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A blender is the only machine in your kitchen that can produce a beverage from chunks of ice and fruit in less than 60 seconds. And no other blender we’ve tested since 2012 can reliably produce silky soups, spoon-thick smoothies, and stable emulsifications like the Vitamix 5200. Yes, it’s pricey, but we think its powerful motor, nuanced controls, and long-lasting reliability make it worth the investment.

In our tests, from 2012 to now, Vitamix blenders have always performed the best overall. The classic Vitamix 5200 is the only one we’ve tried that can make creamy peanut butter and puree hearty soup without spewing molten liquid up the sides of the jar. It doesn’t have any preset buttons, but it does offer the widest range of speeds (far wider than on the comparably priced Blendtec Designer 675) of any blender we’ve tested. It’s a favorite in many (if not most) professional kitchens and juice bars. We’ve also found the Vitamix 5200 to be one of the most reliable and durable blenders we’ve tested, and if the motor burns out within the seven-year warranty period, Vitamix will promptly replace the machine.

The Oster Versa Pro Series Blender is the best of a new breed of more budget-friendly high-powered blenders. Compared with similarly priced blenders, this 1,400-watt model offers more speed variations and runs more quietly; it’s also one of the few models that come with a tamper for bursting air pockets in thick mixtures. At 17½ inches tall, it will fit better on a counter under a cabinet than most other high-performance blenders. We don’t think this is the absolute best blender out there, and it doesn’t compare to Vitamix blenders in power and longevity (we burned out our Oster after two and a half years), but it does have serious blending skills, a user-friendly design, and a solid, seven-year warranty. If you don’t want to throw down almost half a grand on a powerful blender, the Oster is your best bet.

If you’re not ready to spring for the Vitamix, and you don’t mind trading the Oster’s longer warranty for a little more power, go for the 1,800-watt Cleanblend Blender. The Cleanblend’s strong motor helps pulverize berry seeds and ice, creating creamier smoothies and piña coladas than even the Vitamix can produce. This model’s jar is made of thick, durable Tritan plastic and has a comfortable, grippy handle. Unlike the Oster blender, the Cleanblend doesn’t have any preset buttons and doesn’t offer much variance between the low and high speeds. In our testing, the Cleanblend’s motor has held up better than the Oster’s and is still going strong after four years of regular use. But Cleanblend covers this blender with only a five-year warranty, in contrast to the seven years of coverage from both Vitamix and Oster. And since Cleanblend has been around only since 2013, we’re still a little uncertain of the company’s staying power and the reliability of its customer service.

Not everyone wants to spend $200, let alone over $400, on a blender. If you want a blender for whipping up the occasional sauce or smoothie, the KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender is the best model available for around $100. With a 48-ounce jar and a low profile, the K150 is the smallest blender we recommend in this guide. It produced coarser textures than any of our other picks did, and its motor isn’t nearly as powerful (so it’s more likely to burn out if overtaxed). Another compromise you make for the price is in the warranty, as unlike our other picks the KitchenAid is covered for only one year. But it’s a good, all-purpose blender that’s small enough to fit on the counter under most kitchen cabinets.

Why you should trust us

As a senior staff writer for Wirecutter, I’ve covered everything from chef’s knives to stand mixers, and I’ve tested every blender worth testing since 2014. I also have a breadth of cooking and entertaining knowledge from decades of working in restaurants and magazine test kitchens. This guide builds on the work of Christine Cyr Clisset, now a deputy editor at Wirecutter.

We reached out to Jonathan Cochran, a former blender salesperson who now runs the site Blender Dude, for his take on the best Vitamix and Blendtec models to test (his site has affiliate partnerships with both companies). For our original guide, authored by Seamus Bellamy, we consulted with Lisa McManus, an executive editor in charge of equipment testing at Cook’s Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines.

Blender vs. food processor: Which one should you get?

Although there’s some overlap in what they can do, blenders and food processors aren’t interchangeable appliances. A countertop blender is a better tool for making purees, quick sauces, and emulsifications (such as mayonnaise and vinaigrette), and it’s the only appliance that can whip berries and fibrous veggies into a silky-smooth texture. Because a blender’s jar is narrow and usually angled at the base, it creates a vortex that helps pass ingredients through the blades more frequently than in a food processor, yielding smoother textures.

With a little effort, you can also puree wet ingredients (such as tomatoes for sauce) in a food processor, but the doughnut-shaped container doesn’t handle liquids as well as a blender’s jar does—it tends to leak. A food processor works fine for thick purees like hummus and is great for sauces with a coarser texture like pesto. But it can’t make a good smoothie and—since you can’t control the speed of the blades—is liable to shoot hot soup everywhere. Instead, a food processor is best for chopping, slicing, and grating. With the right attachment, it can even mix and knead dough. Many people use food processors for mincing vegetables, but this appliance is also your best friend for easily grating cheese, slicing potatoes for a gratin, grinding fresh bread crumbs, or quickly cutting butter into flour to make pie dough.

In short, blenders liquefy, food processors chop and slice. Depending on your needs, you might choose one over the other, or you might want both. We have a guide to the best food processors, too, if you’re interested.

What type of blender should you get?

A countertop blender delivers the silkiest smoothies, daiquiris, soups, and sauces of any style of blender you can buy. It’s more versatile than a personal blender (which is meant mainly for smoothies) because it holds more and can handle hot liquids. It’s also more powerful than an immersion blender, which is great for pureeing soups directly in the pot or making a quick mayo but doesn’t yield the velvety textures you get from a good countertop blender.

That said, a blender’s performance and longevity are usually proportional to its cost. High-end blenders are more powerful and designed to puree the thickest mixtures without burning out, something that inexpensive blenders simply can’t do. If you want a kitchen workhorse—a machine that can tackle everything from hot soups and sauces to thick frozen concoctions—a full-size, high-powered blender is the best choice. How much you should spend on one depends on exactly what you’ll use it for. Below is a breakdown of what each of our picks will do for you.

Get our budget pick, the KitchenAid, if:

  • You use your blender only for the occasional smoothie, frozen drink, or soup.
  • You don’t blend nut butters or other motor-taxing mixtures.
  • A short, limited one-year warranty isn’t a concern.

Get our runner-up, the Oster, or our also-great pick, the Cleanblend, if:

  • You blend no more than a few times a week.
  • You rarely make nut butters.
  • A five- or seven-year warranty is important to you.

Get our top pick, the Vitamix, if:

  • Blending is part of your daily lifestyle.
  • You frequently blend thick, motor-taxing mixtures like nut butters and spoonable smoothies.
  • You want a blender with the widest range of speeds for easily doing everything from blending hot liquids to pulverizing ice cubes.
  • A seven-year warranty is important to you.

Alternatively, if you just want to make a daily smoothie, you might be better off with a NutriBullet (we’ve tested them all).

How we picked

Four blenders on a kitchen counter side by side.

Since 2012, we’ve researched or tested almost every decent household blender available, from budget models starting at $40 to powerful, high-performance models topping out at $700. In all this testing, we’ve found the following criteria to be the most important to look for in a blender:

Jar shape and motor strength

A great blender should be able to smoothly process tough items like fibrous kale, frozen berries, and ice without burning out the motor. How efficiently a blender does this depends on a combination of the blade length and position, the shape of the mixing jar, and the motor strength. All three of those elements combine to create a vortex that pulls food down around the blade.

In our testing, we’ve found that tall, tapered jars with a curved bottom develop a more consistent vortex than short, wide ones with a flat bottom. But the better blending that you get from a taller, tapered jar comes with a trade-off: A fully assembled blender might be too tall to fit under low-hanging cabinets. Blenders with wide, short jars are better for countertop storage, but you’re sacrificing performance for that convenience.

A more powerful motor also helps to create a better vortex and blends thick mixtures more easily than a weaker one. But a blender’s power rating isn’t easy information to come by. Most blender companies advertise only “peak horsepower,” a spec that’s misleading if you’re trying to determine a motor’s strength. A motor works at peak horsepower for just a fraction of a second, when you start the blender, in order to overcome inertia. Immediately after, the motor drops to its “rated horsepower,” which is the amount of power it can sustain without burning out. As explained on Cooking For Engineers, you can get a ballpark estimate of a blender’s rated horsepower by dividing its wattage by 746 (because 746 watts equals approximately one unit of electrical horsepower). This equation doesn’t account for efficiency, but it does offer a more realistic approximation of a blender’s power output.

We’ve found that tall, tapered jars with a curved bottom develop a more consistent vortex than short, wide ones with a flat bottom.

Jar material

Most of the blenders we’ve tested come with plastic jars. All of our picks have jars made of BPA-free Tritan plastic, which is very durable. Many of the lower-end blenders we’ve tested don’t advertise which material their jars are made of beyond a “BPA-free” note. But the majority of these jars are probably made of polycarbonate, which is more rigid than Tritan but also very strong. Both materials will crack if heated too high, which is why these jars should not go in the dishwasher.

We understand that some folks prefer metal or glass jars. But you’d be hard-pressed to find a powerful blender with a glass jar, and there’s probably a good reason for this. As April Jones explains in her article on Cooking For Engineers: “Due to the high-speed blades and high horsepower motors, glass isn’t the safest option for professional-grade blenders. If a metal object, such as a spoon or knife, were accidentally left in the blender, a glass pitcher could shatter and potentially cause an injury. Using polycarbonate plastics or copolyester is a much safer option to avoid the hazard of broken glass.” Stainless steel jars are durable but opaque, and we like to monitor the progress of purees and emulsifications without having to remove the lid.

Price

Judging from buyer reviews, the holy grail for many home cooks seems to be a $50 or $100 blender that performs like a $500 Vitamix or Blendtec. But that isn’t realistic. High-end blenders priced at $150 and up—often called high-performance blenders—offer more power, produce much smoother textures, and generally last a lot longer than lower-end, under-$100 blenders. High-performance blenders also tackle tasks that you’d never want to try in a cheap blender, such as making peanut butter or milling grains.

That said, there’s nothing wrong with a cheap blender as long as you understand its limitations. Some people want an affordable midrange blender to make the occasional daiquiri or smoothie. So we’ve tested blenders in a wide range of prices with the understanding that, for the most part, you get what you pay for.

Warranty

The most common complaint we’ve found about cheap blenders is that their motors burn out easily and their jars crack or leak. But it’s not impossible for even higher-end blenders to encounter burnout. As Lisa McManus, executive editor in charge of equipment testing at Cook’s Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines, told our writer Seamus Bellamy in an interview for our 2012 guide, “Blenders have a really hard job to do in that little space. The motor is only so big. If you make it do something difficult every day, a lot of them burn out. It’s a lot of stress to put on a little machine.” This is why a long warranty is important, especially if you’re paying a lot for a blender. Vitamix, Oster, and Cleanblend models all come with warranties of five to seven years, and—at least for Vitamix machines—we’ve read plenty of owner reviews saying the blender lasts much longer. You can’t expect that level of performance from dirt-cheap blenders, which is probably why most of them come with only one-year limited warranties.

One of our authors, documenting the testing notes in a notebook.

Speed control

Whether you choose a blender with manual controls or preset functions is largely a personal preference. But we appreciate a powerful blender with a simple interface that includes an on/off switch, a pulse button, and a variable-speed dial. These easy controls allow you to quickly adjust the speed or turn off the machine if things get messy.

Preset programs for making smoothies, mixing soups, or crushing ice can be great if you want to multitask in the kitchen while blending. But we’ve also found that these functions rarely deliver purees as smooth as when we control the speed and time with the manual setting.

Tamper

In our years of testing, we’ve found that a tamper—a small plastic bat that lets you push food down into the blades—separates the great blenders from the good ones. When a blender is really cranking, air pockets tend to form around the blade, and a tamper allows you to burst them without having to stop the machine. The tamper that comes with a blender is designed to safely clear the blades of that particular model, as long as you use it with the lid on. Using a different tamper or another tool that might hit the moving blades is dangerous and could damage the machine. If your blender doesn’t come with a tamper, the only way you should burst air pockets is to turn the machine off, remove the jar from the base, and stir the mixture with a spoon.

One of our writers shown using a blender to make a smoothie.

So why don’t all blenders come with a tamper? Because forcing frozen and thick mixtures into the blades puts a lot of stress on the motor. Performance blenders that include tampers have powerful motors that can handle this stress—they’re designed for it. But cheaper blenders have weaker motors. If they were to include tampers, people would probably push these machines past their limits, ultimately prompting the motor to burn out.

How we tested

A bowl of kale, ready for future smoothies, next to the Cleanblend blender smoothie maker.

We judged each model on how well it performed everyday blending jobs such as making thick frozen smoothies and hot soups. We also wanted to see which blenders could emulsify eggs and oil into mayonnaise and pulverize nuts into a smooth butter. In each blender, we made a thick green smoothie packed with frozen bananas and berries, kale, and coconut water. We looked at each blender’s ability to create a consistent vortex without taxing the motor or needing additional liquid. Afterward, we tasted the smoothies to assess mouthfeel, and then we strained the remainder through a fine-mesh sieve to see how well the blenders had pulverized tough greens and berry seeds.

A blender can be a useful tool for making emulsified sauces such as mayonnaise, hollandaise, vinaigrettes, and Caesar dressing, so we tested each model’s ability to emulsify mayonnaise made with one egg yolk. Making a successful blender mayonnaise (or hollandaise or Caesar) hinges on the blades sitting low enough in the jar that they start whipping the egg yolk before you add a drop of oil.

To see how the motors handled dense purees, we processed raw peanuts into peanut butter. With our finalists, we made rounds of piña coladas to see how well they blended ice into slush.

Additionally, we noted how easy or difficult each blender was to clean, how noisy each model was, whether any of them produced a burning smell while the motor ran, whether the jars were difficult to attach to the bases, and how easy the interfaces were to use.

Our pick: Vitamix 5200

The Vitamix 5200 shown on a kitchen counter.

The Vitamix 5200 offers the best performance you can get in a home blender. This model has been one of our favorite blenders since 2014, and it’s the classic Vitamix that has remained the standard for pro chefs and blender enthusiasts. It consistently performed at the top of the pack in our tests, and it came recommended to us by multiple experts because it powerfully purees and pulverizes food more reliably, thoroughly, and elegantly than most blenders.

The Vitamix 5200 did not make the absolute smoothest smoothies of all the blenders we tested—that prize went to the Blendtec and Cleanblend machines. But when it came to consistent and graceful performance, the Vitamix won every time. This model was the only blender we tested that smoothly blended peanuts and almonds into butter. And whereas other blenders, such as the Blendtec, Cleanblend, and Oster, spit bits of mayo up the sides of the jar and out the lid’s center hole, the Vitamix kept the mixture smoothly and evenly moving around the base of the blade.

We found Vitamix’s variable-speed dial to have the best range among the blenders we tried. Its low is really low, and the blender produces a noticeable shift as you advance through each number. In our tests, this range of speeds made the Vitamix the best blender for hot liquids: You can start blending at a lazy swirl and slowly increase the speed so that the hot liquid is less likely to shoot up toward the lid and risk a volcanic, trip-to-the-burn-unit situation. In comparison, the Cleanblend has a forceful start on the lowest setting, which increases the chances of a painful eruption when you’re blending hot soups. The same goes for the Blendtec Designer 675, which in our tests was so powerful that the soup setting created a cyclone in a jar.

The Vitamix’s tamper is essential for breaking up air pockets and pushing ingredients down toward the blade while the machine is running. When using models without a tamper, we often needed to stop the blender to burst air pockets or scrape ingredients down the sides of the jar with a spatula. In some cases, we also had to add more water to the smoothie to get all the ingredients to move around the blades without the help of a tamper. For all these reasons, blending in the Vitamix with a tamper took about half the time as it took in the Blendtec with no included tamper. By keeping the ingredients moving, we were able to whip up a smoothie in about 30 seconds.

The speed controls and switches on the Vitamix 5200 blender.

The Vitamix’s Tritan-plastic jar feels sturdier than those of the other blenders we recommend, and the grippy handle is comfortable to hold. We also found the tall, narrow, tapered shape of the jar to be ideal for creating a strong vortex that pulled ingredients down toward the blade. That feature helped the Vitamix blend more efficiently than the Oster, with its wider jar, and the result was vastly superior to what we got from the wide, blocky jar of the Blendtec. Like the jars of most other high-powered blenders, the jar of the Vitamix (which has the blade attached) is very easy to clean: After you make a smoothie or something similar, you should find it sufficient to just pour in a bit of hot water, add a couple of drops of dish soap, blend for 30 seconds or so, and then rinse out the jar.

No high-powered blender we tested could be described as quiet, but we found the noise from the Vitamix to be much less offensive than the high-pitched whine of the Blendtec, and it was quieter than the roar of our runner-up, the Oster Versa.

Should its motor overheat, the Vitamix is equipped with an automatic shutoff feature to keep it from burning out. In our experience, the Vitamix should be able to handle a lot before it gets to that point, but if your Vitamix does shut off, it’s best to let the machine rest for an hour before you try to use it again.

One thing that softens the blow of spending more than $400 on a Vitamix is the comfort of knowing that it’s backed by a seven-year warranty. We called Vitamix’s customer service and learned that the approximate time between filing a claim and receiving your blender back in working order (or a certified refurb) is six to 10 days. For an additional fee, you can buy a three-year extended warranty for the 5200. If you purchase a new Vitamix from the company’s site or from a certified third-party retailer, such as Amazon, you have 30 days from the date of purchase to buy the extended warranty directly from Vitamix for $75. After 30 days have passed, you can purchase the extended warranty up until the original one expires for around $120.

You can save some money on a Vitamix if you opt for a certified-refurbished model. Jonathan Cochran of Blender Dude highly recommends them. “My pick for ‘best bang for the buck’ continues to be the Certified Refurbished (Blendtec) and Certified Reconditioned (Vitamix) models. I have personally inspected hundreds of each, and for all intents and purposes they are indistinguishable from the new models at a significantly reduced price point,” he told us. A certified reconditioned Vitamix comes with a five-year warranty, with the option to extend coverage three more years for an additional $75.

Long-term test notes

We used the same Vitamix 5200 in our test kitchen for five years with nothing but excellent results. It finally did burn out, but only after we put it through strenuous use over the course of many tests for both this guide and others. Still, it easily outlasted the Oster, and it made many more (and better) batches of nut butter and extra-thick smoothies before we pushed it to its limit. Since our Vitamix was still under warranty when it burned out, we contacted customer service, and the representatives promptly replaced it.

I’ve also used a Vitamix at home for years, and it’s still my favorite household blender, period. I long-term tested the runner-up, the Oster, for six months and noticed some glaring differences: The Vitamix can handle more without its motor straining, and the Vitamix’s tamper is much better than the Oster’s, which is really hard to get down in there.

