87000-0x0000000001b92000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem17: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b92000-0x0000000001b93000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem18: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b93000-0x0000000001b96000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem19: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b96000-0x0000000001b97000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem20: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001b97000-0x0000000001fe6000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem21: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fe6000-0x0000000001fe7000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem22: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fe7000-0x0000000001fec000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem23: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fec000-0x0000000001ff0000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem24: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ff0000-0x0000000001ff4000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem25: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ff4000-0x0000000001ff5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem26: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ff5000-0x0000000001ffa000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem27: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ffa000-0x0000000001ffb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem28: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001ffb000-0x0000000001fff000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem29: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000001fff000-0x0000000002000000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem30: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002000000-0x0000000002001000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem31: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002001000-0x0000000002002000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem32: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002002000-0x0000000002003000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem33: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002003000-0x0000000002004000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem34: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002004000-0x0000000002006000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem35: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002006000-0x0000000002007000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem36: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002007000-0x000000000200c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem37: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000200c000-0x000000000200d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem38: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000200d000-0x000000000200f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem39: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000200f000-0x0000000002014000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem40: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002014000-0x000000000202a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem41: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000202a000-0x000000000202c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem42: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000202c000-0x0000000002030000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem43: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002030000-0x0000000002033000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem44: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002033000-0x000000000205a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem45: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000205a000-0x0000000002064000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem46: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002064000-0x000000000207e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem47: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000207e000-0x0000000002081000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem48: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002081000-0x0000000002086000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem49: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002086000-0x0000000002087000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem50: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002087000-0x0000000002088000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem51: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002088000-0x0000000002089000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem52: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002089000-0x000000000208c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem53: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000208c000-0x0000000002092000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem54: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002092000-0x0000000002099000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem55: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002099000-0x000000000209a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem56: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000209a000-0x000000000209c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem57: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000209c000-0x00000000020a0000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem58: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020a0000-0x00000000020a5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem59: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020a5000-0x00000000020a9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem60: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020a9000-0x00000000020af000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem61: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020af000-0x00000000020b1000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem62: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020b1000-0x00000000020b9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem63: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020b9000-0x00000000020bd000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem64: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020bd000-0x00000000020be000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem65: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020be000-0x00000000020bf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem66: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020bf000-0x00000000020c1000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem67: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c1000-0x00000000020c4000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem68: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c4000-0x00000000020c7000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem69: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c7000-0x00000000020c8000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem70: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020c8000-0x00000000020cb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem71: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020cb000-0x00000000020ce000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem72: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020ce000-0x00000000020db000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem73: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020db000-0x00000000020dc000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem74: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020dc000-0x00000000020e9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem75: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020e9000-0x00000000020f2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem76: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020f2000-0x00000000020fb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem77: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020fb000-0x00000000020fe000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem78: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000020fe000-0x0000000002102000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem79: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002102000-0x0000000002108000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem80: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002108000-0x000000000211b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem81: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000211b000-0x000000000211e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem82: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000211e000-0x0000000002122000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem83: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002122000-0x0000000002126000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem84: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002126000-0x0000000002133000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem85: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002133000-0x000000000213e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem86: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000213e000-0x0000000002149000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem87: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002149000-0x000000000214a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem88: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000214a000-0x0000000002150000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem89: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002150000-0x0000000002156000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem90: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002156000-0x000000000215c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem91: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000215c000-0x000000000215e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem92: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000215e000-0x0000000002162000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem93: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002162000-0x0000000002165000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem94: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002165000-0x000000000216e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem95: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000216e000-0x0000000002170000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem96: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002170000-0x000000000217b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem97: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000217b000-0x000000000217c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem98: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000217c000-0x000000000217d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem99: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000217d000-0x0000000002181000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem100: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002181000-0x0000000002199000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem101: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002199000-0x00000000021ad000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem102: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021ad000-0x00000000021ae000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem103: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021ae000-0x00000000021b6000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem104: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021b6000-0x00000000021b8000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem105: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021b8000-0x00000000021cc000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem106: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021cc000-0x00000000021d9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem107: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021d9000-0x00000000021df000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem108: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021df000-0x00000000021e3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem109: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021e3000-0x00000000021e6000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem110: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021e6000-0x00000000021e9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem111: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021e9000-0x00000000021ec000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem112: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021ec000-0x00000000021f5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem113: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021f5000-0x00000000021fb000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem114: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000021fb000-0x0000000002200000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem115: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002200000-0x0000000002202000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem116: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002202000-0x0000000002203000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem117: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002203000-0x0000000002205000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem118: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002205000-0x000000000220e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem119: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000220e000-0x0000000002213000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem120: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002213000-0x000000000221b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem121: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000221b000-0x0000000002226000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem122: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002226000-0x000000000222c000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem123: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000222c000-0x0000000002234000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem124: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002234000-0x0000000002239000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem125: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002239000-0x000000000223b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem126: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000223b000-0x000000000223d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem127: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000223d000-0x000000000223f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem128: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000223f000-0x0000000002242000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem129: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002242000-0x0000000002244000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem130: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002244000-0x0000000002247000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem131: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002247000-0x000000000224d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem132: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000224d000-0x000000000225a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem133: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000225a000-0x000000000229b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem134: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000229b000-0x00000000022a3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem135: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022a3000-0x00000000022af000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem136: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022af000-0x00000000022bd000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem137: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022bd000-0x00000000022bf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem138: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022bf000-0x00000000022c1000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem139: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c1000-0x00000000022c2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem140: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c2000-0x00000000022c5000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem141: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c5000-0x00000000022c8000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem142: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022c8000-0x00000000022cd000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem143: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022cd000-0x00000000022cf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem144: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022cf000-0x00000000022d2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem145: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022d2000-0x00000000022d7000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem146: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022d7000-0x00000000022de000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem147: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022de000-0x00000000022e2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem148: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022e2000-0x00000000022ed000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem149: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022ed000-0x00000000022f3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem150: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x00000000022f3000-0x0000000002305000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem151: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002305000-0x0000000002307000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem152: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002307000-0x000000000232b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem153: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000232b000-0x000000000233f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem154: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000233f000-0x0000000002358000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem155: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002358000-0x0000000002365000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem156: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000002365000-0x000000000ba17000) (150MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem157: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba17000-0x000000000ba1a000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem158: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba1a000-0x000000000ba22000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem159: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba22000-0x000000000ba25000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem160: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba25000-0x000000000ba26000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem161: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba26000-0x000000000ba27000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem162: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba27000-0x000000000ba86000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem163: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba86000-0x000000000ba8b000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem164: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba8b000-0x000000000ba91000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem165: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba91000-0x000000000ba95000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem166: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba95000-0x000000000ba9d000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem167: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ba9d000-0x000000000bab4000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem168: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000bab4000-0x000000000babc000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem169: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000babc000-0x000000000babf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem170: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000babf000-0x000000000cd73000) (18MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem171: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd73000-0x000000000cd74000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem172: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd74000-0x000000000cd75000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem173: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd75000-0x000000000cd93000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem174: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd93000-0x000000000cd96000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem175: type=1, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cd96000-0x000000000cec5000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem176: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000cec5000-0x000000000ceea000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem177: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000ceea000-0x000000000d398000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem178: type=1, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000d398000-0x000000000d86a000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem179: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000d86a000-0x000000000e000000) (7MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem180: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000e000000-0x000000000f3e5000) (19MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem181: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000000f3e5000-0x0000000020000000) (268MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem182: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000020000000-0x0000000020200000) (2MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem183: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000020200000-0x0000000040004000) (510MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem184: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000040004000-0x0000000040005000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem185: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000040005000-0x000000007e2e0000) (994MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem186: type=2, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000007e2e0000-0x0000000080000000) (29MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem187: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000080000000-0x0000000099f5c000) (415MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem188: type=5, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099f5c000-0x0000000099f68000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem189: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099f68000-0x0000000099f75000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem190: type=5, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099f75000-0x0000000099faf000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem191: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x0000000099faf000-0x000000009a00f000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem192: type=5, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009a00f000-0x000000009a024000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem193: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009a024000-0x000000009a032000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem194: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009a032000-0x000000009a04e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem195: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a04e000-0x000000009a3a2000) (3MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem196: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a3a2000-0x000000009a4e3000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem197: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a4e3000-0x000000009a4ec000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem198: type=0, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a4ec000-0x000000009a54e000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem199: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a54e000-0x000000009a725000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem200: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a725000-0x000000009a7c2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem201: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7c2000-0x000000009a7c9000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem202: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7c9000-0x000000009a7ce000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem203: type=9, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7ce000-0x000000009a7d2000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem204: type=9, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7d2000-0x000000009a7d3000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem205: type=10, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a7d3000-0x000000009a816000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem206: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a816000-0x000000009a95f000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem207: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009a95f000-0x000000009adf5000) (4MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem208: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009adf5000-0x000000009ae04000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem209: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae04000-0x000000009ae16000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem210: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae16000-0x000000009ae17000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem211: type=3, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae17000-0x000000009ae19000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem212: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009ae19000-0x000000009ae20000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem213: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, range=[0x000000009ae20000-0x000000009aff2000) (1MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem214: type=4, attr=0xf, range=[0x000000009aff2000-0x000000009b000000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem215: type=7, attr=0xf, range=[0x0000000100000000-0x00000003ff000000) (12272MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem216: type=0, attr=0x8000000000000000, range=[0x000000009b800000-0x000000009fa00000) (66MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem217: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000f8000000-0x00000000fc000000) (64MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem218: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fec00000-0x00000000fec01000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem219: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fed00000-0x00000000fed04000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem220: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fed1c000-0x00000000fed20000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem221: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee01000) (0MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: efi: mem222: type=11, attr=0x8000000000000001, range=[0x00000000ff000000-0x0000000100000000) (16MB)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: SMBIOS 2.7 present.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMI: BIOSTAR Group TZ77MXE/TZ77MXE, BIOS 4.6.5 04/25/2012
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x00000000-0x00000fff] usable ==> reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: remove [mem 0x000a0000-0x000fffff] usable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: No AGP bridge found
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: last_pfn = 0x3ff000 max_arch_pfn = 0x400000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: MTRR default type: uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: MTRR fixed ranges enabled:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 00000-9FFFF write-back
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: A0000-BFFFF uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: C0000-DBFFF write-protect
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DC000-DFFFF uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: E0000-FFFFF write-protect
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: MTRR variable ranges enabled:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 0 base 000000000 mask C00000000 write-back
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 1 base 0C0000000 mask FC0000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 2 base 0A0000000 mask FE0000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 3 base 09C000000 mask FFC000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 4 base 09B800000 mask FFF800000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 5 base 3FF000000 mask FFF000000 uncachable
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 6 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 7 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 8 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: 9 disabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: x86 PAT enabled: cpu 0, old 0x7040600070406, new 0x7010600070106
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: original variable MTRRs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 0, base: 0GB, range: 16GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 1, base: 3GB, range: 1GB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 2, base: 2560MB, range: 512MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 3, base: 2496MB, range: 64MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 4, base: 2488MB, range: 8MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 5, base: 16368MB, range: 16MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: total RAM covered: 14760M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Found optimal setting for mtrr clean up
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: gran_size: 64K chunk_size: 128M num_reg: 7 lose cover RAM: 0G
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: New variable MTRRs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 0, base: 0GB, range: 2GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 1, base: 2GB, range: 512MB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 2, base: 2488MB, range: 8MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 3, base: 2496MB, range: 64MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 4, base: 4GB, range: 4GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 5, base: 8GB, range: 8GB, type WB
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: reg 6, base: 16368MB, range: 16MB, type UC
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: update [mem 0x9b800000-0xffffffff] usable ==> reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: last_pfn = 0x9b000 max_arch_pfn = 0x400000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: found SMP MP-table at [mem 0x000fcc30-0x000fcc3f] mapped at [ffff8800000fcc30]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Base memory trampoline at [ffff880000098000] 98000 size 24576
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x00000000-0x000fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc4000, 0x0ffc4fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc5000, 0x0ffc5fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc6000, 0x0ffc6fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x3fee00000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x3fee00000-0x3feffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc7000, 0x0ffc7fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x3fc000000-0x3fedfffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x3fc000000-0x3fedfffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x380000000-0x3fbffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x380000000-0x3fbffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: BRK [0x0ffc8000, 0x0ffc8fff] PGTABLE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x00100000-0x1fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x00100000-0x001fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x00200000-0x1fffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x20200000-0x40003fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x20200000-0x3fffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x40000000-0x40003fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x40005000-0x99f5bfff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x40005000-0x401fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x40200000-0x99dfffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99e00000-0x99f5bfff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9a816000-0x9ae1ffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9a816000-0x9a9fffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9aa00000-0x9adfffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9ae00000-0x9ae1ffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9aff2000-0x9affffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9aff2000-0x9affffff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x100000000-0x37fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x100000000-0x37fffffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: RAMDISK: [mem 0x7e2e0000-0x7fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: RSDP 000000009a7b1000 00024 (v02 ALASKA)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: XSDT 000000009a7b1070 00064 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: FACP 000000009a7ba928 000F4 (v04 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: DSDT 000000009a7b1170 097B8 (v02 ALASKA A M I 00000015 INTL 20051117)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: FACS 000000009a7ccf80 00040