Over the years, other Wirecutter staffers have expressed love for their Vitamix blenders. Former special projects editor Ganda Suthivarakom, who had used hers since 2015 without issue, said: “I love that I can make a lot of vegan recipes for cashew creams without having to soak the nuts beforehand.” Senior staff writer Chris Heinonen, who has owned his Vitamix since 2018, guesses that he has “used it more than all my blenders in the past combined.” The only minor complaint we’ve heard is from senior editor Kalee Thompson, who notes: “It’s so tall, it doesn’t fit under the upper shelves over my counters ... so I’m less inclined to leave it out, and once it’s away, I don’t use it as much.” That said, others have told us how much they appreciate the Vitamix’s large capacity.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

We know that for many people, the biggest issue with the Vitamix 5200 is its steep price. At around $400 or so, it’s at least twice the price of our runner-up, the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender. In the past, we’ve even made the Oster our top pick because of its comparatively affordable price. But after years of testing the Vitamix and using it in our test kitchen, we think it’s truly worth the investment. It’s more durable and all-around more effective than any other blender we’ve found, and if you plan on using a blender regularly, it will make your life a lot easier. Plus, consider the cost of buying a smoothie rather than making it at home: A morning smoothie can run from about $5 to $13, so in two to four months you will have paid the same amount as for a 5200. A Vitamix, by contrast, will last you at least seven years (and it makes a lot more than smoothies).

At more than 20 inches tall, the Vitamix 5200 is a big appliance—too big to fit under some kitchen cabinets. But none of the other high-powered blenders we tested were much smaller. Though the Oster is a couple of inches shorter, it also has a beefier base. If size is an issue for you, Vitamix makes other lines of blenders (as mentioned below) that have a shorter profile. But we’ve found that the tall, narrow shape of the 5200’s blending jar is one of the components that help this machine create such an effective vortex.

Finally, the Vitamix 5200 doesn’t come with any presets, just a variable-speed dial. But even though it’s nice to be able to press a button and have your blender run through a smoothie-making program, it’s not really essential. You’ll probably stick close to your blender anyway in order to use the tamper to get things moving, and it’s not hard to adjust the dial if you feel the need to. With the Vitamix it’s also easy to get good results without any presets.

What about other Vitamix models?

The 5200 isn’t the only blender in Vitamix’s selection—if you want the blending power of the 5200 but strongly prefer presets, or if you need a shorter jar that will fit your space, consider looking into other models. (If you want a good breakdown of the different Vitamix models, Jonathan Cochran of Blender Dude compares them.)

That said, the original 5200 remains our favorite because every new blender from Vitamix comes with a squat jar that doesn’t blend small amounts as well as the 5200’s tall and tapered pitcher. We tested the 5300, for example, and found that the base of its short jar was too wide to develop and maintain a vortex for making, say, a thick smoothie for one or two people. Check out the Competition section for more detailed testing notes on the 5300.

We haven’t tested any models from the new Vitamix Ascent Series, but we suspect we’d have the same issue with the shorter, squatter jars. According to owner reviews, the Ascent blenders seem to suffer from some other problems, too, such as a complicated adapter for the personal blending cup and a sensor that shuts off the machine if it detects that the mixture in the jar is too thick. Our favorite feature of the 5200 is its ability to blend absurdly thick concoctions!

Runner-up: Oster Versa Pro Series Blender

Our runner-up pick the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender on a kitchen counter.

We don’t think you can beat the value of the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender. It isn’t quite as powerful as the Vitamix 5200, but it is about half the price, and it beat out most of the other blenders in its price range at making silky smoothies, purees, and blended cocktails. It has one of the best combinations of variable and preset speeds we’ve found, and its settings are more intuitive to use than those on other models we’ve tried. It also offers features, such as a tamper and overheating protection, that are usually available only on more expensive blenders. We don’t think the Oster is as durable as the Vitamix (ours burned out after two and a half years). But it does come with a seven-year warranty, and it’s a great option if you’re not ready to spring for the Vitamix.

The Oster passed almost every challenge we threw at it. And although it failed to achieve the absolute smoothest drink textures compared with the Blendtec or the Cleanblend—it left whole raspberry seeds in smoothies and made a slightly grainy piña colada—its smoothies were still much smoother than any of the results from lower-priced blenders. As long as the Oster had about 2 cups of nuts to work with, it made a decent nut butter (albeit one that was slightly crunchier than the batch we made in the Vitamix). And it whipped up a velvety puree. The only thing the Oster really struggled to do was make mayonnaise; we were able to make an emulsification only once out of four tries.

We found the Oster easier to control than other blenders of a similar price, thanks to its wide range of speeds. Though not as varied as those on the Vitamix, the speeds on the Oster are far more diverse than those on the Cleanblend, which, despite its variable-speed dial, seems to have only two settings: high and higher. In comparison, the Oster’s low speed is sane enough that you can start pureeing a batch of soup without having hot liquid shoot up the sides of the jar (a problem with the Cleanblend).

A smoothie made by the Oster being tested for smoothness by running it through a mesh strainer.

The Oster is the only one of our blender picks to have both manual speed controls and preset programs for soup, dip, and smoothies. This makes it more versatile than the more expensive entry-level models from Vitamix and Blendtec, which have only variable or preset speeds, respectively. To get presets with a Vitamix, or a variable-speed “touch slider” with a Blendtec model, you need to spend even more.

The tamper that comes with the Oster is a little too short and oddly shaped. In contrast to the smooth cylindrical tampers of the Vitamix and Cleanblend models, the Oster’s tamper has three flat pieces of plastic that meet in the middle. But the design works sufficiently to burst air bubbles and help move things like peanuts around the blades, so it’s better than no tamper at all.

This Oster model, like other high-performance blenders, is a beefy machine. The base takes up 8 by 9 inches of counter space. But at 17½ inches tall to the top of the lid, the Oster will fit better on a counter under most kitchen cabinets than the Vitamix or the Cleanblend, both of which are more than 19 inches tall.

Also, like all the other high-powered blenders we tested, the Oster gets loud when you turn the motor up all the way—much louder than the Vitamix but not as annoying or high-pitched as the Blendtec. For now, this is just the way it is with high-performance blenders.

Like the Vitamix, the Oster shuts off if the motor is in danger of overheating. If the Oster’s overload protection stops the motor, you should allow it to cool for 45 minutes and press the reset button on the bottom of the base before you run the blender again. This procedure reduces the risk of permanent motor burnout.

The Oster Versa passed almost every challenge we threw at it.

Should it burn out, the Oster comes with a limited seven-year warranty that covers “defects in material and workmanship,” including the motor and the Tritan jar. That policy is about the same as the coverage from Blendtec and Vitamix, which offer eight- and seven-year warranties, respectively, on their models. In our experience, Oster’s customer service is courteous and quickly addresses any issues with a blender while it’s under warranty.

But if you’re thinking that the Oster Versa will deliver the longevity and performance of a Vitamix 5200 at a fraction of the cost, think again. The Oster model’s biggest flaw is its durability: We found through personal experience that the Versa can burn out after two to three years of moderate to frequent use (see our long-term test notes for this model below). We’ve seen some reviews on Amazon (as well as comments from our readers) that mention the same problem. But Oster honors its seven-year warranty and is quick to send a replacement (we got ours in about a week). Although it took three attempts for us to get through to customer service by phone during the busy holiday shopping season, we’re assuming that hiccup was due to the unusually high call volume that occurs at that time of year.

The blending jar, lid, and controls on the Oster also feel cheaper compared with what you get on the Vitamix. But given that this blender is typically almost $250 less, we’re comfortable with the lower-quality hardware.

Long-term test notes

For three years, we used the Versa twice a week on average to make smoothies and soup, and it never quit on us during that time—although we occasionally detected a faint burning smell from the motor while we were blending thick smoothies. But the motor permanently died when we formally tested the three-year-old Versa again for our 2017 update: One minute into our blending the nut butter, the overload protection cut the motor. We should’ve let the motor rest for 45 minutes before restarting, but we let it cool for only 10 minutes before our second attempt—and that’s when the motor burned out completely. However, our blender was still under warranty, and Oster quickly sent a replacement.

Wirecutter’s audience development manager, Erin Price, uses the Oster Versa and so far has no complaints. She told us: “I’ve had the Oster Versa since 2016, and it’s still going strong (though it sat in storage for one of those years). I mostly use it for smoothies, and it handles ice and greens so well.”

Also great: Cleanblend Blender

A Cleanblend Blender on a counter next to smoothie ingredients that are on a cutting board.

If you’re willing to take a chance on a shorter warranty from a newer company, the 1,800-watt Cleanblend Blender costs about the same as the Oster Versa and produces finer purees. In our tests, it blended silkier smoothies and piña coladas than many blenders that cost more than twice as much. This model comes with a durable Tritan-plastic jar and a tamper for you to help move thick mixtures while it’s blending. The Cleanblend doesn’t have any preset buttons, and its variable speeds aren’t as nuanced as those of the Vitamix, but its interface is simple and intuitive to use. Judging from our long-term testing, the Cleanblend’s motor is durable and able to handle tough jobs like nut butter better than the Oster. It’s also backed by a complete five-year warranty.

The Cleanblend made some of the smoothest smoothies in our tests, performing better than the Oster and even the Vitamix in that regard. When we strained the Cleanblend’s kale and berry smoothie, barely any raspberry seeds remained in our fine-mesh sieve; the only blender that did better was the Blendtec. The Cleanblend also came in second, behind the Blendtec, in blending a silky-smooth piña colada. We’re talking restaurant-worthy blended drinks here.

For blending other things, the Cleanblend has a few limitations. It doesn’t have as wide a range of speeds as the Oster or the Vitamix, and it kicks into high gear even at the 1 setting, which in our soup test sent hot liquid shooting up to the lid. Although the Cleanblend was better at making mayonnaise than the Oster, this model’s motor also seemed to produce a lot of heat; its mayo was noticeably warm. Like our other picks (except the KitchenAid, our budget pick), the Cleanblend comes with a tamper, but the bat is a little short. Although it works fine for most tasks, don’t attempt to make nut butter from fewer than 2 cups of nuts, because the shorter tamper won’t reach the mixture once the nuts are finely ground.

The Cleanblend made some of the smoothest smoothies in our tests.

Over our long-term testing, the Cleanblend’s motor has seemed more durable than the Oster’s, though we’re not sure it’s a match for the motor of the time-tested Vitamix. In our 2017 testing, our four-year-old Cleanblend and Vitamix blenders both powered through two rounds of nut butter without quitting. The same test fried our three-year-old Oster. That said, Oster offers a seven-year warranty on the Versa Pro Series Blender, but Cleanblend offers only a five-year total warranty.

For an extra $75, you can extend the warranty on your Cleanblend Blender to a total of 10 years. This is a great value when you consider that the blender, including the decade of coverage, still costs about $200 less than a Vitamix. If you’re looking for the all-around great performance of a Vitamix for less than half the cost, you won’t find that here (or anywhere else for that matter), but the Cleanblend is a good value when you compare the numbers.

However, Cleanblend’s customer service is reachable only by email or a form on its website, and that might not inspire confidence in some people. Both Vitamix and Oster have a customer service phone number that connects you to a representative. Even though the Cleanblend seems more durable than the Oster, Cleanblend is such a new company that we’re not yet confident in its blender’s long-term reliability.

The Cleanblend’s base takes up 9½ by 8 inches of counter space, about the same as our other high-performance picks (our budget pick, the KitchenAid, is smaller). And at 19 inches high to the top of the lid, the Cleanblend is taller than the Oster, but it has just slightly more clearance under most kitchen cabinets than the Vitamix (which measures closer to 20 inches). Also, like all of the other high-performance blenders we tested, the Cleanblend is loud. But compared with the Ninja Chef’s thunderous roar and the Blendtec’s high-pitched whine, the Cleanblend’s sound is far easier on the ears.

Long-term test notes

Senior staff writer Michael Sullivan has used an older version of the Cleanblend at home for about four years and says he has never had an issue with it. He pulls it out about six times a month to make smoothies, sauces, soup, or occasionally emulsifications like mayonnaise. He has even crushed ice in it a few times, and he says that so far it has never stalled out.

Sabrina Imbler, a Wirecutter staff writer at the time of our tests, used the Cleanblend in her home for more than a year. She used it three to four times a week and never experienced stalling or burnout. She told us: “[My] only minor complaint is that sometimes the blender rattles a bit on top of the base, which makes me a little wary, but otherwise it’s great. I only use it for smoothies and mixed drinks, never any kind of nuts, but it pulverizes ice pretty quick. It’s also the perfect size for two smoothies. I tend to use the middle range of speeds, as I rarely need the highest, and the lowest is less effective for my needs. And I really like that it’s a dial as opposed to number buttons—easier to [crank] up if my stuff isn’t blending fast.”

Budget pick: KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender

A KitchenAid K150 blender shown filled with a pineapple smoothie on a kitchen counter.

If you blend only the occasional smoothie, daiquiri, or soup, you don’t need an expensive high-powered blender. The KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender will serve your needs. Offering a low profile and a 48-ounce blending jar, this blender is the most compact of all our picks. In our tests, the K150 proved adequate at blending thick smoothies, but not without a couple of stops and starts or our having to add a little more liquid to get a consistent vortex going. It can’t puree tough berry seeds as our top pick can, nor can it produce such velvety-smooth frozen drinks. However, the K150 has a mighty motor for the price and will handle most simple blending tasks.

The KitchenAid K150 offers three speeds plus a pulse setting for crushing ice. For frozen drinks and smoothies, the second speed seems to be the sweet spot, as that’s where we encountered the fewest air pockets. As with most blenders at this price, you need to add more liquid to get smoothies and frozen drinks to blend with a continuous vortex; otherwise, you need to stop it a couple of times to break up air pockets. Overall, we were satisfied with the drinks we made in the K150. The piña colada was a little icy but not offensive, and the smoothie was what we’d expect from a good $100 blender: very drinkable, with whole berry seeds and tiny flecks of kale.

When you turn the K150 on, the blades automatically start slow and ramp up to the set speed, a feature that’s great for safely blending hot liquids like pureed soups. But it’s still important that you take precautions when blending hot foods, such as starting on low speed and securing the lid with a folded dish towel.

We were pleasantly surprised that the K150 let us make a small batch of mayonnaise from one egg yolk and half a cup of oil. We didn’t think the jar’s wide square base and relatively short blade span would allow us to emulsify such a small volume.

As its name indicates, the KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender does crush ice. We’re not talking professional-grade fluffy shaved ice, but it’ll do the trick if you want to make a few snow cones on a hot summer day.

The K150 is lightweight and compact—perfect for people who want to store their blender in a cabinet. It also has a low profile (15 inches) that allows it to fit easily in the standard clearance between kitchen countertops and upper cabinets (18 inches). But the pitcher is on the small side at 48 ounces, and it lacks the comfy rubber-clad handle on our other picks.

As an alternative to buying this blender as is (base, 48-ounce jar, and lid), you can get it bundled with two personal blending cups for around $50 more. We haven’t tested the personal blending cups yet, but we’ll give them a try soon and report back. KitchenAid also plans to release a version of the K150 with a glass blending jar, though we prefer plastic blender jars for their durability.

At this writing the K150 seems to have some stock issues post–Black Friday shopping. We’re told that stock should be replenished some time in January 2021 in a broader range of colors. The KitchenAid K150 comes with a one-year warranty that excludes accidents, drops, misuse, and abuse.

Long-term test notes

Wirecutter staff writer Sarah Bogdan has the K150, and she and her roommate use it a few times a month for smoothies. She says that it blends fruits just fine, but she wishes that it got a finer blend with the vegetables she adds like kale and spinach. However, her roommate who sticks to peanut butter, bananas, and protein powder has no issues with it. It’s been a little difficult to clean, but she also realizes that’s true of any full-size blender.

Blender care and maintenance

If you find that your blender is having a difficult time processing ingredients, don’t be afraid to be aggressive (within reason) with the tamper to get the mixture moving around the blades. Also, make sure the blender jar is at least 25% full. Although high speeds will help process smoother mixtures, a lower speed (PDF) may also help ingredients start circulating if they just aren’t moving. When you’re following a recipe, it’s also good to add ingredients in the order listed; blender recipe books tend to be specific with the order (Vitamix, for example, generally lists ice as the last ingredient).

To limit the risk of hot liquids shooting out the top of a blending jar, always start on a low setting and slowly increase the speed (in general, presets do this automatically). Never fill the jar past the hot-liquid fill line. And for good measure, to limit the risk of the lid popping off, place a dish towel over the lid, with your hand firmly holding the lid down, while you blend.

Hand wash the blending jar with warm, soapy water rather than running it through the dishwasher. This will help extend the life of the jar. In our own testing, we found that the best way to clean a blender jar is to use a bottle brush or a scrub brush; processing water and a little soap in the blender jar will help loosen up tough ingredients such as peanut butter, and the brush should do the rest.

The competition

Compared with our top pick, the Vitamix 5200, the Vitamix 5300 has the same 64-ounce capacity and speed-control dial, but it lacks the ultra-high-speed switch available on the 5200. It has a slightly higher peak horsepower, but any extra power is negated by the shape of the jar. In testing, we found that the 5300’s relatively squat jar failed to maintain a vortex as well as the 5200’s narrow, tapered one. Also, for smaller volumes—2 cups or less—the 5300’s tamper didn’t reach down quite far enough to burst air pockets. We had to add more liquid to thicker mixtures, such as date puree and hummus, because the tamper wasn’t cutting it.

The Vitamix Explorian E320, available at Costco, is 99% identical to the 5300. A Vitamix customer service representative told us that the two blenders had the same motor base, jar, tamper, and functionality. The main difference between the blenders is that the 5300 has a small on/off switch located just below the control panel. On top of that, the E320 is available only as part of a package with two personal cups and an adapter.

Vitamix added the Explorian Series E310 variable-speed blender to its lineup in 2017. We chose not to test this model because we didn’t think it was a good value. Although it’s typically three-quarters the price of the Vitamix 5200, the cost difference is directly proportional to the E310’s smaller blending jar (48 ounces versus 64 ounces) and shorter warranty (five versus seven years). On the E310, Vitamix also replaced the switch that flips the machine from variable speed to high power with a pulse switch, thus eliminating the option for one-touch high-power blending. If you have limited storage space in your kitchen, you might like the E310 for its shorter height (about 17 inches tall, compared with the Vitamix 5200, which is about 20 inches tall). But if you’re going to shell out the cash for a Vitamix blender, we still think spending a little more on the 5200 is the best choice.

We bid a somber adieu to two near-identical former budget picks from KitchenAid: the 5-Speed Classic blender (still available refurbished as of May 2021) and the Diamond 5-Speed blender. The 5-Speed Classic was our budget pick for nearly five years before KitchenAid discontinued it and replaced it with the Diamond 5-Speed in 2019. In 2020, the company replaced the Diamond 5-Speed with the K150, our current budget pick. Buying the 5-Speed Classic refurbished isn’t a bad option if you want to save a little money, but keep in mind that it only comes with a 6-month warranty.

The KitchenAid K400 blender is more powerful than the KitchenAid K150 (our budget pick) but not enough to warrant its $150-plus price jump. And in our tests the K400 wasn’t nearly as good at blending fibrous kale as the less expensive Oster and Cleanblend blenders.

The KitchenAid Pro Line Series Blender is expensive, and it’s also the heaviest blender we’ve tested (22 pounds). In our tests it blended silky-smooth textures, though not quite as easily as the Vitamix 5200, but it didn’t do well at emulsification. While its performance intrigued us, after a year of long-term testing this model, we found that it delivered results similar to those of the Vitamix. And the heft and size of this KitchenAid model make it a difficult-to-move space hog.

Will the Blendtec Designer 675 blend? Yes, but not as well as our top picks. Despite Blendtec’s clever (if at times mildly sinister) video marketing campaign of blending everything from rake handles to iPhones, we’ve found its blenders wanting (we also tested the Total model in 2012). Although in our tests the Designer 675 killed it in making smoothies and blended drinks, its lack of a tamper limits its usefulness. It failed to make peanut butter (a tamper would have helped), and the preset speed for soup was frightening, with hot liquid flying wildly around the jar. We do think this particular model is quite beautiful, with a sleek black, illuminated base. It’s a great blender if you want something that looks slick on your counter and can make amazingly smooth mixed drinks and smoothies. But we think a blender that’s this expensive should perform well at more than just those two tasks. For more on how the Blendtec stacks up against the Vitamix 5200, read our article about testing the two blenders head-to-head.

We tested the Blendtec Total Blender for our 2012 review but found that it couldn’t compete with the Vitamix we tested at the time. The lid felt flimsy, and this model’s panel controls seemed cheap.

The Breville Super Q is a performance blender that’s packed with bells and whistles. In our tests, with its squat jar and powerful motor, the Super Q performed a lot like the Blendtec Designer 675, throwing smoothie up the sides and into the lid. At one point, the Breville shot bits of a smoothie in my face when I opened the cap to add more liquid. The Super Q pulverizes tough foods, but the Vitamix also does that for less money—and with less drama inside the jar. The Super Q also generated a lot of heat when we made peanut butter—so much that we had to stop the test early when we noticed steam coming out of the jar. Although the Super Q blended the silkiest piña coladas and came with lots of extra goodies (a 68-ounce jar, a personal blending jar, preset blending programs, and a vacuum attachment that’s supposed to slow the oxidation of raw foods), we don’t think it’s worth the $100-plus over the Vitamix’s price, especially since most of those goodies would just clutter your cabinets.

In our tests, the Cuisinart CBT-1500 Hurricane struggled to process foods. Blending thick smoothies and peanut butter required adding more liquid, a lot of starting and stopping, and banging the jar on the counter. It did make mayonnaise on the first try, though, unlike the more powerful Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro. But without the Turbo button of the Hurricane Pro (more on that below), this model is just another middle-of-the-road blender.

The Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro performed similarly to the Cuisinart CBT-1500 Hurricane, except it didn’t make mayonnaise as well (we achieved emulsification on the third try only). We did find the Turbo button useful for creating a fine puree. But again, without a tamper to burst air pockets, this blender needed a lot of tending to produce uniform, smooth purees.

The Ninja Chef CT800 1,500-watt blender is the first high-performance model from this company that doesn’t have sets of blades throughout the jar. Instead, the Ninja Chef’s blades sit in the base of the jar, as in normal blenders. This model also performed better than its predecessors. But it was extremely loud, and our top picks—the Vitamix, the Oster, and the Cleanblend—still blended silkier smoothies in our tests.

For the price, the Ninja Master Prep Professional is a decent blender, but we don’t think it compares to any of our other picks. It did a surprisingly good job of making smoothies, mixing bean spread, and blending margaritas, but the design is terrible for making mayonnaise (the motor is top-mounted, so you can’t drizzle anything into the jar). The stacked blades are also dangerously sharp, making them difficult to clean. The Ninja Master Prep Professional comes with three blending jars in various sizes; we thought that it added up to too many parts and that they would just end up cluttering our cupboards. Overall, the machine felt really cheap.

The Ninja Professional Blender 1000 didn’t perform well. The green smoothies we made in this blender had a weird, confetti-like texture. And the mayo this model made was especially loose, which meant that it was whipping in too much air. Every time we ran this Ninja blender, we detected a strong, burning-motor smell. The jar was hard to get on the base, and the lid was tricky to clamp on. Also, the base was big, clunky, and cheap feeling.

The Instant Pot Ace 60 Cooking Blender is unique in that it has a heating element in its base, so it can both cook and puree foods (some high-powered blenders also claim to “cook” soup, but they do so only with friction). After performing extensive testing, we found that this seemingly nifty feature was impractical. We made a decent broccoli cheese soup and a smooth butternut squash puree, but we had to blend each one for longer than the programmed setting to get a creamy texture. And we were disappointed to discover that we couldn’t adjust the temperature or sauté in the machine, since the heating element doesn’t start if it doesn’t detect liquid in the jar. As such, the Ace doesn’t produce the same nuanced flavors that you’d get if you started with a little caramelization. The heating element also introduces another possible point of failure into a type of appliance that is already prone to burning out.

The Ace whipped up smooth peanut butter and did a slightly better job of pulverizing ice cubes and tough kale leaves than most of the budget-level blenders we’ve tested. But it’s huge and loud, and its glass jar is heavier and less durable than the Tritan plastic jars of our picks. The jar’s wide base also makes it difficult for the Ace to form a powerful vortex (instead flinging ingredients all over the jar).

The 1,800-watt Hamilton Beach Professional Blender performed well in our tests. When we used the manual speeds, the blender’s digital readout showed a countdown timer, which was helpful because the instruction manual advised against continuously running the motor for more than two minutes. But the preprogrammed settings didn’t effectively keep the mixture moving when air pockets occurred. In addition, the on/off buttons are angled upward at the top of the base and thus susceptible to food and grime buildup over time.

Источник: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-blender/

Common Washing Machine Problems

If you have a problem with your washing machine we'll help you identify the fault and give you advice on how to repair it.

 

Before diving into diagnosing your specific fault, it's worth taking a minute to study the anatomy of a washing machine and familiarise yourself with the inner components and their location; it will help fault finding and repair.

For example, an unusual noise coming from the lower right area of the washing machine would suggest that something is stuck in the pump filter; perhaps a foreign object such as a coin is catching on the pump implellor.  A leak from the back right hand corner of your washing machine could mean a problem with the waste hose, and would be a good place to start looking.

Of course not all washing machines are put together in exactly the same way, but the laws of physics and mechanical engineering means that they all follow a similar theme.

The pump will always be found at the bottom of the machine because they are gravity fed by design.  On a belt driven washing machine (99% of all washing machines) the belt and pulley will be located at the rear of the tub.  And, Just below, you will find the motor, that drives the drum via the belt.  Any electronics will tend to be up above the water line for obvious reasons.  Once you begin to look at the inner workings of a washing machine it will quickly become logical why components have been fitted where they are!


This fault can leave you wondering if your washing machine is beyond economical repair; when you turn your washing machine on it does nothing!

More often than not the problem is easily fixed at no cost, or by replacing an inexpensive part.

Check the power to the washing machine

Don't skip this part ...

Remember that the power starts at the consumer unit (fuse box); make sure that a fuse hasn't tripped.

Next, check the plug socket; the best way to confirm that there isn't a fault with the plug socket is to plug another electrical appliance such as the kettle to see if it boils as it should.

If all is ok with the consumer unit and the socket next you now need to confirm the wiring to the plug looks good and there are no kinks or breaks in the wire, and check that the fuse in the plug is ok.

Check the washing machine door

Again, often overlooked but it's a simple mistake to make.  Check your washing machine door is closed and closed properly.  All washing machines have what's known as a door interlock.  It is designed to stop the door from being opened when the machine is switched on, and unless the door of your washing machine is fully closed and latched, it won’t start.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to turn on

Faulty Door Interlock (most likely fault)

As mentioned above, washing machines won’t start if the door isn’t properly locked (or isn’t registered by the machine as correctly locked). As a result, a faulty door interlock could prevent the machine from starting. Watch the following video for a step by step guide on:

How To Replace A Faulty Door Interlock?

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace your faulty door interlock

Faulty On/Off Switch (relatively rare fault)

It is possible that the on/off switch is faulty and will need replacing.

Faulty Module Circuit Board (relatively rare fault)

A faulty module circuit board could prevent your washing machine from turning on – in this case; you will need to get it professionally repaired.  This is the least likely component to fail, but they do fail from time to time.

Faulty Suppressor (least likely fault)

The interference suppressor is normally situated internally at the point where the power lead enters the washing machine.  It is designed to eliminate interference between electrical items.  If this 'blows' then your washing machine will not work at all.


This fault can appear similar to that in the above section, 'Why won't my washing machine turn on'.  With this fault, power will be getting to the valves, but water won't be entering the washing machine.

Check the washing machine inlet hose/s

By far the most common cause of a washing machine not filling is kinked inlet hoses.  You will need to gain access to the rear of the washing machine and check that the hoses aren't trapped or kinked.

Check the water taps (plumbing)

With access to the rear of the washing machine, you can now check that the water taps are turned on.  If you suspect a problem with your water supply, turn off the water taps, and disconnect the inlet hoses from the washing machine.  Place the inlet hoses in a bucket and then turn on the water taps.  You will want to see water to flow out under pressure to confirm that the water supply is ok.

Check washing machine inlet valve filters

If your washing machine is filling, but very slowly, check the inlet valve filters aren't clogged with debris.  Turn off the water taps, disconnect the hose/s from the washing machine, and the valve filters will be visible.  They can be removed with a pair of long nose pliers and cleaned if necessary.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to fill

Faulty Inlet Hose (Most likely fault)

If you identify an inlet hose to be kinked, then it will most likely need to be replaced.  If you don't, it will quickly become kinked again once the washing machine is back in position.

Faulty Inlet Valves (Likely fault)

Check at the back of the machine where the inlet hose screws on to the inlet valve.  If the water supply is ok and you can hear a humming noise from the water inlet valve/s then it is likely they are faulty and will need replacing.

How To Replace A Faulty Inlet Valve?

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace a washing machine inlet valve


This fault can be disastrous and requires immediate attention.  If you are lucky you will catch it early; you will come to load your washing machine with clothes and notice that the drum has water in it.  The problem will lie with the washing machine inlet valve, and you should replace it ASAP.  While waiting for the replacement part ensure that you turn the taps off when the washing machine is not in use.

You'll probably first notice this fault when you return to your washing machine to remove a load of washing and the clothes inside are soaking wet.  The cause is simple; the washing machine has completed it's program without spinning the clothes at the end.

Check the load

First, you should check the size of the load that is in the washing machine.  Too little clothes in a washing machine can be just as problematic as too many.  There needs to be just the right amount of clothes so that when the washing machine spins, they are evenly distributed around the drum ensuring balance.  The control module will detect a drum that is out of balance, and the washing machine will stop to prevent any damage occurring. Just adjust the size of your load and select a spin cycle again.  If your washing machine spins without any problem, then it was 'out of balance' that caused the problem.

Check the washing machine belt

It is possible that the washing machine belt has worked its way off the motor/pully.  A simple check is to open the door and turn the drum with your hand.  If the drum rotates VERY freely without any resistance, then it is likely that the belt has become detached.
If you can feel some resistance, which is the belt turning the motor, then the belt is still correct in place

Check the wash cycle

Having followed the steps above it is now likely that the fault isn't just affecting the spin cycle.  Select your regular wash cycle and switch on the machine.  It should fill up with water, and the drum should eventually start turning back and forth washing machine the clothes.  If the drum sits idle, then the fault will likely be the motor carbon brushes, the motor, or the motor control module.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to turn or spin

Broken or snapped belt (Most likely)

As mentioned above, if the washing machine drum rotates by hand VERY freely then the belt is likely to be the cause of the problem.

How to replace the belt on a washing machine.

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace the belt on a washing machine.

Faulty or worn washing machine carbon brushes

Carbon brushes are in constant contact with the moving part of the motor, so they get worn down over time and will eventually need replacing.

How to replace carbon brushes on a washing machine

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace carbon brushes on a washing machine.

Faulty motor control module (least likely)

A defective module circuit board can prevent the motor from turning the drum.  If suspected then you should seek the services of a trained appliance repair specialist.

Faulty motor (uncommon)

Faults with the motor are uncommon, however they do occur.  If suspected then you should seek the services of a trained appliance repair specialist.


A washing machine that has sprung a leak is a fault that ranges in severity, from a minor dribble to an all-out flood.  Usually, leaks can be fixed yourself at little or no cost; you just need to have a methodical approach to finding the source.

Start looking on the outside of the washing machine

Before you start removing the washing machine lid and rear panel first take some time to see if there are signs of water on the outside of the washing machine.

Check the water inlet taps and hoses

The area to start your investigation is at the rear of the washing machine where the water inlet hoses are attached.  With the washing machine running check for water at each end of the inlet hoses.

Washing machine waste pipe blocked?

A common problem in hard water areas where a build-up of limescale can cause blockages in your waste pipe restricting the flow of water to the drain.  Water will back up and overflow the waste pipe causing flooding.  Check the wall area around the waste pipe for signs of water.

Check the soap dispenser

A build-up of powder detergent in the hose that runs from the soap dispenser to the tub will eventually cause a blockage and water would back up and flood from the soap dispenser drawer.

Check the washing machine door

A common area for leaks is the washing machine door.  If it appears that water is coming from the door, check the door seal for signs of damage or perishing.

Check the door glass; a build-up of limescale on the glass will mean that the door isn’t forming a seal causing water to escape.

Check the washing machine filter

If your washing machine has a removable filter, you will almost certainly find it at the front bottom of your washing machine.  Sometimes it can be hidden behind the plinth.  A damaged or perished filter seal will be enough to cause a leak in this area.

Leaks from inside the washing machine

Once you have ruled out the leak is coming from outside of the washing machine it will be necessary to investigate the internal hoses and components.  First, it is a good idea to try and understand the approximate location of the leak.  To do this, you can spread some newspaper or cardboard underneath the washing machine, and then turn it on.  The position of the water leak will now be visible and give you a good idea of where to investigate first.

Check the pump and associated hoses

Leaks from the washing machine pump are relatively rare. However, a build of limescale can cause hoses and seals to perish.

Check the internal hoses and plastic components

Any component that is rubber or plastic has the potential to break down and cause a leak.  You will typically see a tell-tale sign that water has leaked around an area.

Nowadays washing machine tubs are constructed of plastic, not metal, and it is not uncommon for a foreign object, such as a coin, to get caught up between the drum and the tub sheering part of the plastic moulding.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine to leak

Perished or damaged washing machine door seal

Washing machine door seals are liable to become damaged, or perish, over time.

How to replace a washing machine door seal

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace a washing machine door seal

Damaged filter or filter seal

Carbon brushes are in constant contact with the moving part of the motor, so they get worn down over time and will eventually need replacing.

How to replace or clean the filter on a washing machine

Watch our DIY repair video on how to clean and replace the filter on a washing machine

Damaged washing machine drain hose

The plastic drain hose can become damaged if kinked during the installation of the washing machine.  It has also been known for mice to chew a hole in the washing machine drain hose.

Damaged washing machine inlet hose

Failure of the water inlet hoses can occur.  The rubber 'O' seal found at both ends of the hose can also fail and cause leaks.

Damaged internal hoses

Any rubber hose inside the washing machine can fail over time.

Damage to plastic tubs

Can occur if a foreign object such as a coin passes through the washing machine during a cycle.


Whether it’s a grinding noise, a knocking noise, or an intermittent noise you will want to investigate and repair the problem sooner rather than later.  Leaving it can lead to a much bigger problem to fix.

Noise from your washing machine pump

Noise coming from the pump area of your washing machine will typically mean that a foreign object, such as a coin, will have passed through the system and be caught in the filter.  Most pumps fitted to washing machines in recent years are an integral part of the filter housing (note: some washing machines don’t have filters at all).  Small foreign objects can pass into the filter by slipping through the gap between the outer tub and the rotating drum. Items such as pebbles, coins and small screws or nails - to name a few.

These items can then pass from the filter into the pump chamber where the pump’s impeller will ‘whiz’ the object around the chamber making a loud rattling noise - think blender, putting a screw in the blender’s container would give a similar effect.

The pump’s impeller rotates at a tremendous speed to expel the water from your washing machine. Consequently, there is strain put on this small part. The impeller will also have to cope with pushing small pieces of debris out along with the water. Mostly, the impeller will deal with what it is expected to do, but on occasions, it may come loose and begin to make a noise and is likely to break away all together eventually.

Noise from the drum area of the washing machine

Grinding noise from the drum during the wash and spin cycles usually suggest that the drum bearings have worn.  To check, turn the drum back and forth; movement should be smooth and easy with very little resistance or noise.  If you can hear or feel grinding then this is confirmation that your washing machine bearings have indeed worn.

If you suspect the drum bearings to be a problem, another quick way to indicate this is to look at the floor below your washing machine. If you find a black or brown patch, then remove the back cover of your washing machine and inspect the area just below the centre of your drum pulley. If the same coloured marks are streaking down the rear of the outer tub, this indicates that the drum bearing seal has worn or perished letting water enter and destroy the bearings.

Drum Shaft

The rotating drum is held in its position by a component called a drum support shaft or drum support spider consisting of three metal alloy arms and a steel shaft which protrudes through the drum bearings enabling the drum to rotate.
The arms attach to the rear of the drum at the points where the baffles are in place. Looking through the door to the back of the drum, you will observe three pressed shapes radiating from the centre to each baffle point - that’s where you will find the drum support shaft.

These shafts do shear, and the impact is immediate, the consequent noise is quite alarming for the simple fact that it is so sudden.  Just inside the door opening, hold the tub down with your fingers at the 6 o’clock, rotate the drum, so a baffle is at 12 o’clock, then push up the drum to see if you can detect a spongy movement of the drum.

This movement may be evident for one or maybe two arms. Another indication is when the drum rotates you might observe an apparent misalignment between the rotating drum and the static outer tub.