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: APIC 000000009a7baa20 00072 (v03 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: MCFG 000000009a7baa98 0003C (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 MSFT 00000097)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: HPET 000000009a7baad8 00038 (v01 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI. 00000005)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: SSDT 000000009a7bab10 00460 (v01 IdeRef IdeTable 00001000 INTL 20091112)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: SSDT 000000009a7baf70 009AA (v01 PmRef Cpu0Ist 00003000 INTL 20051117)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: SSDT 000000009a7bb920 00A92 (v01 PmRef CpuPm 00003000 INTL 20051117)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: BGRT 000000009a7bc3b8 00038 (v00 ALASKA A M I 01072009 AMI 00010013)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: No NUMA configuration found
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Faking a node at [mem 0x0000000000000000-0x00000003feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initmem setup node 0 [mem 0x00000000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NODE_DATA [mem 0x3fefdc000-0x3fefeffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [ffffea0000000000-ffffea000fffffff] PMD -> [ffff8803efe00000-ffff8803fe5fffff] on node 0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Zone ranges:
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA [mem 0x00001000-0x00ffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA32 [mem 0x01000000-0xffffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Normal [mem 0x100000000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Movable zone start for each node
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Early memory node ranges
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x00001000-0x0009efff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x00100000-0x1fffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x20200000-0x40003fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x40005000-0x99f5bfff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x9a816000-0x9ae1ffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x9aff2000-0x9affffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: node 0: [mem 0x100000000-0x3feffffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: On node 0 totalpages: 3773201
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA zone: 64 pages used for memmap
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA zone: 25 pages reserved
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA zone: 3998 pages, LIFO batch:0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA32 zone: 9806 pages used for memmap
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: DMA32 zone: 627571 pages, LIFO batch:31
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Normal zone: 49088 pages used for memmap
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Normal zone: 3141632 pages, LIFO batch:31
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: PM-Timer IO Port: 0x408
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: Local APIC address 0xfee00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x01] lapic_id[0x00] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x02] lapic_id[0x02] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x03] lapic_id[0x04] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC (acpi_id[0x04] lapic_id[0x06] enabled)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: LAPIC_NMI (acpi_id[0xff] high edge lint[0x1])
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IOAPIC (id[0x02] address[0xfec00000] gsi_base[0])
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: IOAPIC[0]: apic_id 2, version 32, address 0xfec00000, GSI 0-23
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 0 global_irq 2 dfl dfl)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: INT_SRC_OVR (bus 0 bus_irq 9 global_irq 9 high level)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IRQ0 used by override.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IRQ2 used by override.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: IRQ9 used by override.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Using ACPI (MADT) for SMP configuration information
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: HPET id: 0x8086a701 base: 0xfed00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: Allowing 4 CPUs, 0 hotplug CPUs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: nr_irqs_gsi: 40
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000009f000 – 00000000000a0000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000000a0000 – 0000000000100000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd73000 – 000000000cd74000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd73000 – 000000000cd74000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd75000 – 000000000cd76000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd85000 – 000000000cd86000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd86000 – 000000000cd87000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cd92000 – 000000000cd93000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cec5000 – 000000000cec6000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cedc000 – 000000000cedd000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cedd000 – 000000000cede000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000000cee9000 – 000000000ceea000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 0000000020000000 – 0000000020200000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 0000000040004000 – 0000000040005000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 0000000099f5c000 – 000000009a54e000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009a54e000 – 000000009a7ce000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009a7ce000 – 000000009a7d3000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009a7d3000 – 000000009a816000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009ae20000 – 000000009aff2000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009b000000 – 000000009b800000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009b800000 – 000000009fa00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 000000009fa00000 – 00000000f8000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000f8000000 – 00000000fc000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fc000000 – 00000000fec00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fec00000 – 00000000fec01000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fec01000 – 00000000fed00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed00000 – 00000000fed04000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed04000 – 00000000fed1c000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed1c000 – 00000000fed20000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fed20000 – 00000000fee00000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fee00000 – 00000000fee01000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000fee01000 – 00000000ff000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registered nosave memory: 00000000ff000000 – 0000000100000000
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: e820: [mem 0x9fa00000-0xf7ffffff] available for PCI devices
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Booting paravirtualized kernel on bare hardware
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: setup_percpu: NR_CPUS:128 nr_cpumask_bits:128 nr_cpu_ids:4 nr_node_ids:1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PERCPU: Embedded 28 pages/cpu @ffff8803fec00000 s85120 r8192 d21376 u524288
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: pcpu-alloc: s85120 r8192 d21376 u524288 alloc=1*2097152
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: pcpu-alloc: [0] 0 1 2 3
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Built 1 zonelists in Zone order, mobility grouping on. Total pages: 3714218
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Policy zone: Normal
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Kernel command line: vmlinuz-fedup.efi root=UUID=1d3092fc-265e-4860-a609-d6a16c1a6458 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 KEYTABLE=us SYSFONT=True rd.md=0 rd.luks=0 ro LANG=en_US.UTF-8 rhgb quiet upgrade systemd.unit=system-upgrade.target plymouth.splash=fedup selinux=0 initrd=.\initramfs-fedup.img
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PID hash table entries: 4096 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: __ex_table already sorted, skipping sort
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: xsave: enabled xstate_bv 0x7, cntxt size 0x340
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Checking aperture…
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: No AGP bridge found
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Memory: 14542856k/16760832k available (6471k kernel code, 1668028k absent, 549948k reserved, 6766k data, 1352k init)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: SLUB: Genslabs=15, HWalign=64, Order=0-3, MinObjects=0, CPUs=4, Nodes=1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Hierarchical RCU implementation.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: RCU restricting CPUs from NR_CPUS=128 to nr_cpu_ids=4.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NR_IRQS:8448 nr_irqs:712 16
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Console: colour dummy device 80×25
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: console [tty0] enabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: allocated 60817408 bytes of page_cgroup
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: please try ‘cgroup_disable=memory’ option if you don’t want memory cgroups
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: hpet clockevent registered
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: tsc: Fast TSC calibration using PIT
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: tsc: Detected 3092.888 MHz processor
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Calibrating delay loop (skipped), value calculated using timer frequency.. 6185.77 BogoMIPS (lpj=3092888)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: pid_max: default: 32768 minimum: 301
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99f5c000-0x99f67fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99f5c000-0x99f67fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99f68000-0x99f74fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99f68000-0x99f74fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99f75000-0x99faefff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99f75000-0x99faefff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x99faf000-0x9a00efff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x99faf000-0x9a00efff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9a00f000-0x9a023fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9a00f000-0x9a023fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9a024000-0x9a04dfff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9a024000-0x9a04dfff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9ae20000-0x9aff1fff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9ae20000-0x9aff1fff] page 4k
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: init_memory_mapping: [mem 0x9b800000-0x9f9fffff]
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: [mem 0x9b800000-0x9f9fffff] page 2M
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Security Framework initialized
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: SELinux: Disabled at boot.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Dentry cache hash table entries: 2097152 (order: 12, 16777216 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Inode-cache hash table entries: 1048576 (order: 11, 8388608 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Mount-cache hash table entries: 256
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuacct
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys memory
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys devices
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys freezer
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys net_cls
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys blkio
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys perf_event
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: CPU: Physical Processor ID: 0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: CPU: Processor Core ID: 0
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ENERGY_PERF_BIAS: Set to ‘normal’, was ‘performance’
ENERGY_PERF_BIAS: View and update with x86_energy_perf_policy(8)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: mce: CPU supports 9 MCE banks
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: CPU0: Thermal monitoring enabled (TM1)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Last level iTLB entries: 4KB 512, 2MB 0, 4MB 0
Last level dTLB entries: 4KB 512, 2MB 32, 4MB 32
tlb_flushall_shift: 1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Freeing SMP alternatives: 24k freed
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: Core revision 20130117
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: All ACPI Tables successfully acquired
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ftrace: allocating 24403 entries in 96 pages
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ..TIMER: vector=0x30 apic1=0 pin1=2 apic2=-1 pin2=-1
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: CPU0: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3450 CPU @ 3.10GHz (fam: 06, model: 3a, stepping: 09)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: TSC deadline timer enabled
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Performance Events: PEBS fmt1+, 16-deep LBR, IvyBridge events, Intel PMU driver.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … version: 3
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … bit width: 48
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … generic registers: 8
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … value mask: 0000ffffffffffff
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … max period: 000000007fffffff
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … fixed-purpose events: 3
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: … event mask: 00000007000000ff
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NMI watchdog: enabled on all CPUs, permanently consumes one hw-PMU counter.
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: Booting Node 0, Processors #1 #2 #3 OK
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: Brought up 4 CPUs
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: smpboot: Total of 4 processors activated (24743.10 BogoMIPS)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: devtmpfs: initialized
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0x9a54e000-0x9a7cdfff] (2621440 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PM: Registering ACPI NVS region [mem 0x9a7d3000-0x9a815fff] (274432 bytes)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: atomic64 test passed for x86-64 platform with CX8 and with SSE
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: RTC time: 2:51:30, date: 06/23/13
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: NET: Registered protocol family 16
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: ACPI: bus type PCI registered
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PCI: MMCONFIG for domain 0000 [bus 00-3f] at [mem 0xf8000000-0xfbffffff] (base 0xf8000000)
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PCI: MMCONFIG at [mem 0xf8000000-0xfbffffff] reserved in E820
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: PCI: Using configuration type 1 for base access
Jun 23 02:51:33 localhost kernel: bio: create slab