Foreign body caught between drum and tub

Another noise that is not uncommon is a coin or some other foreign object that has found it’s way between the outer tub and the drum. The unusual sound will likely be heard during the spin cycle when water is being forced out of the clothes and whipping up the foreign object/s. Bra wires are a favourite! Over time they work their way out of the garment and fit comfortably through the holes in the drum. They will make a distinct tinny rattle as they scrape against the rotating drum.

Noise from the motor

Worn motor bearings while less likely are possible; they are more difficult to isolate for the untrained ear as the sound is distinct.

If there is noticeable wear of the motor bearings, then one can attempt to distinguish between these or drum bearing noise by removing the back panel and taking the belt off the motor/drum pulleys. Rotate the drum to see if any sound indicating worn bearings is detected, if not, now rotate motor pulley for any signs of noticeable wear and noise.

Miscellaneous washing machine noise

Loose tub weight:

If you hear your washing machine begin to knock and you also find grey dust appearing under or around your washing machine, stop using it immediately.
There are usually two counterweights inside your washing machine designed to help balance the tub/drum during use.  You will find one on top of the tub, and one on the lower front of the tub.
Damage to either counterweight can cause severe damage, the tub weights are hefty and if they become loose or cracked they will rip away from the tub during spin cycle usually destroying their brackets and rendering your machine beyond economic repair.

Transit bolts or packaging not removed

If your machine is new and it begins to vibrate excessively to the point of moving, then consider checking that you, or the person that installed the washing machine, have removed the transit bolts and any internal packaging.
Check underneath your machine as often large pieces of polystyrene are placed there as part of the packaging to protect the motor and can easily be overlooked during installation.

Possible faulty components that cause washing machine noise

Damaged pump

Damage to the washing machine pump by foreign objects such as coins is a common problem.

How to replace a washing machine pump

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace a washing machine pump

Worn washing machine drum bearings

Depending on use, washing machine bearings won't last forever.  In many modern washing machines drum bearings are now encased on sealed tubs and cannot be replaced.  In these cases the tub and drum would be replaced as one unit.

Damaged drum shaft spider

Although uncommon, drum shaft spiders do break down from time to time.

Worn motor

Noise because of a worn motor is a relatively uncommon fault.

Counterweights

Counterweights are constructed of concrete and can develope cracks due to vibration.


Firstly, don’t be tempted to force the door open!

Check if the washing machine is still full of water

If there is water in the drum, the washing machine door will remain locked.  Follow our step by step video guide to solving this problem:

Broken washing machine door handle

Broken door handles are a common fault.  If there is less resistance than usual when you pull or squeeze the handle to open the door, then the part of the door handle that moves the latch will have broken away.

Child lock engaged

Modern machines now have their wash programs selected electronically via a control module or power board depending on how the manufacturer describes the component.  More often they have a child lock function available to the user.  It is easy to select by mistake and is usually indicated by a lit ‘key’ symbol if your machine has a console display or a key symbol on your machine’s console panel with an indicator light adjacent to it. Refer to your instructions for your washing machine.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine door not to open

Broken door handle

Washing machine door handles are plastic and prone to wear and tear.

How to replace a washing machine door handle

Watch our DIY repair video on replacing the door handle on a washing machine

Faulty door interlock

The washing machine door interlock ensures that the door cannot be opened during a wash cycle.


Mouldy washing machine door seals are a bi-product of our attempt to reduce the carbon footprint, and rightly so!  If we can save the world from human destruction, who cares about a smelly, mouldy washing machine door seal?  Well, it turns out, lots of you do!
Remember in the olden days?  Mum and gran would do most of their washing once a week and would always include a boil wash; there was no such thing as a mouldy door seal in their day.

Today, by contrast, we wash much more often at much lower temperatures, and this is is the reason why we have smelly, mouldy washing machines.

What Causes Black Mould to Appear On Door Seals

The root of the problem is a build up of bacteria inside your washing machine. The low-temperature washes create a cosy environment for the bacteria to grow and multiply. The residue left by this growth then allows the mould to grow.

Also, because of these low temperatures, residues from detergents and grease from your laundry remain in your washing machine creating the conditions for mould growth.

It's not only door seals that are affected.  You will also find black mould build up in the dispenser drawer and housing where you add the detergent and softener.

You should be aware that these are the visible areas.  You can see mould on your door seal every time you open the door.  Your mouldy soap drawer is evident every time you fill it up.  But what about the inside of the washing machine?  If your door seal is mouldy then the inside of the washing machine drum, where you put your washing, will also be covered with bacteria and mould!

How do bacteria get Into my washing machine

Bacteria enters your washing machine mainly from our soiled clothes.  Consider the following regular items of washing:

  • soiled bed linen
  • washable nappies
  • dog fouling remains on clothes
  • toilet mats
  • pet's bedding and towels
  • greasy overalls

While modern-day detergents are designed to wash at much lower temperatures, they won’t kill bacteria found on items such as listed above, in the way a boil wash does!

Consequences of Bacteria and Black Mould Build Up

Firstly, it is unsightly.  Secondly, it could become a health hazard. Mould can also release spores which have the potential to irritate the lungs when inhaled.
If the build-up is excessive, it may be transferred to the laundry as you remove it from your washing machine. These marks may be stubborn to remove from clothing.
Excessive build up will become slimy and start to smell.   If you leave your laundry in the washing machine drum for a length of time after the cycle has finished, you will notice that your clothes are smelly.
Sheared drum support shafts have become a real problem usually causing the washing machine to become uneconomic to repair.  The residue of bacteria build-up is a jelly-like substance which fills the cavities in the drum support shaft arms.  The support shaft arms are a metal alloy and acids created by bacteria enhance the corroding effect.

How can I treat and avoid bacteria in my washing machine

By merely replicating what we used to do years ago!  Now and then put your washing machine through a service wash to help kill any bacteria build up.


This fault can be the cause of other washing machine problems such as the door won’t open, and the drum is not spinning.

Check for blockages

First of all, you will want to empty the water from the washing machine.  Following the process outlined in the video below will also determine if you have a blockage, or not.

Check the pump

If your washing machine isn’t blocked, then the fault will most likely be with the pump.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to empty

Faulty Pump

Once a blockage has been ruled out the most likely cause of a washing machine not emptying is a faulty pump.

How to replace a washing machine door handle

Watch our DIY repair video on replacing a faulty washing machine pump.

Faulty Module

Although an uncommon fault, circuit boards do fail from time to time.  It is best to seek the advice of a qualified technician if you suspec a faulty control module.

Источник: https://www.ransomspares.co.uk/common-washing-machine-problems/

What is Autoclaving?

Autoclaving is a sterilization method that uses high-pressure steam. The autoclaving process works by the concept that the boiling point of water (or steam) increases when it is under pressure.

 

 

Image result for autoclave historyHistory of the Autoclave

The name “Autoclave” comes from Greek “auto” ultimately meaning self, and Latin “clavis” meaning key, thus a self-locking device.

 

The first autoclave was essentially a pressure cooker and was originally invented as a method for preparing food by French physician Denis Papin around 1681. He called his invention a "steam digester" and described benefits of using the device to process food for easier digestion. 

 

Charles Chamberland.jpg

The autoclave was re-invented for medical and scientific use by Charles Chamberland in 1879. Chamberland was a microbiologist who worked with Louis Pasteur.  By chance, he came up with a vaccine for chicken cholera. He went away on holiday, forgetting to inject the disease into some chickens. When he came back he saw the jar of bacteria still there and decided to inject it into the chickens anyway. To his amazement they did not die. When he reported this to Pasteur, he was told to inject a fresh form into the same chickens. Those chickens did not die. He had found a vaccine. This team also discovered that a weakened form of a disease can act as a vaccine.

 

 

How an Autoclave Works

Items to be autoclaved are subjected to gradual temperature increases under high pressure until 121 °C is reached and then steamed for around 15–20 minutes.

 

The autoclave allows steam to flow around items in the chamber. The length of time and temperature necessary for sterilization depend on the items to be sterilized and whether they are wrapped or left directly exposed to the steam. Items should be separated to allow the steam to penetrate the load evenly. The steam can reach in small crevices and can kill all bacteria, viruses and bacterial spores.

 

When to Autoclave

Autoclaves can be used to eliminate microorganisms, cure composites, vulcanize rubber, and for hydrothermal synthesis. Autoclaving is a very dependable method for the sterilization and decontamination of laboratory glassware, medical instruments and waste, reagents, and other media. Autoclaves can inactivate fungi, bacteria, spores, viruses and other microorganisms on surgical instruments such as scalpels, forceps, scissors and other metal items.

 

 

Why Autoclaving is Good for the Environment

Because autoclaving sterilizes without the use of reagents and allows for the re-use of lab equipment and supplies, it is environmentally friendly. It can be used to sterilize medical waste before disposal, eliminating environmental concerns regarding incinerators.

 

 

What Qorpak containers are Autoclavable?

Glass bottles are generally safe for autoclaving but some caps may not be autoclavable. 

 

Autoclavable products include:

·         Rubber Lined Phenolic Caps

·         Polypropylene Hole Caps with Bonded Septa

·         Unlined Polypropylene Caps with or without PTFE Disc Liners

·         Glass Bottles

·         Polypropylene Jars

 

Precautions

Closures should be autoclaved separately or very loosely on top of container; otherwise a vacuum is created during cooling. Liners will get sucked into the container or bottles and caps can crack or warp. Expanding vapors during heating can also cause containers to crack or explode without sufficient ventilation.

 

This method of sterilization should not be used if the material to be sterilized can be damaged by heat or moisture. Plastic resins that cannot be autoclaved include PET, PETG, LDPE, and HDPE, PET, PETG.

Paper products like paper and some plastic resins cannot be autoclaved due to the moist heat.

 

 

 

 

Источник: https://www.qorpak.com/pages/autoclaving

Pouring hot water to a pitcher

Some people are skeptical about using a glass pitcher for holding boiling water and hot beverages such as coffee or tea. It is a reasonable prerogative as many of us have experienced pouring hot liquid into a glass container and ended up breaking it. But this is not always the case.

Specifically made to withstand high temperatures, the best glass pitchers can hold hot drinks for a long time, and they will not crack. With extra care, you can even pour boiling water into these glass pitchers without shattering them.

Why Does Glass Crack with Hot Water?

A Pitcher of Berry Tea on Wooden Table

A generic glass pitcher, made of ordinary glass, undergoes expansion when subject to heat. Once you pour boiling water into the glass, the inside part of the glass expands due to heat while the outer layer remains cool. The temperature difference will cause the inner layer to expand far greater than the outer part.

The discrepancy in the amount of expansion between the inner and outer parts will create stress, which at some point will exceed the glass’s tensile strength. Once exceeded and the glass can no longer contain the pressure, also known as thermal shock, it will start to crack.

Why Some Glass Pitchers Don’t Crack

To be on the safe side, always use heat-resistant glass pitchers for your hot beverages. 

Typically constructed of borosilicate glass, which is known to have a very low thermal expansion coefficient, they are more resistant to thermal shock than other glassware. They will not break under extreme temperature changes.

The coefficient of thermal expansion indicates the rate at which the glass expands when exposed to heat. The higher it is, the greater the tendency of the glass to react to heat by expanding. With a low thermal expansion coefficient, borosilicate glass can withstand high temperatures without drastically changing its shape, area, volume, or density.

How to Prevent Glass Pitchers from Cracking

Coffee in Glass Pitcher

The effect of thermal shock is powerful and results in the cracking of glass. Even heat-resistant glasses like Pyrex can shatter when poured with boiling water incorrectly. To prevent the glass from cracking when exposed to boiling water, you should avoid extreme and abrupt changes in temperature. You can accomplish this in different ways.

  • Pour the boiling water gradually

By pouring the hot water into the glass pitcher gradually, you will allow the glass to adjust slowly to the water’s high temperature, reducing thermal shock.

Metal is an excellent heat conductor. When you put a metal spoon in the glass pitcher and slowly pour the water over the spoon, it will absorb some heat. This helps cool down the water that contacts the glass’s inner layer, minimizing its temperature deviation from the outer layer.

Another effective way to prevent breaking your glass pitcher when putting boiling water into it is to warm it up first. Before filling the glass, rinse it with 50% tap water and 50% boiling water; the outer layer first, then the inside part. By exposing the outside to heat, you let it expand before pouring the entire boiling water into the bottle, which means less thermal shock.

Shatter-Free Glass Pitcher

Pouring boiling water into a glass pitcher can be tricky. The key is to reduce the temperature difference between the inner and outer layers. By minimizing thermal shock, you can enjoy a no-worry, shatter-free pour.

Let us know your thoughts about glass pitchers in the comment section below. If you found this article helpful, feel free to share it with your friends.


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Источник: https://advancedmixology.com/blogs/art-of-mixology/pour-boiling-water-into-glass-pitcher

The Best Way To Store Flax & Chia Seeds

How To Store Flax Chia Seeds

Superfoods, like chia seeds, flax seeds, goji berries and more, are becoming commonplace in kitchens across the world. Now that we all know what they are and why we should eat them, it’s time to learn how to store them properly.

The BEST way to store flax and chia seeds – and all superfoods – is in a glass mason jar in the refrigerator.

It sounds simple, but storing your superfoods this way is super important. Here’s why:

1. Easy Access: You can see what you have and how much you have left.

Too many opaque containers get pushed to the back of the refrigerator, and you might not even know they’re there. Storing them in a see-through container means you’ll use more of them, more often.

Tip: use a label or masking tape to add the name and expiration date to the lid if there’s a chance you won’t use it by the expiration date or if you might forget what’s in the jar.

2. Extended shelf life: Nuts and seeds contain delicate oils, and those oils can quickly spoil.

Storing them in the refrigerator will extend their shelf life; this will save you money in the long run. Mason jars can also be sealed tightly, which keeps the air out and helps prevent oxidation. Throwing away expired food is sad for everyone.

Note: If your superfoods came in a package on the shelf – flax and chia seeds often are – that’s perfectly fine. Some companies vacuum seal their packages to store at room temperature to be shelf-stable. Just store it in the refrigerator after you open them.

3. Fewer dishes: Most of these superfoods are easy to pour out of the jar; fewer scoops and spoons mean fewer dishes.

Sprinking your favorite superfoods onto salads and into the blender with your smoothie ingredients has never been easier. Use the lid as a guide if you have a heavy pouring hand.

4. They’re inexpensive: Mason jars are inexpensive and can be found online or at a hardware store.

I’ve found them in packs of 12 for less than a dollar each. Bonus! They also make excellent drinking glasses and flower vases. You can store your green drinks in them, too.

5. They’re good for the environment: Glass jars are reusable and last forever.

Plus, glass is non-reactive, so you can feel good about storing food in them for long periods of time.

Tip: Mason jar companies now make BPA-free plastic lids that are cheap and are a little easier to open than the traditional metal canning lids. The metal canning lids can also rust after multiple uses, so these new white lids are awesome. I found them at my local hardware store for just a few dollars.

Here are a few of the superfoods that are always find in mason jars in my refrigerator:

  • Raw almonds
  • Raw hemp seeds
  • Ground flaxseeds
  • Raw sunflower seeds
  • Cacao (raw cocoa powder)
  • Chia seeds
  • Dried goji berries

And once you master the basics above, here are nine more superfoods that you can try.

Happy superfood shopping!

Источник: https://www.elizabethrider.com/best-way-to-store-flax-chia-seeds/

Egg dos and don'ts & using eggs in cocktails

Egg dos and don'ts & using eggs in cocktails image 1

Eggs are essentially reproductive cells from everything from chickens to ducks and quails but here we are specifically looking at chicken eggs, their characteristics and how you should handle, store and use eggs in cocktails.

Eggs in cocktails

Egg white adds viscosity and mouthfeel to cocktails and drinks such as sours only taste their best when made with added egg white. Egg white can also add an attractive foamy head to cocktails and the amount of foam produced can be extenuated using a Dry Shake. However, raw eggs can be hazardous to health, so you may decide it is safer to use commercially produced pasteurised egg white, particularly if you are infirm or pregnant (but then you probably shouldn't be drinking cocktails anyway).

Unfortunately, egg white in cocktails gives off an aroma not unlike dog breath or a damp dog's coat. This should be masked with a few drops of bitters dropped onto the drink's foamy head, expressing citrus zest oils (twist) over the drink or by dusting with chocolate, nutmeg or cinnamon.

Too much egg white in a cocktail is detrimental and half of the white from a medium sized egg or 15ml/½oz of pasteurised egg white is plenty. When using fresh eggs rather than pasteurised egg white, I tend to crack eggs and separate their white into a small plastic squeeze bottle and then use this to squeeze the desired amount of egg white into each cocktail. Tip 1: Consider using an egg separator, a nifty tool which as its name suggests separates and retains the yolk while allowing the yolk to flow through into your receptacle below. This helps avoid the chance of contamination from the shell by using the shell as a separating tool. Tip 2: It pays to shake the bottle before use to slightly loosen the egg whites. Refrigerate the bottle of egg white and use within 48 hours or preferably sooner.

Like egg white, egg yolk adds texture and also subtle flavour and a rich sweetness to cocktails. Egg yolk is essential when making Nogs and Flips.

Health issues with raw egg

A small percentage of people are allergic to eggs with reactions against egg white more common than reactions against egg yolk. While not experiencing a true allergic reaction, some people have an intolerance to egg white. Whether allergic, merely intolerant or simply having a dislike for eggs, some people need/want to avoid egg and egg products, so bar menus should indicate their use in cocktails.

I'm sure I've suffered more upset stomachs from drinking too much alcohol than I have as a result of bad eggs. That said, eggs are susceptible to Salmonella contamination so it's worth taking steps to reduce the risk of Salmonella poisoning so you should be aware of the following dos and don'ts.

1. Consider using pasteurised egg rather than fresh egg. Particularly, in a bar or a restaurant, why would you take risk of serving fresh egg white when good quality refrigerated pasteurised egg white is undistinguishable from fresh egg white in a cocktail. Pasteurised egg white may cost a little more, but it comes in handy to use 500g Tera cartons - enough for 30+ cocktails.

2. Use eggs well before their use-by-date and preferably eggs stamped with the British Lion eggs safe logo. On 11th October 2017, The Food Standards Agency changed its advice to say that British Lion marked eggs are safe to be eaten raw by vulnerable groups such as infants, children, pregnant women and elderly people. More than 90% of British eggs are now produced within the British Lion scheme, which requires producers to vaccinate their hens against salmonella and to test for salmonella.

3.Use small or medium eggs rather than large sized eggs (as hens grow older, they will produce larger eggs so small eggs are from younger birds).

4. Preferably use organic eggs as they are laid by hens who have been reared in the most humane way possible. Everything from their housing, freedom of movement and food is strictly governed. After organic, free-range is the next best environment for a hen to be raised and then barn eggs.

5. If you buy eggs which have already been refrigerated (usual in USA), then you should keep them in the fridge or they will sweat. If you purchase eggs at room temperature (the norm in Europe) then you should be sure to store them below 20°C / 68°F and ideally refrigerated between 0.5 to 2.5°C / 33 to 36.5°F.

6. It is best to store your eggs in a sealed box on the bottom self of the refrigerator. Storing in a box prevents smells permeating through the shells and flavouring the egg. Conversely you may want to place citrus peels, spices, truffles or teas in the box, or cotton wool infused with aromatic oil to flavour your eggs.

7. Test the freshness of an egg by placing in water. A fresh egg will sink but a stale one will float.

8. Salmonella contamination starts on the shell, moves to the egg white and then lastly the yolk, so always wash the shell of an egg under running warm/hot water immediately prior to using. However, due to their protective coating, don't wash eggs until ready to use. See washing eggs below.

Don't consume raw eggs if

1. You are uncertain about their freshness.

2. There is a crack or flaw in the shell.

3. They don't wobble when rolled across a flat surface.

4. The egg white is watery instead of gel-like.

5. The egg yolk is not convex and firm.

6. The egg yolk bursts easily.

7. They smell foul.

8. Don't consume raw eggs at all if are pregnant or have a weak immune system or other health issues, particularly to the very young or very old.

9. Don't think that alcohol kills salmonella, it doesn't, at least at proof levels used in bars.

10. Don't crack eggs on the side of your cocktail tin, salmonella may be present on the shell so beware of transferring this and cross contaminating your shaker.

Washing eggs

Eggs have a natural coating known as a cuticle or bloom that seals the eggshell pores so reducing moisture loss from the egg. This also helps prevent bacteria from breaching the shell. In the U.S. most eggs are washed and "sanitized" so removing the bloom, then a small percentage of U.S. egg packers re-coat their eggs with an edible mineral oil. European eggs are not washed by egg packers so are sold with the natural bloom. Wherever you are, you should not wash your eggs until immediately prior to use as if they have a coating then it best to retain it as long as possible. When you do wash your eggs, then rinse under running warm/hot water.

Air cell

When eggs are freshly laid their temperature is that of the body of the hen they have just popped out of, 41ºC/105ºF. As they cool to ambient temperature, the liquid inside the eggs contracts more than the shell, causing the inner shell membrane to separate from the outer shell membrane and so form an air pocket, or air cell. Over the following hours/days, moisture and carbon dioxide from the egg escape through the shell's pores and due to air pressure, air enters via the same pores so enlarging the air cell.

When you peel a hard-boiled egg, you tend to find one pole of the egg is flattened due to the air cell which usually occupies the large end of the egg, displacing the egg white to form a flattened end when boiled.

Due to the air cell developing and growing with time, older eggs are easier to peel that fresh eggs. The development of this air pocket also facilitates a useful test for the freshness of eggs. If the buoyancy caused by this air pocket causes an egg to float in a bowl of water, then it is bad and should be discarded. Only eggs that sink and stay submerged should be used in cocktails.

Shell colour

A hen's breed determines the shell colour of the eggs laid. Hens with white feathers and ear lobes lay white-shelled eggs while hens with red feathers and red ear lobes lay brown eggs.

The shell colour has no influence on flavour or nutritionally value, yet despite this, different countries favour particular shell colours. White eggs are more prevalent in the USA, while brown shells are preferred in the UK. Marketing also dictates that most organic eggs and free-range eggs are brown. Indeed, I recall a food nutritionist say, "brown food is good and white food is bad". This may apply to bread and rice, but not to eggs.

While shell colour has no baring on flavour, the colour of the yolk does. This is influenced by plant pigments in the hen's feed - more grass based feed or corn in particular. Tasty feed equals tasty eggs.

Super food

Eggs are very nutritious, containing high levels of protein, vitamins, selenium, iodine, choline, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids. Eggs are low in calories (around 65 calories in a medium-sized egg) with most of the calories are in the yolk which is also denser in vitamins and minerals.

Egg white

The egg white (or albumen/glair/glaire) forms around fertilized or unfertilised egg yolks and its primary purpose is to protect the yolk while also providing nutrition for the growth of the embryo (presuming the egg is fertilized).

Egg white comprises approximately two-thirds of a chicken egg by weight with water accounting for some 90% of this, with the remaining 10% being protein, glucose, carbohydrate, sodium, fatty material and vitamins. Egg white is cholesterol free and an average sized egg white has a mere 17 calories. Egg whites contain just over 50% of the overall egg's protein content.

Egg yolk

Enclosed by the vitelline membrane and suspended in the egg white by one or two spiral bands of tissue called chalazae, the spherical egg yolk contains the egg cell or ovum (embryo). Its yellow colour is due to lutein and zeaxanthin, which are carotenoids known as xanthophylls.

The yolk is rich in vitamins and minerals and contains all the egg's fat and cholesterol, and nearly half of its protein. Although just one-third of the egg's overall weight, the yolk contains three times the energy (calories) of the egg white and all of an egg's fat-soluble vitamins A, E, K and most notably D - egg yolk is one of the few foods naturally containing vitamin D.

Double yolks - two yolks in one egg, come from young hens (pullets), typically 16 to 20 weeks old which are still settling into their egg laying cycle and ovulating too rapidly.

Egg dos and don'ts & using eggs in cocktails image 1
Источник: https://www.diffordsguide.com/encyclopedia/509/cocktails/egg-dos-and-donts-and-using-eggs-in-cocktails

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Asking a beauty professional—whether it’s a celebrity hairstylist, makeup artist, or Instagram influencer—for advice is always a safe bet. But dig a little deeper, and you’ll find there are plenty of other women out there who are legitimate authorities in their own right. In our column Unlikely Experts, they’ll give real reviews and recommendations. Whether it’s surfers on the best conditioners, bikers on the best cleansers or ballerinas on the best foot creams, it’s fair to say these women know best.

If you ask a room full of surgeons—regardless of their specialty or status—what their most important tool is, there’s a good chance each and every one will tell you it’s their hands. And how could they not be? Their hands are behind every incision, stitch, and decision they make, so it only makes sense that surgeons would know all there is to know about keeping them in good shape.

“Surgeons are battlefield experts in hand care because, whether we want to be or not, frequent hand washing, dryness, chapped joints, and need for full function are real parts of our lives,” says New York City surgeon Lara Devgan, M.D. “I wash my hands hundreds of times a week—sometimes more than 50 times a day—so I’m always thinking about how to best take care of them.”

Considering the average person isn’t performing dozens of surgeries a day, we figured any hand cream a surgeon swears by is good enough for the rest of us. From drugstore favorites to luxury treatments, check out their recommendations on the best hand lotions and creams ahead.

Источник: https://www.glamour.com/gallery/best-hand-lotion

A blender is the only machine in your kitchen that can produce a beverage from chunks of ice and fruit in less than 60 seconds. And no other blender we’ve tested since 2012 can reliably produce silky soups, spoon-thick smoothies, and stable emulsifications like the Vitamix 5200. Yes, it’s pricey, but we think its powerful motor, nuanced controls, and long-lasting reliability make it worth the investment.

In our tests, from 2012 to now, Vitamix blenders have always performed the best overall. The classic Vitamix 5200 is the only one we’ve tried that can make creamy peanut butter and puree hearty soup without spewing molten liquid up the sides of the jar. It doesn’t have any preset buttons, but it does offer the widest range of speeds (far wider than on the comparably priced Blendtec Designer 675) of any blender we’ve tested. It’s a favorite in many (if not most) professional kitchens and juice bars. We’ve also found the Vitamix 5200 to be one of the most reliable and durable blenders we’ve tested, and if the motor burns out within the seven-year warranty period, Vitamix will promptly replace the machine.

The Oster Versa Pro Series Blender is the best of a new breed of more budget-friendly high-powered blenders. Compared with similarly priced blenders, this 1,400-watt model offers more speed variations and runs more quietly; it’s also one of the few models that come with a tamper for bursting air pockets in thick mixtures. At 17½ inches tall, it will fit better on a counter under a cabinet than most other high-performance blenders. We don’t think this is the absolute best blender out there, and it doesn’t compare to Vitamix blenders in power and longevity (we burned out our Oster after two and a half years), but it does have serious blending skills, a user-friendly design, and a solid, seven-year warranty. If you don’t want to throw down almost half a grand on a powerful blender, the Oster is your best bet.

If you’re not ready to spring for the Vitamix, and you don’t mind trading the Oster’s longer warranty for a little more power, go for the 1,800-watt Cleanblend Blender. The Cleanblend’s strong motor helps pulverize berry seeds and ice, creating creamier smoothies and piña coladas than even the Vitamix can produce. This model’s jar is made of thick, durable Tritan plastic and has a comfortable, grippy handle. Unlike the Oster blender, the Cleanblend doesn’t have any preset buttons and doesn’t offer much variance between the low and high speeds. In our testing, the Cleanblend’s motor has held up better than the Oster’s and is still going strong after four years of regular use. But Cleanblend covers this blender with only a five-year warranty, in contrast to the seven years of coverage from both Vitamix and Oster. And since Cleanblend has been around only since 2013, we’re still a little uncertain of the company’s staying power and the reliability of its customer service.

Not everyone wants to spend $200, let alone over $400, on a blender. If you want a blender for whipping up the occasional sauce or smoothie, the KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender is the best model available for around $100. With a 48-ounce jar and a low profile, the K150 is the smallest blender we recommend in this guide. It produced coarser textures than any of our other picks did, and its motor isn’t nearly as powerful (so it’s more likely to burn out if overtaxed). Another compromise you make for the price is in the warranty, as unlike our other picks the KitchenAid is covered for only one year. But it’s a good, all-purpose blender that’s small enough to fit on the counter under most kitchen cabinets.

Why you should trust us

As a senior staff writer for Wirecutter, I’ve covered everything from chef’s knives to stand mixers, and I’ve tested every blender worth testing since 2014. I also have a breadth of cooking and entertaining knowledge from decades of working in restaurants and magazine test kitchens. This guide builds on the work of Christine Cyr Clisset, now a deputy editor at Wirecutter.

We reached out to Jonathan Cochran, a former blender salesperson who now runs the site Blender Dude, for his take on the best Vitamix and Blendtec models to test (his site has affiliate partnerships with both companies). For our original guide, authored by Seamus Bellamy, we consulted with Lisa McManus, an executive editor in charge of equipment testing at Cook’s Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines.

Blender vs. food processor: Which one should you get?

Although there’s some overlap in what they can do, blenders and food processors aren’t interchangeable appliances. A countertop blender is a better tool for making purees, quick sauces, and emulsifications (such as mayonnaise and vinaigrette), and it’s the only appliance that can whip berries and fibrous veggies into a silky-smooth texture. Because a blender’s jar is narrow and usually angled at the base, it creates a vortex that helps pass ingredients through the blades more frequently than in a food processor, yielding smoother textures.

With a little effort, you can also puree wet ingredients (such as tomatoes for sauce) in a food processor, but the doughnut-shaped container doesn’t handle liquids as well as a blender’s jar does—it tends to leak. A food processor works fine for thick purees like hummus and is great for sauces with a coarser texture like pesto. But it can’t make a good smoothie and—since you can’t control the speed of the blades—is liable to shoot hot soup everywhere. Instead, a food processor is best for chopping, slicing, and grating. With the right attachment, it can even mix and knead dough. Many people use food processors for mincing vegetables, but this appliance is also your best friend for easily grating cheese, slicing potatoes for a gratin, grinding fresh bread crumbs, or quickly cutting butter into flour to make pie dough.

In short, blenders liquefy, food processors chop and slice. Depending on your needs, you might choose one over the other, or you might want both. We have a guide to the best food processors, too, if you’re interested.

What type of blender should you get?

A countertop blender delivers the silkiest smoothies, daiquiris, soups, and sauces of any style of blender you can buy. It’s more versatile than a personal blender (which is meant mainly for smoothies) because it holds more and can handle hot liquids. It’s also more powerful than an immersion blender, which is great for pureeing soups directly in the pot or making a quick mayo but doesn’t yield the velvety textures you get from a good countertop blender.

That said, a blender’s performance and longevity are usually proportional to its cost. High-end blenders are more powerful and designed to puree the thickest mixtures without burning out, something that inexpensive blenders simply can’t do. If you want a kitchen workhorse—a machine that can tackle everything from hot soups and sauces to thick frozen concoctions—a full-size, high-powered blender is the best choice. How much you should spend on one depends on exactly what you’ll use it for. Below is a breakdown of what each of our picks will do for you.

Get our budget pick, the KitchenAid, if:

  • You use your blender only for the occasional smoothie, frozen drink, or soup.
  • You don’t blend nut butters or other motor-taxing mixtures.
  • A short, limited one-year warranty isn’t a concern.

Get our runner-up, the Oster, or our also-great pick, the Cleanblend, if:

  • You blend no more than a few times a week.
  • You rarely make nut butters.
  • A five- or seven-year warranty is important to you.

Get our top pick, the Vitamix, if:

  • Blending is part of your daily lifestyle.
  • You frequently blend thick, motor-taxing mixtures like nut butters and spoonable smoothies.
  • You want a blender with the widest range of speeds for easily doing everything from blending hot liquids to pulverizing ice cubes.
  • A seven-year warranty is important to you.

Alternatively, if you just want to make a daily smoothie, you might be better off with a NutriBullet (we’ve tested them all).

How we picked

Four blenders on a kitchen counter side by side.

Since 2012, we’ve researched or tested almost every decent household blender available, from budget models starting at $40 to powerful, high-performance models topping out at $700. In all this testing, we’ve found the following criteria to be the most important to look for in a blender:

Jar shape and motor strength

A great blender should be able to smoothly process tough items like fibrous kale, frozen berries, and ice without burning out the motor. How efficiently a blender does this depends on a combination of the blade length and position, the shape of the mixing jar, and the motor strength. All three of those elements combine to create a vortex that pulls food down around the blade.

In our testing, we’ve found that tall, tapered jars with a curved bottom develop a more consistent vortex than short, wide ones with a flat bottom. But the better blending that you get from a taller, tapered jar comes with a trade-off: A fully assembled blender might be too tall to fit under low-hanging cabinets. Blenders with wide, short jars are better for countertop storage, but you’re sacrificing performance for that convenience.

A more powerful motor also helps to create a better vortex and blends thick mixtures more easily than a weaker one. But a blender’s power rating isn’t easy information to come by. Most blender companies advertise only “peak horsepower,” a spec that’s misleading if you’re trying to determine a motor’s strength. A motor works at peak horsepower for just a fraction of a second, when you start the blender, in order to overcome inertia. Immediately after, the motor drops to its “rated horsepower,” which is the amount of power it can sustain without burning out. As explained on Cooking For Engineers, you can get a ballpark estimate of a blender’s rated horsepower by dividing its wattage by 746 (because 746 watts equals approximately one unit of electrical horsepower). This equation doesn’t account for efficiency, but it does offer a more realistic approximation of a blender’s power output.

We’ve found that tall, tapered jars with a curved bottom develop a more consistent vortex than short, wide ones with a flat bottom.

Jar material

Most of the blenders we’ve tested come with plastic jars. All of our picks have jars made of BPA-free Tritan plastic, which is very durable. Many of the lower-end blenders we’ve tested don’t advertise which material their jars are made of beyond a “BPA-free” note. But the majority of these jars are probably made of polycarbonate, which is more rigid than Tritan but also very strong. Both materials will crack if heated too high, which is why these jars should not go in the dishwasher.

We understand that some folks prefer metal or glass jars. But you’d be hard-pressed to find a powerful blender with a glass jar, and there’s probably a good reason for this. As April Jones explains in her article on Cooking For Engineers: “Due to the high-speed blades and high horsepower motors, glass isn’t the safest option for professional-grade blenders. If a metal object, such as a spoon or knife, were accidentally left in the blender, a glass pitcher could shatter and potentially cause an injury. Using polycarbonate plastics or copolyester is a much safer option to avoid the hazard of broken glass.” Stainless steel jars are durable but opaque, and we like to monitor the progress of purees and emulsifications without having to remove the lid.

Price

Judging from buyer reviews, the holy grail for many home cooks seems to be a $50 or $100 blender that performs like a $500 Vitamix or Blendtec. But that isn’t realistic. High-end blenders priced at $150 and up—often called high-performance blenders—offer more power, produce much smoother textures, and generally last a lot longer than lower-end, under-$100 blenders. High-performance blenders also tackle tasks that you’d never want to try in a cheap blender, such as making peanut butter or milling grains.

That said, there’s nothing wrong with a cheap blender as long as you understand its limitations. Some people want an affordable midrange blender to make the occasional daiquiri or smoothie. So we’ve tested blenders in a wide range of prices with the understanding that, for the most part, you get what you pay for.

Warranty

The most common complaint we’ve found about cheap blenders is that their motors burn out easily and their jars crack or leak. But it’s not impossible for even higher-end blenders to encounter burnout. As Lisa McManus, executive editor in charge of equipment testing at Cook’s Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines, told our writer Seamus Bellamy in an interview for our 2012 guide, “Blenders have a really hard job to do in that little space. The motor is only so big. If you make it do something difficult every day, a lot of them burn out. It’s a lot of stress to put on a little machine.” This is why a long warranty is important, especially if you’re paying a lot for a blender. Vitamix, Oster, and Cleanblend models all come with warranties of five to seven years, and—at least for Vitamix machines—we’ve read plenty of owner reviews saying the blender lasts much longer. You can’t expect that level of performance from dirt-cheap blenders, which is probably why most of them come with only one-year limited warranties.

One of our authors, documenting the testing notes in a notebook.

Speed control

Whether you choose a blender with manual controls or preset functions is largely a personal preference. But we appreciate a powerful blender with a simple interface that includes an on/off switch, a pulse button, and a variable-speed dial. These easy controls allow you to quickly adjust the speed or turn off the machine if things get messy.

Preset programs for making smoothies, mixing soups, or crushing ice can be great if you want to multitask in the kitchen while blending. But we’ve also found that these functions rarely deliver purees as smooth as when we control the speed and time with the manual setting.

Tamper

In our years of testing, we’ve found that a tamper—a small plastic bat that lets you push food down into the blades—separates the great blenders from the good ones. When a blender is really cranking, air pockets tend to form around the blade, and a tamper allows you to burst them without having to stop the machine. The tamper that comes with a blender is designed to safely clear the blades of that particular model, as long as you use it with the lid on. Using a different tamper or another tool that might hit the moving blades is dangerous and could damage the machine. If your blender doesn’t come with a tamper, the only way you should burst air pockets is to turn the machine off, remove the jar from the base, and stir the mixture with a spoon.