Источник: https://blog.fpmurphy.com/2013/07/using-fedup-to-update-an-efi-boot-stub-system-to-fedora-19.html

Download NOWMedia Player Classic 1.9.17 Crack with Serial Key Free Download Latest Version Media Player Classic 1.9.17 Crack If you’d like an alternative to Windows Media Player that plays just about every kind of audio and video file and is widely customizable and flexible enough to serve many roles, including DVD and Blu-Ray player, you … Read more

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Media Player Classic 1.9.17 Crack If you’d like an alternative to Windows Media Player that plays just about every kind of audio and video file and is widely customizable and flexible enough to serve many roles, including DVD and Blu-Ray player, you really only have a few choices, and one of them is Media Player Classic, aka MPC.

Actually, several others might be MPC too since this open-source freeware serves as the basis of more than one media player for Windows. The latest version is Media Player Classic-Home Cinema. MPC-HC is available in separate downloads for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. We tried the 64-bit version in Windows 7 Home Premium. Media Player Classic is a media player that stands out with its small size, low resource usage, and the many features it includes.

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Media Player Classic’s interface is, as the name suggests, classic in its retro, basic and traditional design. This media player can easily replace the four or five operating system’s built-in media players. Its only shortcoming is that you will have to manually download and install codecs to play the formats you want. Media Player Classic can easily load and run DVDs. One of its advantages is the fact you can slow down or accelerate playback speed.

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It also supports most audio formats. We were happily surprised to learn that this compact media player also includes sound filters and playlists. We were happily surprised to learn that this compact media player also includes sound filters and playlists. You can set hotkeys, but some users have lamented that learning how to set hotkeys and operate the system is not always as easy as they wish it would be.

You can set hotkeys, but some users have lamented that learning how to set hotkeys and operate the system is not always as easy as they wish it would be. The help file is not included within the player but is easily downloadable from the website. The biggest disappointments were the subtitles searching and downloading utility. Subtitle databases are offline (though this may change in the future). The address can be easily modified through the options menu. If you wish to watch a movie or listen to music in known or unknown formats you’ve downloaded from the Internet, and you don’t want to burden your computer with a heavy and sophisticated player, this media player makes for a viable alternative.

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– Activates hardware decoding by default, to get 4K and 8K playback!
– Supports 10bits and HDR
– Supports 360 video and 3D audio, up to Ambisonics 3rd order
– Allows audio passthrough for HD audio codecs
– Can stream to Chromecast devices, even in formats not supported natively
– Can play Blu-Ray Java menus: BD-J
– VLC supports browsing of local network drives and NASThis is a dedicated 64-bit build for Windows and Mac users.

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  • Switched from hook to MinHook since it’s more actively maintained
  • Require a CPU processor with SSE2 instructions
  • Add context menu option to copy subtitle URL
  • Updated translations
  • Updated LAV Filters to
  • New Updated Little CMS to v2.8 (d41071e)
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  • HUV63-XFY85-H63N4-AVS5X-2HGYH
  • FYX3U-KTCJF-LYCRB-XRVF3-PSZE3M
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  • AVY5J-MYC6C-XR8MI-SE4FT-VR3GT
  • NHGS3-BXT9J-NAKI0-LBXUI-AREB7

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1: Click on Download Button.
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tail

The dmesg command returns a log that details all recent events. Messages resulting from the
attached USB flash drive are displayed at the bottom of the log. Record the name of the
connected device.

3. Switch to user root:

$ su -

4. Enter your root password when prompted.

5. Find the device node assigned to the drive. In this example, the drive name is sdd.

# dmesg

Red Hat Enterprise Linux-8-Performing A Standard RHEL Installation-En-US

Performing a standard RHEL installation

Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 using the graphical user interface

Last Updated: 2019-10-21


Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation
Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 using the graphical user interface
Legal Notice
Copyright © 2019 Red Hat, Inc.

The text of and illustrations in this document are licensed by Red Hat under a Creative Commons
Attribution–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license ("CC-BY-SA"). An explanation of CC-BY-SA is
available at
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
. In accordance with CC-BY-SA, if you distribute this document or an adaptation of it, you must
provide the URL for the original version.

Red Hat, as the licensor of this document, waives the right to enforce, and agrees not to assert,
Section 4d of CC-BY-SA to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law.

Red Hat, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the Shadowman logo, the Red Hat logo, JBoss, OpenShift,
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and other countries.

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All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Abstract
This document is for users who want to perform a standard Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 installation
using the graphical user interface.
Table of Contents

Table of Contents
. . . . . . . . . . . . . FEEDBACK
PROVIDING . . . . . . . . . . . . ON
. . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .DOCUMENTATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 1.. .INTRODUCTION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1. SUPPORTED ARCHITECTURES 8
1.2. INSTALLATION TERMINOLOGY 8

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 2.
. . INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .METHODS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional resources 9
2.1. PERFORMING A QUICK INSTALL ON AMD64, INTEL 64, AND 64-BIT ARM 9
Prerequisites 9
Procedure 9
Additional resources 10

. . . . . . .I.. PERFORMING
PART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A
. . GRAPHICAL
. . . . . . . . . . . . . INSTALL
. . . . . . . . . .ON
. . . .AMD64,
. . . . . . . . .INTEL
. . . . . . 64,
. . . .AND
. . . . . 64-BIT
. . . . . . . .ARM
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
..............