One of our writers shown using a blender to make a smoothie.

So why don’t all blenders come with a tamper? Because forcing frozen and thick mixtures into the blades puts a lot of stress on the motor. Performance blenders that include tampers have powerful motors that can handle this stress—they’re designed for it. But cheaper blenders have weaker motors. If they were to include tampers, people would probably push these machines past their limits, ultimately prompting the motor to burn out.

How we tested

A bowl of kale, ready for future smoothies, next to the Cleanblend blender smoothie maker.

We judged each model on how well it performed everyday blending jobs such as making thick frozen smoothies and hot soups. We also wanted to see which blenders could emulsify eggs and oil into mayonnaise and pulverize nuts into a smooth butter. In each blender, we made a thick green smoothie packed with frozen bananas and berries, kale, and coconut water. We looked at each blender’s ability to create a consistent vortex without taxing the motor or needing additional liquid. Afterward, we tasted the smoothies to assess mouthfeel, and then we strained the remainder through a fine-mesh sieve to see how well the blenders had pulverized tough greens and berry seeds.

A blender can be a useful tool for making emulsified sauces such as mayonnaise, hollandaise, vinaigrettes, and Caesar dressing, so we tested each model’s ability to emulsify mayonnaise made with one egg yolk. Making a successful blender mayonnaise (or hollandaise or Caesar) hinges on the blades sitting low enough in the jar that they start whipping the egg yolk before you add a drop of oil.

To see how the motors handled dense purees, we processed raw peanuts into peanut butter. With our finalists, we made rounds of piña coladas to see how well they blended ice into slush.

Additionally, we noted how easy or difficult each blender was to clean, how noisy each model was, whether any of them produced a burning smell while the motor ran, whether the jars were difficult to attach to the bases, and how easy the interfaces were to use.

Our pick: Vitamix 5200

The Vitamix 5200 shown on a kitchen counter.

The Vitamix 5200 offers the best performance you can get in a home blender. This model has been one of our favorite blenders since 2014, and it’s the classic Vitamix that has remained the standard for pro chefs and blender enthusiasts. It consistently performed at the top of the pack in our tests, and it came recommended to us by multiple experts because it powerfully purees and pulverizes food more reliably, thoroughly, and elegantly than most blenders.

The Vitamix 5200 did not make the absolute smoothest smoothies of all the blenders we tested—that prize went to the Blendtec and Cleanblend machines. But when it came to consistent and graceful performance, the Vitamix won every time. This model was the only blender we tested that smoothly blended peanuts and almonds into butter. And whereas other blenders, such as the Blendtec, Cleanblend, and Oster, spit bits of mayo up the sides of the jar and out the lid’s center hole, the Vitamix kept the mixture smoothly and evenly moving around the base of the blade.

We found Vitamix’s variable-speed dial to have the best range among the blenders we tried. Its low is really low, and the blender produces a noticeable shift as you advance through each number. In our tests, this range of speeds made the Vitamix the best blender for hot liquids: You can start blending at a lazy swirl and slowly increase the speed so that the hot liquid is less likely to shoot up toward the lid and risk a volcanic, trip-to-the-burn-unit situation. In comparison, the Cleanblend has a forceful start on the lowest setting, which increases the chances of a painful eruption when you’re blending hot soups. The same goes for the Blendtec Designer 675, which in our tests was so powerful that the soup setting created a cyclone in a jar.

The Vitamix’s tamper is essential for breaking up air pockets and pushing ingredients down toward the blade while the machine is running. When using models without a tamper, we often needed to stop the blender to burst air pockets or scrape ingredients down the sides of the jar with a spatula. In some cases, we also had to add more water to the smoothie to get all the ingredients to move around the blades without the help of a tamper. For all these reasons, blending in the Vitamix with a tamper took about half the time as it took in the Blendtec with no included tamper. By keeping the ingredients moving, we were able to whip up a smoothie in about 30 seconds.

The speed controls and switches on the Vitamix 5200 blender.

The Vitamix’s Tritan-plastic jar feels sturdier than those of the other blenders we recommend, and the grippy handle is comfortable to hold. We also found the tall, narrow, tapered shape of the jar to be ideal for creating a strong vortex that pulled ingredients down toward the blade. That feature helped the Vitamix blend more efficiently than the Oster, with its wider jar, and the result was vastly superior to what we got from the wide, blocky jar of the Blendtec. Like the jars of most other high-powered blenders, the jar of the Vitamix (which has the blade attached) is very easy to clean: After you make a smoothie or something similar, you should find it sufficient to just pour in a bit of hot water, add a couple of drops of dish soap, blend for 30 seconds or so, and then rinse out the jar.

No high-powered blender we tested could be described as quiet, but we found the noise from the Vitamix to be much less offensive than the high-pitched whine of the Blendtec, and it was quieter than the roar of our runner-up, the Oster Versa.

Should its motor overheat, the Vitamix is equipped with an automatic shutoff feature to keep it from burning out. In our experience, the Vitamix should be able to handle a lot before it gets to that point, but if your Vitamix does shut off, it’s best to let the machine rest for an hour before you try to use it again.

One thing that softens the blow of spending more than $400 on a Vitamix is the comfort of knowing that it’s backed by a seven-year warranty. We called Vitamix’s customer service and learned that the approximate time between filing a claim and receiving your blender back in working order (or a certified refurb) is six to 10 days. For an additional fee, you can buy a three-year extended warranty for the 5200. If you purchase a new Vitamix from the company’s site or from a certified third-party retailer, such as Amazon, you have 30 days from the date of purchase to buy the extended warranty directly from Vitamix for $75. After 30 days have passed, you can purchase the extended warranty up until the original one expires for around $120.

You can save some money on a Vitamix if you opt for a certified-refurbished model. Jonathan Cochran of Blender Dude highly recommends them. “My pick for ‘best bang for the buck’ continues to be the Certified Refurbished (Blendtec) and Certified Reconditioned (Vitamix) models. I have personally inspected hundreds of each, and for all intents and purposes they are indistinguishable from the new models at a significantly reduced price point,” he told us. A certified reconditioned Vitamix comes with a five-year warranty, with the option to extend coverage three more years for an additional $75.

Long-term test notes

We used the same Vitamix 5200 in our test kitchen for five years with nothing but excellent results. It finally did burn out, but only after we put it through strenuous use over the course of many tests for both this guide and others. Still, it easily outlasted the Oster, and it made many more (and better) batches of nut butter and extra-thick smoothies before we pushed it to its limit. Since our Vitamix was still under warranty when it burned out, we contacted customer service, and the representatives promptly replaced it.

I’ve also used a Vitamix at home for years, and it’s still my favorite household blender, period. I long-term tested the runner-up, the Oster, for six months and noticed some glaring differences: The Vitamix can handle more without its motor straining, and the Vitamix’s tamper is much better than the Oster’s, which is really hard to get down in there.

Over the years, other Wirecutter staffers have expressed love for their Vitamix blenders. Former special projects editor Ganda Suthivarakom, who had used hers since 2015 without issue, said: “I love that I can make a lot of vegan recipes for cashew creams without having to soak the nuts beforehand.” Senior staff writer Chris Heinonen, who has owned his Vitamix since 2018, guesses that he has “used it more than all my blenders in the past combined.” The only minor complaint we’ve heard is from senior editor Kalee Thompson, who notes: “It’s so tall, it doesn’t fit under the upper shelves over my counters ... so I’m less inclined to leave it out, and once it’s away, I don’t use it as much.” That said, others have told us how much they appreciate the Vitamix’s large capacity.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

We know that for many people, the biggest issue with the Vitamix 5200 is its steep price. At around $400 or so, it’s at least twice the price of our runner-up, the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender. In the past, we’ve even made the Oster our top pick because of its comparatively affordable price. But after years of testing the Vitamix and using it in our test kitchen, we think it’s truly worth the investment. It’s more durable and all-around more effective than any other blender we’ve found, and if you plan on using a blender regularly, it will make your life a lot easier. Plus, consider the cost of buying a smoothie rather than making it at home: A morning smoothie can run from about $5 to $13, so in two to four months you will have paid the same amount as for a 5200. A Vitamix, by contrast, will last you at least seven years (and it makes a lot more than smoothies).

At more than 20 inches tall, the Vitamix 5200 is a big appliance—too big to fit under some kitchen cabinets. But none of the other high-powered blenders we tested were much smaller. Though the Oster is a couple of inches shorter, it also has a beefier base. If size is an issue for you, Vitamix makes other lines of blenders (as mentioned below) that have a shorter profile. But we’ve found that the tall, narrow shape of the 5200’s blending jar is one of the components that help this machine create such an effective vortex.

Finally, the Vitamix 5200 doesn’t come with any presets, just a variable-speed dial. But even though it’s nice to be able to press a button and have your blender run through a smoothie-making program, it’s not really essential. You’ll probably stick close to your blender anyway in order to use the tamper to get things moving, and it’s not hard to adjust the dial if you feel the need to. With the Vitamix it’s also easy to get good results without any presets.

What about other Vitamix models?

The 5200 isn’t the only blender in Vitamix’s selection—if you want the blending power of the 5200 but strongly prefer presets, or if you need a shorter jar that will fit your space, consider looking into other models. (If you want a good breakdown of the different Vitamix models, Jonathan Cochran of Blender Dude compares them.)

That said, the original 5200 remains our favorite because every new blender from Vitamix comes with a squat jar that doesn’t blend small amounts as well as the 5200’s tall and tapered pitcher. We tested the 5300, for example, and found that the base of its short jar was too wide to develop and maintain a vortex for making, say, a thick smoothie for one or two people. Check out the Competition section for more detailed testing notes on the 5300.

We haven’t tested any models from the new Vitamix Ascent Series, but we suspect we’d have the same issue with the shorter, squatter jars. According to owner reviews, the Ascent blenders seem to suffer from some other problems, too, such as a complicated adapter for the personal blending cup and a sensor that shuts off the machine if it detects that the mixture in the jar is too thick. Our favorite feature of the 5200 is its ability to blend absurdly thick concoctions!

Runner-up: Oster Versa Pro Series Blender

Our runner-up pick the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender on a kitchen counter.

We don’t think you can beat the value of the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender. It isn’t quite as powerful as the Vitamix 5200, but it is about half the price, and it beat out most of the other blenders in its price range at making silky smoothies, purees, and blended cocktails. It has one of the best combinations of variable and preset speeds we’ve found, and its settings are more intuitive to use than those on other models we’ve tried. It also offers features, such as a tamper and overheating protection, that are usually available only on more expensive blenders. We don’t think the Oster is as durable as the Vitamix (ours burned out after two and a half years). But it does come with a seven-year warranty, and it’s a great option if you’re not ready to spring for the Vitamix.

The Oster passed almost every challenge we threw at it. And although it failed to achieve the absolute smoothest drink textures compared with the Blendtec or the Cleanblend—it left whole raspberry seeds in smoothies and made a slightly grainy piña colada—its smoothies were still much smoother than any of the results from lower-priced blenders. As long as the Oster had about 2 cups of nuts to work with, it made a decent nut butter (albeit one that was slightly crunchier than the batch we made in the Vitamix). And it whipped up a velvety puree. The only thing the Oster really struggled to do was make mayonnaise; we were able to make an emulsification only once out of four tries.

We found the Oster easier to control than other blenders of a similar price, thanks to its wide range of speeds. Though not as varied as those on the Vitamix, the speeds on the Oster are far more diverse than those on the Cleanblend, which, despite its variable-speed dial, seems to have only two settings: high and higher. In comparison, the Oster’s low speed is sane enough that you can start pureeing a batch of soup without having hot liquid shoot up the sides of the jar (a problem with the Cleanblend).

A smoothie made by the Oster being tested for smoothness by running it through a mesh strainer.

The Oster is the only one of our blender picks to have both manual speed controls and preset programs for soup, dip, and smoothies. This makes it more versatile than the more expensive entry-level models from Vitamix and Blendtec, which have only variable or preset speeds, respectively. To get presets with a Vitamix, or a variable-speed “touch slider” with a Blendtec model, you need to spend even more.

The tamper that comes with the Oster is a little too short and oddly shaped. In contrast to the smooth cylindrical tampers of the Vitamix and Cleanblend models, the Oster’s tamper has three flat pieces of plastic that meet in the middle. But the design works sufficiently to burst air bubbles and help move things like peanuts around the blades, so it’s better than no tamper at all.

This Oster model, like other high-performance blenders, is a beefy machine. The base takes up 8 by 9 inches of counter space. But at 17½ inches tall to the top of the lid, the Oster will fit better on a counter under most kitchen cabinets than the Vitamix or the Cleanblend, both of which are more than 19 inches tall.

Also, like all the other high-powered blenders we tested, the Oster gets loud when you turn the motor up all the way—much louder than the Vitamix but not as annoying or high-pitched as the Blendtec. For now, this is just the way it is with high-performance blenders.

Like the Vitamix, the Oster shuts off if the motor is in danger of overheating. If the Oster’s overload protection stops the motor, you should allow it to cool for 45 minutes and press the reset button on the bottom of the base before you run the blender again. This procedure reduces the risk of permanent motor burnout.

The Oster Versa passed almost every challenge we threw at it.

Should it burn out, the Oster comes with a limited seven-year warranty that covers “defects in material and workmanship,” including the motor and the Tritan jar. That policy is about the same as the coverage from Blendtec and Vitamix, which offer eight- and seven-year warranties, respectively, on their models. In our experience, Oster’s customer service is courteous and quickly addresses any issues with a blender while it’s under warranty.

But if you’re thinking that the Oster Versa will deliver the longevity and performance of a Vitamix 5200 at a fraction of the cost, think again. The Oster model’s biggest flaw is its durability: We found through personal experience that the Versa can burn out after two to three years of moderate to frequent use (see our long-term test notes for this model below). We’ve seen some reviews on Amazon (as well as comments from our readers) that mention the same problem. But Oster honors its seven-year warranty and is quick to send a replacement (we got ours in about a week). Although it took three attempts for us to get through to customer service by phone during the busy holiday shopping season, we’re assuming that hiccup was due to the unusually high call volume that occurs at that time of year.

The blending jar, lid, and controls on the Oster also feel cheaper compared with what you get on the Vitamix. But given that this blender is typically almost $250 less, we’re comfortable with the lower-quality hardware.

Long-term test notes

For three years, we used the Versa twice a week on average to make smoothies and soup, and it never quit on us during that time—although we occasionally detected a faint burning smell from the motor while we were blending thick smoothies. But the motor permanently died when we formally tested the three-year-old Versa again for our 2017 update: One minute into our blending the nut butter, the overload protection cut the motor. We should’ve let the motor rest for 45 minutes before restarting, but we let it cool for only 10 minutes before our second attempt—and that’s when the motor burned out completely. However, our blender was still under warranty, and Oster quickly sent a replacement.

Wirecutter’s audience development manager, Erin Price, uses the Oster Versa and so far has no complaints. She told us: “I’ve had the Oster Versa since 2016, and it’s still going strong (though it sat in storage for one of those years). I mostly use it for smoothies, and it handles ice and greens so well.”

Also great: Cleanblend Blender

A Cleanblend Blender on a counter next to smoothie ingredients that are on a cutting board.

If you’re willing to take a chance on a shorter warranty from a newer company, the 1,800-watt Cleanblend Blender costs about the same as the Oster Versa and produces finer purees. In our tests, it blended silkier smoothies and piña coladas than many blenders that cost more than twice as much. This model comes with a durable Tritan-plastic jar and a tamper for you to help move thick mixtures while it’s blending. The Cleanblend doesn’t have any preset buttons, and its variable speeds aren’t as nuanced as those of the Vitamix, but its interface is simple and intuitive to use. Judging from our long-term testing, the Cleanblend’s motor is durable and able to handle tough jobs like nut butter better than the Oster. It’s also backed by a complete five-year warranty.

The Cleanblend made some of the smoothest smoothies in our tests, performing better than the Oster and even the Vitamix in that regard. When we strained the Cleanblend’s kale and berry smoothie, barely any raspberry seeds remained in our fine-mesh sieve; the only blender that did better was the Blendtec. The Cleanblend also came in second, behind the Blendtec, in blending a silky-smooth piña colada. We’re talking restaurant-worthy blended drinks here.

For blending other things, the Cleanblend has a few limitations. It doesn’t have as wide a range of speeds as the Oster or the Vitamix, and it kicks into high gear even at the 1 setting, which in our soup test sent hot liquid shooting up to the lid. Although the Cleanblend was better at making mayonnaise than the Oster, this model’s motor also seemed to produce a lot of heat; its mayo was noticeably warm. Like our other picks (except the KitchenAid, our budget pick), the Cleanblend comes with a tamper, but the bat is a little short. Although it works fine for most tasks, don’t attempt to make nut butter from fewer than 2 cups of nuts, because the shorter tamper won’t reach the mixture once the nuts are finely ground.

The Cleanblend made some of the smoothest smoothies in our tests.

Over our long-term testing, the Cleanblend’s motor has seemed more durable than the Oster’s, though we’re not sure it’s a match for the motor of the time-tested Vitamix. In our 2017 testing, our four-year-old Cleanblend and Vitamix blenders both powered through two rounds of nut butter without quitting. The same test fried our three-year-old Oster. That said, Oster offers a seven-year warranty on the Versa Pro Series Blender, but Cleanblend offers only a five-year total warranty.

For an extra $75, you can extend the warranty on your Cleanblend Blender to a total of 10 years. This is a great value when you consider that the blender, including the decade of coverage, still costs about $200 less than a Vitamix. If you’re looking for the all-around great performance of a Vitamix for less than half the cost, you won’t find that here (or anywhere else for that matter), but the Cleanblend is a good value when you compare the numbers.

However, Cleanblend’s customer service is reachable only by email or a form on its website, and that might not inspire confidence in some people. Both Vitamix and Oster have a customer service phone number that connects you to a representative. Even though the Cleanblend seems more durable than the Oster, Cleanblend is such a new company that we’re not yet confident in its blender’s long-term reliability.

The Cleanblend’s base takes up 9½ by 8 inches of counter space, about the same as our other high-performance picks (our budget pick, the KitchenAid, is smaller). And at 19 inches high to the top of the lid, the Cleanblend is taller than the Oster, but it has just slightly more clearance under most kitchen cabinets than the Vitamix (which measures closer to 20 inches). Also, like all of the other high-performance blenders we tested, the Cleanblend is loud. But compared with the Ninja Chef’s thunderous roar and the Blendtec’s high-pitched whine, the Cleanblend’s sound is far easier on the ears.