. . . . . . . . . . . 3.
CHAPTER . . INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WORKFLOW
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
..............

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 4.
. . .PREPARING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .FOR
. . . . .YOUR
. . . . . . INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
..............
4.1. RECOMMENDED STEPS 14
4.2. CHECK SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 14
Additional resources 14
4.3. CHOOSE AN INSTALLATION BOOT METHOD 14
Additional Resources 15
4.4. SELECT THE REQUIRED INSTALLATION IMAGE 15
Additional Resources 16
4.5. DOWNLOADING THE INSTALLATION ISO IMAGE 16
4.5.1. Downloading an ISO image from the Customer Portal 16
4.5.2. Downloading an ISO image using curl 17
Prerequisites 17
Procedure 17
4.6. CREATING INSTALLATION MEDIA 18
4.6.1. Creating a bootable DVD or CD 18
4.6.2. Creating a bootable USB device on Linux 18
Prerequisites 18
Procedure 18
4.6.3. Creating a bootable USB device on Windows 20
Prerequisites 20
Procedure 20
4.6.4. Creating a bootable USB device on Mac OS X 21
Prerequisites 21
Procedure 21
4.7. PREPARING AN INSTALLATION SOURCE 22
4.7.1. Types of installation source 22
4.7.2. Specify the installation source 23
4.7.3. Ports for network-based installation 23
4.7.4. Creating an installation source on an NFS server 24
Prerequisites 24
Procedure 24
4.7.5. Creating an installation source using HTTP or HTTPS 25
Prerequisites 25
Procedure 25
Additional resources 26

1
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

4.7.6. Creating an installation source using FTP 27


Prerequisites 27
Procedure 27

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 5.
. . BOOTING
. . . . . . . . . . . THE
. . . . .INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
..............
5.1. TYPES OF BOOT OPTIONS 30
5.2. EDITING BOOT OPTIONS 30
Editing the boot: prompt in BIOS 30
Editing the > prompt 31
Editing the GRUB2 menu 31
5.3. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION FROM A USB, CD, OR DVD 31
5.4. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION FROM A NETWORK USING PXE 32
Prerequisites 33
Procedure 33

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 6.
. . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .RHEL
. . . . . . USING
. . . . . . . .THE
. . . . GRAPHICAL
. . . . . . . . . . . . . USER
. . . . . . .INTERFACE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
..............
6.1. GRAPHICAL INSTALLATION WORKFLOW 35
6.2. CONFIGURING LANGUAGE AND LOCATION SETTINGS 35
6.3. THE INSTALLATION SUMMARY WINDOW 36
6.4. CONFIGURING LOCALIZATION OPTIONS 38
6.4.1. Configuring keyboard, language, and time and date settings 38
6.5. CONFIGURING SOFTWARE OPTIONS 40
6.5.1. Configuring installation source 40
6.5.2. Configuring software selection 42
6.6. CONFIGURING SYSTEM OPTIONS 43
6.6.1. Configuring installation destination 43
Procedure 44
6.6.1.1. Configuring boot loader 47
6.6.2. Configuring Kdump 48
Procedure 48
6.6.3. Configuring network and host name options 48
6.6.3.1. Configuring network and host name 49
6.6.3.2. Adding a virtual network interface 49
6.6.3.3. Editing network interface configuration 50
6.6.3.4. Enabling or Disabling the Interface Connection 51
6.6.3.5. Setting up Static IPv4 or IPv6 Settings 51
6.6.3.6. Configuring Routes 52
6.6.3.7. Additional resources 52
6.6.4. Configuring security policy 52
6.6.4.1. About security policy 52
6.6.4.2. Configuring a security policy 53
6.6.4.3. Related information 53
6.6.5. Configuring System Purpose 54
6.6.5.1. Introduction to System Purpose 54
Additional resources 55
6.6.5.2. Configuring System Purpose using the graphical user interface 55
Procedure 55
6.6.5.3. System Purpose status 56
6.7. CONFIGURING STORAGE DEVICES 57
6.7.1. Storage device selection 57
6.7.2. Filtering storage devices 58
6.7.3. Using advanced storage options 59
6.7.3.1. Discovering and starting an iSCSI session 59

2
Table of Contents

6.7.3.2. Configuring FCoE parameters 60


6.7.3.3. Configuring DASD storage devices 61
6.7.3.4. Configuring FCP devices 62
6.7.4. Installing to an NVDIMM device 63
6.7.4.1. Criteria for using an NVDIMM device as an installation target 63
6.7.4.2. Configuring an NVDIMM device using the graphical installation mode 63
6.8. CONFIGURING MANUAL PARTITIONING 64
6.8.1. Starting manual partitioning 65
6.8.2. Adding a mount point file system 66
6.8.3. Configuring a mount point file system 67
6.8.4. Customizing a partition or volume 68
6.8.5. Preserving the /home directory 70
Prerequisites 70
Procedure 70
6.8.6. Creating software RAID 71
6.8.7. Creating an LVM logical volume 72
6.8.8. Configuring an LVM logical volume 73
6.9. STARTING THE INSTALLATION PROGRAM 74
6.9.1. Beginning installation 74
6.9.2. Configuring a root password 74
6.9.3. Creating a user account 75
6.9.3.1. Editing advanced user settings 76
6.9.4. Graphical installation complete 77

. . . . . . . . . . . 7.
CHAPTER . . COMPLETING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .POST-INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TASKS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
..............
7.1. COMPLETING INITIAL SETUP 78
Prerequisite 78
Procedure 78
Additional resources 79
7.2. REGISTERING YOUR SYSTEM USING THE COMMAND LINE 79
7.3. REGISTERING YOUR SYSTEM USING THE SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER USER INTERFACE 81
Prerequisites 81
Procedure 81
Additional resources 81
7.4. REGISTRATION ASSISTANT 81
7.5. CONFIGURING SYSTEM PURPOSE USING THE COMMAND LINE 82
Prerequisites 82
Procedure 82
7.5.1. Redefining subscriptions using the syspurpose tool 83
Procedure 84
7.6. SECURING YOUR SYSTEM 84
Prerequisites 84
Procedure 84

. . . . . . . . . . . .A.
APPENDIX . . TROUBLESHOOTING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
..............
A.1. CONSOLES AND LOGGING DURING INSTALLATION 85
A.2. SAVING SCREENSHOTS 86
A.3. RESUMING AN INTERRUPTED DOWNLOAD ATTEMPT 86

. . . . . . . . . . . .B.
APPENDIX . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .REQUIREMENTS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REFERENCE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
..............
B.1. HARDWARE COMPATIBILITY 87
B.2. SUPPORTED INSTALLATION TARGETS 87
B.3. SYSTEM SPECIFICATIONS 87
B.4. DISK AND MEMORY REQUIREMENTS 88