Long-term test notes

Senior staff writer Michael Sullivan has used an older version of the Cleanblend at home for about four years and says he has never had an issue with it. He pulls it out about six times a month to make smoothies, sauces, soup, or occasionally emulsifications like mayonnaise. He has even crushed ice in it a few times, and he says that so far it has never stalled out.

Sabrina Imbler, a Wirecutter staff writer at the time of our tests, used the Cleanblend in her home for more than a year. She used it three to four times a week and never experienced stalling or burnout. She told us: “[My] only minor complaint is that sometimes the blender rattles a bit on top of the base, which makes me a little wary, but otherwise it’s great. I only use it for smoothies and mixed drinks, never any kind of nuts, but it pulverizes ice pretty quick. It’s also the perfect size for two smoothies. I tend to use the middle range of speeds, as I rarely need the highest, and the lowest is less effective for my needs. And I really like that it’s a dial as opposed to number buttons—easier to [crank] up if my stuff isn’t blending fast.”

Budget pick: KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender

A KitchenAid K150 blender shown filled with a pineapple smoothie on a kitchen counter.

If you blend only the occasional smoothie, daiquiri, or soup, you don’t need an expensive high-powered blender. The KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender will serve your needs. Offering a low profile and a 48-ounce blending jar, this blender is the most compact of all our picks. In our tests, the K150 proved adequate at blending thick smoothies, but not without a couple of stops and starts or our having to add a little more liquid to get a consistent vortex going. It can’t puree tough berry seeds as our top pick can, nor can it produce such velvety-smooth frozen drinks. However, the K150 has a mighty motor for the price and will handle most simple blending tasks.

The KitchenAid K150 offers three speeds plus a pulse setting for crushing ice. For frozen drinks and smoothies, the second speed seems to be the sweet spot, as that’s where we encountered the fewest air pockets. As with most blenders at this price, you need to add more liquid to get smoothies and frozen drinks to blend with a continuous vortex; otherwise, you need to stop it a couple of times to break up air pockets. Overall, we were satisfied with the drinks we made in the K150. The piña colada was a little icy but not offensive, and the smoothie was what we’d expect from a good $100 blender: very drinkable, with whole berry seeds and tiny flecks of kale.

When you turn the K150 on, the blades automatically start slow and ramp up to the set speed, a feature that’s great for safely blending hot liquids like pureed soups. But it’s still important that you take precautions when blending hot foods, such as starting on low speed and securing the lid with a folded dish towel.

We were pleasantly surprised that the K150 let us make a small batch of mayonnaise from one egg yolk and half a cup of oil. We didn’t think the jar’s wide square base and relatively short blade span would allow us to emulsify such a small volume.

As its name indicates, the KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender does crush ice. We’re not talking professional-grade fluffy shaved ice, but it’ll do the trick if you want to make a few snow cones on a hot summer day.

The K150 is lightweight and compact—perfect for people who want to store their blender in a cabinet. It also has a low profile (15 inches) that allows it to fit easily in the standard clearance between kitchen countertops and upper cabinets (18 inches). But the pitcher is on the small side at 48 ounces, and it lacks the comfy rubber-clad handle on our other picks.

As an alternative to buying this blender as is (base, 48-ounce jar, and lid), you can get it bundled with two personal blending cups for around $50 more. We haven’t tested the personal blending cups yet, but we’ll give them a try soon and report back. KitchenAid also plans to release a version of the K150 with a glass blending jar, though we prefer plastic blender jars for their durability.

At this writing the K150 seems to have some stock issues post–Black Friday shopping. We’re told that stock should be replenished some time in January 2021 in a broader range of colors. The KitchenAid K150 comes with a one-year warranty that excludes accidents, drops, misuse, and abuse.

Long-term test notes

Wirecutter staff writer Sarah Bogdan has the K150, and she and her roommate use it a few times a month for smoothies. She says that it blends fruits just fine, but she wishes that it got a finer blend with the vegetables she adds like kale and spinach. However, her roommate who sticks to peanut butter, bananas, and protein powder has no issues with it. It’s been a little difficult to clean, but she also realizes that’s true of any full-size blender.

Blender care and maintenance

If you find that your blender is having a difficult time processing ingredients, don’t be afraid to be aggressive (within reason) with the tamper to get the mixture moving around the blades. Also, make sure the blender jar is at least 25% full. Although high speeds will help process smoother mixtures, a lower speed (PDF) may also help ingredients start circulating if they just aren’t moving. When you’re following a recipe, it’s also good to add ingredients in the order listed; blender recipe books tend to be specific with the order (Vitamix, for example, generally lists ice as the last ingredient).

To limit the risk of hot liquids shooting out the top of a blending jar, always start on a low setting and slowly increase the speed (in general, presets do this automatically). Never fill the jar past the hot-liquid fill line. And for good measure, to limit the risk of the lid popping off, place a dish towel over the lid, with your hand firmly holding the lid down, while you blend.

Hand wash the blending jar with warm, soapy water rather than running it through the dishwasher. This will help extend the life of the jar. In our own testing, we found that the best way to clean a blender jar is to use a bottle brush or a scrub brush; processing water and a little soap in the blender jar will help loosen up tough ingredients such as peanut butter, and the brush should do the rest.

The competition

Compared with our top pick, the Vitamix 5200, the Vitamix 5300 has the same 64-ounce capacity and speed-control dial, but it lacks the ultra-high-speed switch available on the 5200. It has a slightly higher peak horsepower, but any extra power is negated by the shape of the jar. In testing, we found that the 5300’s relatively squat jar failed to maintain a vortex as well as the 5200’s narrow, tapered one. Also, for smaller volumes—2 cups or less—the 5300’s tamper didn’t reach down quite far enough to burst air pockets. We had to add more liquid to thicker mixtures, such as date puree and hummus, because the tamper wasn’t cutting it.

The Vitamix Explorian E320, available at Costco, is 99% identical to the 5300. A Vitamix customer service representative told us that the two blenders had the same motor base, jar, tamper, and functionality. The main difference between the blenders is that the 5300 has a small on/off switch located just below the control panel. On top of that, the E320 is available only as part of a package with two personal cups and an adapter.

Vitamix added the Explorian Series E310 variable-speed blender to its lineup in 2017. We chose not to test this model because we didn’t think it was a good value. Although it’s typically three-quarters the price of the Vitamix 5200, the cost difference is directly proportional to the E310’s smaller blending jar (48 ounces versus 64 ounces) and shorter warranty (five versus seven years). On the E310, Vitamix also replaced the switch that flips the machine from variable speed to high power with a pulse switch, thus eliminating the option for one-touch high-power blending. If you have limited storage space in your kitchen, you might like the E310 for its shorter height (about 17 inches tall, compared with the Vitamix 5200, which is about 20 inches tall). But if you’re going to shell out the cash for a Vitamix blender, we still think spending a little more on the 5200 is the best choice.

We bid a somber adieu to two near-identical former budget picks from KitchenAid: the 5-Speed Classic blender (still available refurbished as of May 2021) and the Diamond 5-Speed blender. The 5-Speed Classic was our budget pick for nearly five years before KitchenAid discontinued it and replaced it with the Diamond 5-Speed in 2019. In 2020, the company replaced the Diamond 5-Speed with the K150, our current budget pick. Buying the 5-Speed Classic refurbished isn’t a bad option if you want to save a little money, but keep in mind that it only comes with a 6-month warranty.

The KitchenAid K400 blender is more powerful than the KitchenAid K150 (our budget pick) but not enough to warrant its $150-plus price jump. And in our tests the K400 wasn’t nearly as good at blending fibrous kale as the less expensive Oster and Cleanblend blenders.

The KitchenAid Pro Line Series Blender is expensive, and it’s also the heaviest blender we’ve tested (22 pounds). In our tests it blended silky-smooth textures, though not quite as easily as the Vitamix 5200, but it didn’t do well at emulsification. While its performance intrigued us, after a year of long-term testing this model, we found that it delivered results similar to those of the Vitamix. And the heft and size of this KitchenAid model make it a difficult-to-move space hog.

Will the Blendtec Designer 675 blend? Yes, but not as well as our top picks. Despite Blendtec’s clever (if at times mildly sinister) video marketing campaign of blending everything from rake handles to iPhones, we’ve found its blenders wanting (we also tested the Total model in 2012). Although in our tests the Designer 675 killed it in making smoothies and blended drinks, its lack of a tamper limits its usefulness. It failed to make peanut butter (a tamper would have helped), and the preset speed for soup was frightening, with hot liquid flying wildly around the jar. We do think this particular model is quite beautiful, with a sleek black, illuminated base. It’s a great blender if you want something that looks slick on your counter and can make amazingly smooth mixed drinks and smoothies. But we think a blender that’s this expensive should perform well at more than just those two tasks. For more on how the Blendtec stacks up against the Vitamix 5200, read our article about testing the two blenders head-to-head.

We tested the Blendtec Total Blender for our 2012 review but found that it couldn’t compete with the Vitamix we tested at the time. The lid felt flimsy, and this model’s panel controls seemed cheap.

The Breville Super Q is a performance blender that’s packed with bells and whistles. In our tests, with its squat jar and powerful motor, the Super Q performed a lot like the Blendtec Designer 675, throwing smoothie up the sides and into the lid. At one point, the Breville shot bits of a smoothie in my face when I opened the cap to add more liquid. The Super Q pulverizes tough foods, but the Vitamix also does that for less money—and with less drama inside the jar. The Super Q also generated a lot of heat when we made peanut butter—so much that we had to stop the test early when we noticed steam coming out of the jar. Although the Super Q blended the silkiest piña coladas and came with lots of extra goodies (a 68-ounce jar, a personal blending jar, preset blending programs, and a vacuum attachment that’s supposed to slow the oxidation of raw foods), we don’t think it’s worth the $100-plus over the Vitamix’s price, especially since most of those goodies would just clutter your cabinets.

In our tests, the Cuisinart CBT-1500 Hurricane struggled to process foods. Blending thick smoothies and peanut butter required adding more liquid, a lot of starting and stopping, and banging the jar on the counter. It did make mayonnaise on the first try, though, unlike the more powerful Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro. But without the Turbo button of the Hurricane Pro (more on that below), this model is just another middle-of-the-road blender.

The Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro performed similarly to the Cuisinart CBT-1500 Hurricane, except it didn’t make mayonnaise as well (we achieved emulsification on the third try only). We did find the Turbo button useful for creating a fine puree. But again, without a tamper to burst air pockets, this blender needed a lot of tending to produce uniform, smooth purees.

The Ninja Chef CT800 1,500-watt blender is the first high-performance model from this company that doesn’t have sets of blades throughout the jar. Instead, the Ninja Chef’s blades sit in the base of the jar, as in normal blenders. This model also performed better than its predecessors. But it was extremely loud, and our top picks—the Vitamix, the Oster, and the Cleanblend—still blended silkier smoothies in our tests.

For the price, the Ninja Master Prep Professional is a decent blender, but we don’t think it compares to any of our other picks. It did a surprisingly good job of making smoothies, mixing bean spread, and blending margaritas, but the design is terrible for making mayonnaise (the motor is top-mounted, so you can’t drizzle anything into the jar). The stacked blades are also dangerously sharp, making them difficult to clean. The Ninja Master Prep Professional comes with three blending jars in various sizes; we thought that it added up to too many parts and that they would just end up cluttering our cupboards. Overall, the machine felt really cheap.

The Ninja Professional Blender 1000 didn’t perform well. The green smoothies we made in this blender had a weird, confetti-like texture. And the mayo this model made was especially loose, which meant that it was whipping in too much air. Every time we ran this Ninja blender, we detected a strong, burning-motor smell. The jar was hard to get on the base, and the lid was tricky to clamp on. Also, the base was big, clunky, and cheap feeling.

The Instant Pot Ace 60 Cooking Blender is unique in that it has a heating element in its base, so it can both cook and puree foods (some high-powered blenders also claim to “cook” soup, but they do so only with friction). After performing extensive testing, we found that this seemingly nifty feature was impractical. We made a decent broccoli cheese soup and a smooth butternut squash puree, but we had to blend each one for longer than the programmed setting to get a creamy texture. And we were disappointed to discover that we couldn’t adjust the temperature or sauté in the machine, since the heating element doesn’t start if it doesn’t detect liquid in the jar. As such, the Ace doesn’t produce the same nuanced flavors that you’d get if you started with a little caramelization. The heating element also introduces another possible point of failure into a type of appliance that is already prone to burning out.

The Ace whipped up smooth peanut butter and did a slightly better job of pulverizing ice cubes and tough kale leaves than most of the budget-level blenders we’ve tested. But it’s huge and loud, and its glass jar is heavier and less durable than the Tritan plastic jars of our picks. The jar’s wide base also makes it difficult for the Ace to form a powerful vortex (instead flinging ingredients all over the jar).

The 1,800-watt Hamilton Beach Professional Blender performed well in our tests. When we used the manual speeds, the blender’s digital readout showed a countdown timer, which was helpful because the instruction manual advised against continuously running the motor for more than two minutes. But the preprogrammed settings didn’t effectively keep the mixture moving when air pockets occurred. In addition, the on/off buttons are angled upward at the top of the base and thus susceptible to food and grime buildup over time.

Источник: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-blender/

12 Best Protein Shakers (Review) In 2021

Last updated: 18 Feb 2020
blenderbottle classic loop top shaker

BlenderBottle Classic Loop Top Shaker

instashaker vortex mixer cup

InstaShaker Vortex Mixer Cup

contigo shake and go snap fit shaker bottle

Contigo Shake and Go Snap Fit Shaker Bottle

If you’re not prepping your gym time with a killer protein shake, then what are you even doing? Your protein shaker is like your right-hand man, your shield against fatigue, and your promise of a high caliber workout session that’s going to bring results. We’ve not only covered the top twelve shaker bottles, but we’ve also dug deep to solve all the problems that tend to pop up with them. We’ve researched the cream of the crop, detailed how to maintain them and buy the right one for your needs, and simplified the process as much as possible. You’re here for a better protein shake, so let’s hop into the best protein shakers available, and get you pumped up for your next workout.

The Best Protein Shaker

BlenderBottle Classic Loop Top Shaker

BlenderBottle is at it again with another stellar protein shaker. Their Classic Loop Top Shaker comes with a super simple design and a standard black-and-white color set. There are dozens of other variations available, but added colors might cost a few bucks extra here and there. The real magic of BlenderBottle, apart from the BPA-free construction, is the surgical grade stainless steel agitator that flawlessly mixes your protein shakes into a smooth, creamy state of perfection. You get a total of twenty-eight ounces of storage space, a design that’s built to sit in cup holders without rattling around, and a top rack dishwasher safe stamp of approval. Simple, inexpensive and effective.

Total of 28 oz of capacity

BPA and phthalate-free

Safe for top rack dishwasher use

Mixer ball made of surgical grade stainless steel

  • BrandBlender Bottle
  • ModelC00573
  • Weight6.4 ounces

BlenderBottle ProStak Protein Shaker

You can’t beat BlenderBottle, no matter how hard you try. They’ve engineered the very best gym shakers, and this inexpensive rendition of their famous lineup is a shining example to that fact. You get a leak-proof SureSeal cap with a flip-up spout, which has a high wall to prevent swaying and spilling. Pair that with the included protein powder jar that actually connects to the bottom of the shaker, and you’ve got an all-in-one travel station for your protein shake at the gym. Everything is BPA-free, phthalate-free, and completely safe to put in the dishwasher, making BlenderBottle ProStak one of the most durable and versatile protein shakers we’ve ever tested. If the basic steel gray style doesn’t suit your liking, you can always opt for one of their 20+ designs as well. Make sure you always keep it handy in your gym bag.

Total 22 oz capacity

Measurement markings

Interlocking jar attaches to the bottom

Leak-proof SureSeal cap

  • BrandBlender Bottle
  • ModelC01710
  • Weight8.5 ounces

Performa Perfect Protein Shaker (Movie Collection)

You’re not only given the option to choose from some of your favorite superheroes (we’re fans of The Punisher model), but you actually get to live with a superior protein shaker. Performa made Perfect Shaker (Movie Collection) completely shatter resistant, so a simple drop from the top of the dishwasher isn’t going to crack, split or pop any elements out of place. Combine that with their fantastic mixing technology, actionrod. That uses the force of motion with the agitator to create a piston that forces liquid in and out, keeping your protein shakes perfectly blended no matter what. You’ve got a leak-proof lid with a guarantee, as well as a completely BPA-free construction that’s 100% dishwasher safe. What’s not to love?

One dozen movie and TV franchise models to choose from

Completely shatter-proof barrel

Guaranteed to be completely leak-proof

Actionrod technology for better mixing

  • BrandPerfectShaker
  • ModelPSK1001/100/108
  • Weight1.6 ounces

BluePeak Protein Shaker Bottle

bluepeak protein shaker bottle
bluepeak protein shaker bottle

Trying to get his and hers set of protein shakers? We think it’s a romantic gesture, and BluePeak wants to make sure it goes off without a hitch. You get one black and one pink protein shaker with each purchase, both crafted out of a completely BPA-free durable plastic that’s extremely resistant to drops and scuffs. BluePeak stands out for their dual mixing technology, which includes an agitator ball, as well as a mixing grid to filter out any particles or clumps that haven’t been blended in properly. Each of these BluePeak Protein Shaker Bottles has a total of twenty ounces of capacity, and measurement markings that travel up to the sixteen-ounce mark. You’re hitting the gym with your lady, and you want to do it in style: BluePeak’s got your back.

Completely BPA-free

Dual mixing element keeps things smooth

Markings go up to 16 oz out of the 20 oz capacity

Two protein shakers per purchase

  • BrandBluePeak
  • Weight13 ounces

Homiguar Protein Shaker Bottle

This is a serious step-up in style, and Homiguar wastes no time getting right into the goods with this. The first thing you might notice is the peekaboo window into the contents of your shaker, so you can monitor how much you have left. I’ve personally chugged the last of my shake without realizing how low it was and it’s always a bummer, but that doesn’t have to happen anymore. Crafted out of stainless steel without a hint of BPA plastic, Homiguar Protein Shaker Bottle also features a fully leak-proof lid, and a nice lanyard loop on top to keep it by your side at all times.

Completely BPA-free stainless steel construction

Peekaboo window to see how much is left

Total of 28 oz capacity

Fully leak-proof lid

  • BrandHomiguar
  • Weight12 ounces

PROMIXX Stainless Steel Electric Protein Shaker

promixx stainless steel electric protein shaker
promixx stainless steel electric protein shaker

PROMIXX understands that you’re sick and tired of clumps and lumps in your protein shake. Admittedly, we’ve all grabbed those dollar store mixers and found that they haven’t worked, and we’ve been hit with a nasty powder bomb. PROMIXX Stainless Steel Electric Protein Shaker not only take all the hassle out of mixing but remain convenient. The base if rechargeable with a simple micro USB cord, so you can bring it with you and mix at the gym if you’d prefer. Everything is created without BPA or DEHP components, and all non-electric components are top rack dishwasher safe. No more hassle, no more clumpy protein shake.