3
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

B.5. RAID REQUIREMENTS 89

.APPENDIX
. . . . . . . . . . .C.
. . .PARTITIONING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REFERENCE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
..............
C.1. SUPPORTED DEVICE TYPES 91
C.2. SUPPORTED FILE SYSTEMS 91
C.3. SUPPORTED RAID TYPES 92
C.4. RECOMMENDED PARTITIONING SCHEME 93
C.5. ADVICE ON PARTITIONS 95

.APPENDIX
. . . . . . . . . . .D.
. . .BOOT
. . . . . . OPTIONS
. . . . . . . . . . .REFERENCE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
..............
D.1. INSTALLATION SOURCE BOOT OPTIONS 98
D.2. NETWORK BOOT OPTIONS 102
Additional resources 104
D.3. CONSOLE BOOT OPTIONS 104
D.4. DEBUG BOOT OPTIONS 107
D.5. STORAGE BOOT OPTIONS 108
D.6. DEPRECATED BOOT OPTIONS 109
D.7. REMOVED BOOT OPTIONS 110

. . . . . . .II.. .INSTALLING
PART . . . . . . . . . . . . . RED
. . . . . HAT
. . . . . ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . . POWER
. . . . . . . . .SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . .LC
. . . SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
..............

. . . . . . . . . . . 8.
CHAPTER . . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .LC
. . .SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
..............
8.1. OVERVIEW 113
Additional Resources 113
8.1.1. Creating a bootable USB device on Linux 113
Prerequisites 113
Procedure 113
8.1.2. Creating a bootable USB device on Windows 115
Prerequisites 115
Procedure 115
8.1.3. Creating a bootable USB device on Mac OS X 116
Prerequisites 116
Procedure 116
8.2. COMPLETING THE PREREQUISITES AND BOOTING YOUR FIRMWARE 117
8.3. CONFIGURING THE IP ADDRESS IBM POWER 118
8.4. POWERING ON YOUR SERVER WITH IPMI 118
8.5. CHOOSE YOUR INSTALLATION METHOD ON IBM LC SERVERS 119
8.5.1. Configuring Petitboot for installation with USB device 119
8.5.2. Access BMC Advanced System Management interface to configure virtual media 121
8.6. COMPLETING YOUR LC SERVER INSTALLATION 122

. . . . . . .III.
PART . . INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . IBM
. . . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .AC
. . . SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
...............

. . . . . . . . . . . 9.
CHAPTER . . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .ACCELERATED
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SERVERS
......................
124
9.1. OVERVIEW 124
Additional resources 124
9.2. COMPLETING THE PREREQUISITES AND BOOTING YOUR FIRMWARE 124
9.3. CONFIGURING THE FIRMWARE IP ADDRESS 125
9.4. POWERING ON YOUR SERVER WITH OPENBMC COMMANDS 126
9.5. CHOOSE YOUR INSTALLATION METHOD ON IBM ACCELERATED SERVERS 127
9.6. CONFIGURING PETITBOOT FOR NETWORK INSTALLATION 127
9.7. CONFIGURING PETITBOOT FOR INSTALLATION WITH USB DEVICE ON ACCELERATED SERVERS 128
9.8. COMPLETING YOUR ACCELERATED SERVER INSTALLATION 129

4
Table of Contents

. . . . . . .IV.
PART . . .INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . RED
. . . . . HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .LINUX
. . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . . POWER
. . . . . . . . .SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . .L. .SERVERS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
...............

. . . . . . . . . . . 10.
CHAPTER . . . INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . .ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . LINUX
. . . . . . . .ON
. . . IBM
. . . . .POWER
. . . . . . . . SYSTEM
. . . . . . . . . .L. SERVER
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
..............
10.1. OVERVIEW 131
10.2. COMPLETING THE PREREQUISITES AND BOOTING YOUR FIRMWARE ON L SERVER 131
10.3. CONNECTING TO ASMI WITH DHCP 132
10.4. CONNECTING TO ASMI WITH STATIC IP ADDRESS 132
10.5. ENABLING IPMI 134
10.6. POWERING ON YOUR L SERVER WITH IPMI 134
10.7. POWERING ON YOUR SYSTEM FROM A NOTEBOOK OR PC RUNNING LINUX 135
10.8. POWERING ON YOUR SYSTEM FROM A NOTEBOOK OR PC RUNNING WINDOWS 136
10.9. CONFIGURING PETITBOOT AND INSTALLING RED HAT ENTERPRISE LINUX 136

. . . . . . .V.
PART . . INSTALLING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .RED
. . . . .HAT
. . . . ENTERPRISE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . LINUX
. . . . . . . ON
. . . . IBM
. . . . .Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
...............

.CHAPTER
. . . . . . . . . . 11.
. . .PREPARING
. . . . . . . . . . . . .FOR
. . . . .INSTALLATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ON
. . . .IBM
. . . .Z
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
...............
11.1. OVERVIEW OF THE IBM Z INSTALLATION PROCESS 139
11.2. CUSTOMIZING BOOT PARAMETERS 139
11.3. BOOTING THE INSTALLATION 141
11.3.1. Booting the installation 141
11.4. PLANNING FOR INSTALLATION ON IBM Z 141
11.4.1. Pre-installation 141
Additional Resources 142
11.5. INSTALLING UNDER Z/VM 142
11.6. USING PARAMETER AND CONFIGURATION FILES ON IBM Z 144
11.7. REQUIRED CONFIGURATION FILE PARAMETERS ON IBM Z 144
11.8. IBM Z/VM CONFIGURATION FILE 145
11.9. INSTALLATION NETWORK PARAMETERS ON IBM Z 145
11.10. PARAMETERS FOR KICKSTART INSTALLATIONS ON IBM Z 148
11.11. MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS ON IBM Z 149
11.12. SAMPLE PARAMETER FILE AND CMS CONFIGURATION FILE ON IBM Z 150

. . . . . . . . . . . 12.
CHAPTER . . . CONFIGURING
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A. .LINUX
. . . . . . . INSTANCE
. . . . . . . . . . . .ON
. . . IBM
. . . . .Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
..............
12.1. ADDING DASDS 151
12.2. DYNAMICALLY SETTING DASDS ONLINE 151
12.3. PREPARING A NEW DASD WITH LOW-LEVEL FORMATTING 152
12.4. PERSISTENTLY SETTING DASDS ONLINE 153
12.5. DASDS THAT ARE PART OF THE ROOT FILE SYSTEM 153
12.6. FCP LUNS THAT ARE PART OF THE ROOT FILE SYSTEM 155
12.7. FCP LUNS THAT ARE NOT PART OF THE ROOT FILE SYSTEM 157
12.8. ADDING A QETH DEVICE 158
12.9. DYNAMICALLY ADDING A QETH DEVICE 158
12.10. PERSISTENTLY ADDING A QETH DEVICE 160
12.11. CONFIGURING AN IBM Z NETWORK DEVICE FOR NETWORK ROOT FILE SYSTEM 163

5
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

6
PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON RED HAT DOCUMENTATION

PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON RED HAT DOCUMENTATION


We appreciate your input on our documentation. Please let us know how we could make it better. To do
so:

For simple comments on specific passages, make sure you are viewing the documentation in the
Multi-page HTML format. Highlight the part of text that you want to comment on. Then, click
the Add Feedback pop-up that appears below the highlighted text, and follow the displayed
instructions.

For submitting more complex feedback, create a Bugzilla ticket:

1. Go to the Bugzilla website.

2. As the Component, use Documentation.

3. Fill in the Description field with your suggestion for improvement. Include a link to the
relevant part(s) of documentation.

4. Click Submit Bug.

7
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 delivers a stable, secure, consistent foundation across hybrid cloud
deployments with the tools needed to deliver workloads faster with less effort. It can be deployed as a
guest on supported hypervisors and Cloud provider environments as well as deployed on physical
infrastructure, so your applications can take advantage of innovations in the leading hardware
architecture platforms.

1.1. SUPPORTED ARCHITECTURES


Red Hat Enterprise Linux supports the following architectures:

AMD and Intel 64-bit architectures

The 64-bit ARM architecture

IBM Power Systems, Little Endian

IBM Z

1.2. INSTALLATION TERMINOLOGY


This section describes Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation terminology. Different terminology can be
used for the same concepts, depending on its upstream or downstream origin.

Anaconda: The operating system installer used in Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and their
derivatives. Anaconda is a set of Python modules and scripts with additional files like Gtk widgets
(written in C), systemd units, and dracut libraries. Together, they form a tool that allows users to set
parameters of the resulting (target) system. In this document, the term installation program refers to
the installation aspect of Anaconda.

8
CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION METHODS

CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION METHODS


You can install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using one of the following methods:

Quick install
Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures using the
graphical user interface. The quick installation assumes that you are familiar with Red Hat
Enterprise Linux and your environment, and that you can accept the default settings provided by the
installation program.
Graphical install
Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface and customize the graphical
settings for your specific requirements.
Automated install
Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using Kickstart. The automated installation allows you to perform
unattended operating system installation tasks.

Additional resources
To perform a graphical installation on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures using the
graphical user interface, see Chapter 3, Installation workflow.

To perform an installation on IBM Power System LC servers, see Section 8.1, “Overview”.

To perform an installation on IBM Power System AC servers, see Section 9.1, “Overview”.

To perform an installation on IBM Power System L servers, see Section 10.1, “Overview”.

To perform an installation on IBM Z, see Section 11.1, “Overview of the IBM Z installation
process”.

To perform an automated install using Kickstart, see the Performing an advanced RHEL
installation document.

2.1. PERFORMING A QUICK INSTALL ON AMD64, INTEL 64, AND 64-


BIT ARM
Follow this procedure to perform a quick installation on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures
using the graphical user interface. To complete this procedure you must be familiar with Red Hat
Enterprise Linux and your environment, and you must be able to accept the default settings provided by
the installation program.

Prerequisites

You have downloaded the required ISO image file. See Section 4.5, “Downloading the
installation ISO image” for more information.

You have created bootable installation media. See Section 4.6, “Creating installation media” for
more information.

You have booted the installation program and the boot menu is displayed. See Chapter 5,
Booting the installation for more information.

Procedure

9
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

1. From the boot menu, select Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0.

2. Press the Enter key on your keyboard.

3. From the Welcome to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0window, select your language and
location.

4. Click Continue to proceed to the Installation Summary window.

NOTE

The Installation Summary window is the central hub that you can use to
configure the Red Hat Enterprise Linux graphical user interface. The default
settings assigned by the installation program are displayed under each category.

5. From the Installation Summary window, accept the default Localization and Software options.

6. Select System > Installation Destination.

a. From the Local Standard Disks pane, select the target disk.

b. Click Done to accept the selection and the default setting of automatic partitioning, and
return to the Installation Summary window.

7. Select Network & Host Name.

a. Toggle the Ethernet switch to ON to enable network configuration.

i. Optional: Select a network device and click Configure to update the network interface
configuration.

b. Click Done to accept the changes and return to the Installation Summary window.

8. Optional: Select Security Policy.

a. Select the profile that you require, and click Select profile.

b. Click Done to accept the changes and return to the Installation Summary window.

9. Optional: Select System Purpose.

a. Select the role, service level agreement, and usage.

b. Click Done to accept the changes and return to the Installation Summary window.

10. Click Begin Installation to start the installation.

11. From the Configuration window, configure a root password and create a user account.

12. When the installation process is complete, click Reboot to restart the system.

13. From the Initial Setup window, accept the licensing agreement and register your system.

Additional resources

To learn more about how to prepare for your installation, see Chapter 4, Preparing for your
installation.

10
CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION METHODS

To learn more about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user interface, and
customizing the interface settings, see Section 6.1, “Graphical installation workflow”.

To learn more about how to register your system, see Chapter 7, Completing post-installation
tasks.

11
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

PART I. PERFORMING A GRAPHICAL INSTALL ON AMD64,


INTEL 64, AND 64-BIT ARM
This section describes how to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux on AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM
architectures using the graphical user interface.

12
CHAPTER 3. INSTALLATION WORKFLOW

CHAPTER 3. INSTALLATION WORKFLOW


This installation workflow contains the high-level steps for installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux on
AMD64, Intel 64, and 64-bit ARM architectures using the graphical user interface.

Procedure

1. Prepare for your installation by checking your system and hardware requirements, downloading
an installation image file, and creating bootable installation media.

2. Boot the installation program and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user
interface.

3. Complete post-installation tasks such as initial setup and system registration.

Additional resources

For more information about preparing for your installation, see Chapter 4, Preparing for your
installation.

For more information about booting the installation program, see Chapter 5, Booting the
installation.

For more information about installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux using the graphical user
interface, see Chapter 6, Installing RHEL using the Graphical User Interface

For more information about completing post-installation tasks, see Chapter 7, Completing post-
installation tasks.

13
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION


If you are new to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, it is important to prepare for your installation by reviewing
system requirements, downloading the required installation image, and creating installation media.

4.1. RECOMMENDED STEPS


Preparing for your installation consists of several steps.

NOTE

If you are new to Red Hat Enterprise Linux, complete steps 1 to 5.

If you are familiar with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, complete steps 3 to 5.

Procedure

1. Check system requirements.

2. Choose an installation boot method.

3. Select and download the installation image.

4. Create bootable installation media.

5. Prepare the installation source*

*Only required for the Boot ISO (minimal install) image.

4.2. CHECK SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS


If this is a first-time installation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux it is recommended that you review the
guidelines provided for system, hardware, security, memory, and RAID before installing. See Appendix B,
System requirements reference for more information.

Additional resources
For more information about securing Red Hat Enterprise Linux, see the Security hardening document.

4.3. CHOOSE AN INSTALLATION BOOT METHOD


There are several methods to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation program. The method you
choose depends on your installation media.

Full installation DVD or USB flash drive


Create a full installation DVD or USB flash drive using the Binary DVD ISO image. The DVD or USB
flash drive can be used as a boot device and as an installation source for installing software packages.
Due to the size of the Binary DVD ISO image, a DVD or USB flash drive are the recommended media
types.
Minimal installation DVD, CD, or USB flash drive
Create a minimal installation CD, DVD, or USB flash drive using the Boot ISO image, which contains
only the minimum files necessary to boot the system and start the installation program. The Boot
ISO image requires an installation source that contains the required software packages.
PXE Server

14
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

A preboot execution environment (PXE) server allows the installation program to boot over the
network. After a system boot, you must complete the installation from a different installation source,
such as a local hard drive or a network location.

Additional Resources

For instructions on how to create an installation DVD or USB flash drive, see Section 4.6,
“Creating installation media” for more information.

For instructions on how to create a bootable DVD, CD, and USB flash drive, see Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

For more information about PXE servers, see the Performing an advanced RHEL installation
document.

4.4. SELECT THE REQUIRED INSTALLATION IMAGE


Two Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 installation images are available from the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Binary DVD ISO image file


A full installation program that contains the BaseOS and AppStream repositories and allows you to
complete the installation without additional repositories. Installing Red Hat Enterprise Linux from the
Binary DVD ISO is the easiest and the recommended method of performing a standard RHEL
installation.

IMPORTANT

It is recommended that you use the Binary DVD ISO image file to install
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

You can use a Binary DVD for IBM Z to boot the installation program using a
SCSI DVD drive, or as an installation source.

Boot ISO image file


The Boot ISO image is a minimal installation that requires access to the BaseOS and AppStream
repositories to install software packages. The repositories are part of the Binary DVD ISO image that
is available for download from https://access.redhat.com/home. Download and unpack the Binary
DVD ISO image to access the repositories.

The following table contains information about the images that are available for the supported
architectures.

Table 4.1. Boot and Installation Images

Architecture Installation DVD Boot DVD

AMD64 and Intel 64 x86_64 Binary DVD ISO image file x86_64 Boot ISO image file

ARM 64 AArch64 Binary DVD ISO image AArch64 Boot ISO image file
file

15
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

Architecture Installation DVD Boot DVD

IBM POWER ppc64le Binary DVD ISO image ppc64le Boot ISO image file
file

IBM Z s390x Binary DVD ISO image file s390x Boot ISO image file

Additional Resources

For instructions on how to access the Binary DVD ISO image repositories, see Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

4.5. DOWNLOADING THE INSTALLATION ISO IMAGE


This section contains instructions about downloading a Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation image from
the Red Hat Customer Portal or by using the curl command.

4.5.1. Downloading an ISO image from the Customer Portal


Follow this procedure to download a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 ISO image from the Red Hat Customer
Portal.

NOTE

Red Hat recommends using the Binary DVD ISO image to install Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 8 as it contains all repositories and software packages, and does
not require any additional configuration.

If you download the Boot ISO image file, you must configure an installation
source to obtain the repositories and software packages. See Section 4.7,
“Preparing an installation source” for more information.

Prerequisites

You have an active Red Hat subscription.

You are logged in to the Product Downloads section of the Red Hat Customer Portal at
https://access.redhat.com/downloads.

Procedure

1. From the Product Downloads page, select the By Category tab.

2. Click the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 link.


The Download Red Hat Enterprise Linuxweb page opens.

3. From the Product Variant drop-down menu, select the variant that you require, for example
Red Hat Enterprise Linux for x86_64.

NOTE
16
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

NOTE

If you are unsure of the variant for your requirements, see


http://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/linux-platforms/enterprise-linux.

4. The Version drop-down menu defaults to 8.0.

5. The Architecture drop-down menu defaults to x86_64.


The Product Software tab displays the images, which include:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Binary DVDimage.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Boot ISOimage.

Additional images may be available, for example, preconfigured virtual machine images, but they
are beyond the scope of this document.

6. Click Download Now beside the ISO image that you require.

4.5.2. Downloading an ISO image using curl


Use the curl command to download installation images directly from a specific URL.

Prerequisites

Verify the curl package is installed:

If your distribution uses the yum package manager:

# yum install curl

If your distribution uses the dnf package manager:

# dnf install curl

If your distribution uses the apt package manager:

# apt update
# apt install curl

If your Linux distribution does not use yum, dnf, or apt, or if you do not use Linux, download
the most appropriate software package from the curl web site.

You have navigated to the Product Downloads section of the Red Hat Customer Portal at
https://access.redhat.com/downloads, and selected the variant, version, and architecture that
you require. You have right-clicked on the required ISO image file, and selected Copy Link
Location to copy the URL of the ISO image file to your clipboard.

Procedure

1. On the command line, enter a suitable directory, and run the following command to download
the file:

$ curl --output directory-path/filename.iso 'copied_link_location'

17
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Performing a standard RHEL installation

Replace directory-path with a path to the location where you want to save the file; replace
filename.iso with the ISO image name as displayed in the Customer Portal; replace
copied_link_location with the link that you have copied from the Customer Portal.

4.6. CREATING INSTALLATION MEDIA


This section contains information about using the ISO image file that you downloaded in Section 4.5,
“Downloading the installation ISO image” to create bootable physical installation media, such as a USB,
DVD, or CD.

NOTE

By default, the inst.stage2= boot option is used on the installation media and is set to a
specific label, for example, inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=RHEL8\x86_64. If you modify the
default label of the file system containing the runtime image, or if you use a customized
procedure to boot the installation system, you must verify that the label is set to the
correct value.

4.6.1. Creating a bootable DVD or CD


You can create a bootable installation DVD or CD using burning software and a CD/DVD burner. The
exact steps to produce a DVD or CD from an ISO image file vary greatly, depending on the operating
system and disc burning software installed. Consult your system’s burning software documentation for
the exact steps to burn a CD or DVD from an ISO image file.


WARNING

You can create a bootable DVD or CD using either the Binary DVD ISO image (full
install), or the Boot ISO image (minimal install). However, the Binary DVD ISO
image is larger than 4.7 GB, and as a result, it might not fit on a single-layer DVD. A
dual-layer DVD or USB key is recommended when using the Binary DVD ISO image
to create bootable installation media.

4.6.2. Creating a bootable USB device on Linux


Follow this procedure to create a bootable USB device on a Linux system.

Prerequisites

You have downloaded an installation ISO image as described in Section 4.5, “Downloading the
installation ISO image”.

The Binary DVD ISO image is larger than 4.7 GB, so you must have a USB flash drive that is
large enough to hold the ISO image.

Procedure

NOTE
18
CHAPTER 4. PREPARING FOR YOUR INSTALLATION

NOTE

This procedure is destructive and data on the USB flash drive is destroyed without a
warning.

1. Connect the USB flash drive to the system.

2. Open a terminal window and run the dmesg command:

$ dmesg

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