BPA and DEHP-free design

Rechargeable base with a simple micro USB cord

Lightweight with a fairly quiet operation

Includes a one-year warranty straight from the manufacturer

  • BrandPromixx
  • Model4336315097
  • Weight14.1 ounces

To us, Hydra Cup Shaker Bottle is one of the most iconic styles we’ve seen at the gym constantly. Hydra Cup slays the game when it comes to style, but also functions far better than most inexpensive protein shaker models on the market. You get twenty-eight ounces of storage space, as well as a separate protein powder storage container included with your purchase. Your lid is 100% leak-proof, so if this knocks around in the cup holder or in the mesh pocket of your backpack, you can rest assured that it won’t leak a single drop. Zero BPA used during construction, crafted in the USA, and built to last.

Total of 28 oz capacity

BPA-free construction

Protein powder storage container included with purchase

Leak-proof lid won’t stop for anything

  • BrandHydra Cup
  • Weight1.6 ounces

InstaShaker Vortex Mixer Cup

You’ll see that there aren’t many electric shakers on this list, but InstaShaker’s Vortex model just can’t be ignored. Attach your 20 oz reservoir to the motorized base, flip on the switch, and watch some magic happen. You have a 16,000 RPM motor going to town on your mixture. That means no clumps, no lumps or powdered protein shake mix just sitting around. It’s named Vortex for a reason: it pulls everything down, blending it furiously in a thirty-second interval, promising you nothing but the smoothest shake every single time. The chamber is made of 100% BPA-free acrylic, promising superior quality and an easy-to-clean surface every single time. You’ll also get a one-year warranty on the motor and electric parts, so there’s relatively no risk in trying your hand at an electric protein shaker.

Fully electric base mixes your shake in thirty seconds

16,000 RPM motor promises no lumps or powder clusters

20 oz BPA-free container

Includes a one-year warranty on electrical components

  • BrandInstaShaker
  • Weight14.1 ounces

Bottled Joy Protein Shaker Bottle

The joy should be in the cup, but we’re getting pretty excited just by the exterior. Bottled Joy created a simple and inexpensive protein shaker, with over eight different aesthetic styles to choose from, as well as a fully BPA-free construction. The star of the show here is the contoured finger inlays on the outside of the shaker, giving you full control while holding it. That’s good because the flip-up lid is difficult to get open thanks to the 100% leak-proof guarantee. If this ends up hitting the passenger side floor in the car, it’s not going to cost you a hundred bucks in some lowbrow detailing. Last but not least, Bottled Joy Protein Shaker Bottle is super simple to clean inside and out.

Total of 27 oz of capacity

Completely leak-proof lid

Finger inlays on barrel for superior grip

BPA-free and FDA approved

  • BrandBOTTLED JOY
  • Weight6.4 ounces

Contigo Shake and Go Snap Fit Shaker Bottle

contigo shake and go snap fit shaker bottle
contigo shake and go snap fit shaker bottle

If you’ve been wondering how little you can spend while still getting a quality protein shaker, Contigo is your answer. This simple bottle comes with a mixer ball to keep things shaken up, as well as a leak-proof lid to ensure things don’t get too wild. There’s a simple flip-top spout on the top, and twenty-eight ounces of capacity to quench every bit of thirst at the gym. As our best value pick, you’re getting minimal brand logos and aesthetics, but a ton of functionality. Not concerned with how your protein shaker bottle looks to the others at the gym? If you answered yes, then Contigo is about to save you some money.

Easy snap-on lid

Includes mixer ball

Leak-proof lid

Total of 28 oz of capacity

  • BrandContigo
  • Model70290
  • Weight4.2 ounces

Grenade Shaker with Protein Compartment

It’s by a company called grenade, and apparently, they have an awesome sense of humor. This simple twenty-ounce protein shaker looks very militant and includes a high walled spout that gives you a little bit more room to shake things up. You’re also going to get an inclusive protein compartment, which hooks right onto the bottom of your shaker to extend its height. Pair all that with the dual mixing system, and you’ve got one hell of a shaker that gets major style points. Making this aesthetic didn’t come at any cost on quality, because Grenade made these BPA and DEHP-free, making Grenade Shake excellent for the dishwasher, microwave or freezer without having to worry about breakage.

Microwave and dishwasher safe (top rack)

BPA and DEHP-free

Includes a protein compartment with flawless attachment

Total 20 oz capacity

  • BrandGrenade
  • Model6740006
  • Weight1 pounds

Smartshake Original Shaker Cup

Last but not least, this simple approach deserves some credit. With Smartshake Original Shaker Cup you get the measurement markings on the side, you get a stellar look, but most importantly, you end up saving an absolute mad wad of cash while still getting excellent mixing power. There’s a fully leak-proof lid, which also comes with a lanyard loop if you’re hooking this onto the side of your backpack before heading to the gym. It’s also completely BPA and DEHP-free, so you won’t have to worry about a single thing during use. Those properties are a result of superior construction, which also makes this 1005 dishwasher safe (top rack only). SmartShake focused on simple aesthetics, so choose from one of five different colors, and get mixing.

Fully leak-proof lid and flip cover

Top rack dishwasher safe

BPA-free, DEHP-free and microwavable

20 oz capacity with markings up to the 12 oz line

  • Brandsmartshake
  • Model7350057181065
  • Weight5.3 ounces

Protein Shaker Buying Guide and FAQ

We showed you twelve of the best protein shakers ever made, but now we’re going to discuss why they’re so awesome, and go over the rules of maintaining them, and what you need to look for before committing to the purchase.

best protein shakers

How do We Choose Our Selection of Protein Shakers

Brand - Brand is a big factor here. You have companies that dedicate themselves to fitness and health products, and have already come through the trial and error phase. The good thing is that with protein shakers, you’re not looking at brand being a huge upcharge on the price tag.

Quality - Quality is difficult to measure, but when you take a look at locking mechanisms, anti-corrosion construction on manual mixer balls and a ton of other features, it all comes together as a full puzzle. Quality is alsop associated with brand. For instance, you aren’t going to see crummy versions of our top pick, BlenderBottle, because they consistently make excellent gym shakers.

Reviews - The voice of the people, users who’ve tested them for months, who use them every day, and every other variety of review you can think of. These help us determine our shortlist before actually purchasing and testing products. They play a big role in determining what’s worth our time, and what isn’t worth a dime.

Price - Price is always going to be a factor. Fortunately, most protein shaker bottles are relatively inexpensive, and won’t cost you more than an hour of wage to get a really high-quality one.

best protein shakers

Features to Look for in Protein Shakers

Capacity - This is all going to depend on how hard you plan on going to the gym, and the volume of protein shake that you’re going to need. You’ll see a common theme of 24 oz and 32 oz bottles, which are perfect for most protein shakes.

Mixing System - Whether it’s an electric mixer or a simple metal mixer ball, the mixing system is going to be the key here. Personally, we prefer manual mixer balls to help give it a more thorough, smooth texture and taste.

Tight Seal - It’s a shaker, meaning you’re going to shake it before drinking it just about every single time. You want a tight seal, or it’s not worth your time and money.

Materials - You’re predominately going to see different grades of plastic. The only thing you need to be on the lookout for, is ensuring that whichever gym shaker you have your heart set on is BPA-free, and you should be fine.

Manual vs. Battery Operated - This is about preference, but it’s also about function. If you go with an electric unit, just know that even the best shaker bottle can run into problems, and then you’ll have to go manual. If you want to save money in the first place and have a more hands-on feel to your protein shake, stick with the manual from the start.

Portability - You’ll be looking for lanyard loops on the lid, an ergonomic grip or finger inlays to make sipping easier, and a diameter/size that can fit in the mesh pocket of a backpack or a cup holder at the very least. If it’s not portable, you’re also going to have a hard time finding somewhere to place it down in the gym.

best protein shakers

Protein Shaker FAQ

Q: What is a Protein Shaker?

A: A protein shaker is an enhanced plastic bottle that’s intended to go with you to the gym. It normally includes a very tight-fitting cap, a drinking spout of some sort, and most importantly, a mixer ball for the interior to help keep your drinks nice and smooth. Protein powder and other protein shake meal replacements often clump up if they’ve been sitting there for a bit, and the mixer ball is your ticket to revitalizing the smoothness of your shake.

Q: Can I Mix Warm Liquids in my Protein Shaker?

A: You absolutely can, so long as you follow one simple guideline. Don’t add boiling water into your protein shaker. Even though most plastics are made completely BPA-free, plastic is just a really hardened and condensed oil. Adding boiling water can extract elements out of the plastic and dissolve it into your food, which is really not good for your health. So long as you try to stay under a threshold of 200 F (which is easy), you can add warm liquids to your shaker.

Q: How do I Get Rid of the Smell of my Protein Shaker?

A: Whether milk, protein powder or added ingredients have given your gym shaker a funky smell, there’s an insanely simple way to take care of it. You have to think that if you have a manual shaker, the metal mixer in the middle can scratch up the inside of the shaker. If you stir it with a metal spoon or fork, you could scratch up the inside. This creates micro divots that can hold onto trace elements of bacteria, protein powder and milk. Sounds gross, but this is how you fix it.

Get one full cup of distilled white vinegar. Place it in your protein shaker, then add two teaspoons of baking soda (preferably from a freshly opened container), and fill the rest with water. Vinegar is a natural sterilizing agent, and will work to remove particles. You’ll want to rinse this out thoroughly after leaving it to sit for a few hours, because now you’re going to have a vinegar scent. Run it through a cycle in the dishwasher and it’ll come out with no scent at all.

best protein shakers

Q: Can I Wash my Protein Shaker in the Dishwasher?

A: Most protein shakers are made with durable plastic that can withstand the dishwasher, so long as you put it on the top rack. However, this won’t always be your best bet to clean it. Even if you have a fairly high-end new dishwasher, morsels of protein powder that caked to the inside of your manual protein shaker may still remain. It’s important to give it a thorough rinse, and run your hand along the inside of the container before putting it in the dishwasher, (or just washing it by hand to be doubly certain).

Check the instruction packet that came with your shaker. You should have received a folded up square piece of paper in your shaker that states maintenance and care requirements. For certainty, wash by hand. If that’s not how you do things, be sure that the model you’re looking at is dishwasher safe before you commit to the purchase.

Q: How do I Make the Best Protein Shake Ever?

A: We’ll be the first to admit that there’s a ton of protein powders and formulas out there that look good on paper, but frankly just don’t entice your taste buds. Let’s fix that. We’ve got a few hacks that you can use on a whim to help modify and augment your protein shake, and get the most out of your gym shaker at the same time.

  1. Instead of using water as the instructions might deem, use 2% or skim milk to achieve a better all-around flavor palette. This adds a richer texture to the mixture, but if that texture is a bit too smooth for you, our next tip will help.
  2. Cut like you’ve never cut before. If you’re using six ounces of milk or water with your powder and it comes out tasting too thick or smooth, bounce up to eight ounces, and so on. Think of it as adding a shot of milk or water (two ounces) every single time to flavor is off to you. So long as you consume the whole drink, the worst thing that happens is you get more thorough hydration. It doesn’t diminish the quality of the protein powder.
  3. Add fresh fruit. Is it going to be a smooth and simple drink? Not exactly, but the natural sugars in pineapple, strawberries and blueberries will enrich the flavor, while changing up the texture. Plus, if you don’t get enough fruits during the week, this is the perfect way to kill two birds with one stone.
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Источник: https://www.instash.com/best-protein-shaker/

What is Autoclaving?

Autoclaving is a sterilization method that uses high-pressure steam. The autoclaving process works by the concept that the boiling point of water (or steam) increases when it is under pressure.

 

 

Image result for autoclave historyHistory of the Autoclave

The name “Autoclave” comes from Greek “auto” ultimately meaning self, and Latin “clavis” meaning key, thus a self-locking device.

 

The first autoclave was essentially a pressure cooker and was originally invented as a method for preparing food by French physician Denis Papin around 1681. He called his invention a "steam digester" and described benefits of using the device to process food for easier digestion. 

 

Charles Chamberland.jpg

The autoclave was re-invented for medical and scientific use by Charles Chamberland in 1879. Chamberland was a microbiologist who worked with Louis Pasteur.  By chance, he came up with a vaccine for chicken cholera. He went away on holiday, forgetting to inject the disease into some chickens. When he came back he saw the jar of bacteria still there and decided to inject it into the chickens anyway. To his amazement they did not die. When he reported this to Pasteur, he was told to inject a fresh form into the same chickens. Those chickens did not die. He had found a vaccine. This team also discovered that a weakened form of a disease can act as a vaccine.

 

 

How an Autoclave Works

Items to be autoclaved are subjected to gradual temperature increases under high pressure until 121 °C is reached and then steamed for around 15–20 minutes.

 

The autoclave allows steam to flow around items in the chamber. The length of time and temperature necessary for sterilization depend on the items to be sterilized and whether they are wrapped or left directly exposed to the steam. Items should be separated to allow the steam to penetrate the load evenly. The steam can reach in small crevices and can kill all bacteria, viruses and bacterial spores.

 

When to Autoclave

Autoclaves can be used to eliminate microorganisms, cure composites, vulcanize rubber, and for hydrothermal synthesis. Autoclaving is a very dependable method for the sterilization and decontamination of laboratory glassware, medical instruments and waste, reagents, and other media. Autoclaves can inactivate fungi, bacteria, spores, viruses and other microorganisms on surgical instruments such as scalpels, forceps, scissors and other metal items.

 

 

Why Autoclaving is Good for the Environment

Because autoclaving sterilizes without the use of reagents and allows for the re-use of lab equipment and supplies, it is environmentally friendly. It can be used to sterilize medical waste before disposal, eliminating environmental concerns regarding incinerators.

 

 

What Qorpak containers are Autoclavable?

Glass bottles are generally safe for autoclaving but some caps may not be autoclavable. 

 

Autoclavable products include:

·         Rubber Lined Phenolic Caps

·         Polypropylene Hole Caps with Bonded Septa

·         Unlined Polypropylene Caps with or without PTFE Disc Liners

·         Glass Bottles

·         Polypropylene Jars

 

Precautions

Closures should be autoclaved separately or very loosely on top of container; otherwise a vacuum is created during cooling. Liners will get sucked into the container or bottles and caps can crack or warp. Expanding vapors during heating can also cause containers to crack or explode without sufficient ventilation.

 

This method of sterilization should not be used if the material to be sterilized can be damaged by heat or moisture. Plastic resins that cannot be autoclaved include PET, PETG, LDPE, and HDPE, PET, PETG.

Paper products like paper and some plastic resins cannot be autoclaved due to the moist heat.

 

 

 

 

Источник: https://www.qorpak.com/pages/autoclaving

The Best Way To Store Flax & Chia Seeds

How To Store Flax Chia Seeds

Superfoods, like chia seeds, flax seeds, goji berries and more, are becoming commonplace in kitchens across the world. Now that we all know what they are and why we should eat them, it’s time to learn how to store them properly.

The BEST way to store flax and chia seeds – and all superfoods – is in a glass mason jar in the refrigerator.

It sounds simple, but storing your superfoods this way is super important. Here’s why:

1. Easy Access: You can see what you have and how much you have left.

Too many opaque containers get pushed to the back of the refrigerator, and you might not even know they’re there. Storing them in a see-through container means you’ll use more of them, more often.

Tip: use a label or masking tape to add the name and expiration date to the lid if there’s a chance you won’t use it by the expiration date or if you might forget what’s in the jar.

2. Extended shelf life: Nuts and seeds contain delicate oils, and those oils can quickly spoil.

Storing them in the refrigerator will extend their shelf life; this will save you money in the long run. Mason jars can also be sealed tightly, which keeps the air out and helps prevent oxidation. Throwing away expired food is sad for everyone.

Note: If your superfoods came in a package on the shelf – flax and chia seeds often are – that’s perfectly fine. Some companies vacuum seal their packages to store at room temperature to be shelf-stable. Just store it in the refrigerator after you open them.

3. Fewer dishes: Most of these superfoods are easy to pour out of the jar; fewer scoops and spoons mean fewer dishes.

Sprinking your favorite superfoods onto salads and into the blender with your smoothie ingredients has never been easier. Use the lid as a guide if you have a heavy pouring hand.

4. They’re inexpensive: Mason jars are inexpensive and can be found online or at a hardware store.

I’ve found them in packs of 12 for less than a dollar each. Bonus! They also make excellent drinking glasses and flower vases. You can store your green drinks in them, too.

5. They’re good for the environment: Glass jars are reusable and last forever.

Plus, glass is non-reactive, so you can feel good about storing food in them for long periods of time.

Tip: Mason jar companies now make BPA-free plastic lids that are cheap and are a little easier to open than the traditional metal canning lids. The metal canning lids can also rust after multiple uses, so these new white lids are awesome. I found them at my local hardware store for just a few dollars.

Here are a few of the superfoods that are always find in mason jars in my refrigerator:

  • Raw almonds
  • Raw hemp seeds
  • Ground flaxseeds
  • Raw sunflower seeds
  • Cacao (raw cocoa powder)
  • Chia seeds
  • Dried goji berries

And once you master the basics above, here are nine more superfoods that you can try.

Happy superfood shopping!

Источник: https://www.elizabethrider.com/best-way-to-store-flax-chia-seeds/

Common Washing Machine Problems

If you have a problem with your washing machine we'll help you identify the fault and give you advice on how to repair it.

 

Before diving into diagnosing your specific fault, it's worth taking a minute to study the anatomy of a washing machine and familiarise yourself with the inner components and their location; it will help fault finding and repair.

For example, an unusual noise coming from the lower right area of the washing machine would suggest that something is stuck in the pump filter; perhaps a foreign object such as a coin is catching on the pump implellor.  A leak from the back right hand corner of your washing machine could mean a problem with the waste hose, and would be a good place to start looking.

Of course not all washing machines are put together in exactly the same way, but the laws of physics and mechanical engineering means that they all follow a similar theme.

The pump will always be found at the bottom of the machine because they are gravity fed by design.  On a belt driven washing machine (99% of all washing machines) the belt and pulley will be located at the rear of the tub.  And, Just below, you will find the motor, that drives the drum via the belt.  Any electronics will tend to be up above the water line for obvious reasons.  Once you begin to look at the inner workings of a washing machine it will quickly become logical why components have been fitted where they are!


This fault can leave you wondering if your washing machine is beyond economical repair; when you turn your washing machine on it does nothing!

More often than not the problem is easily fixed at no cost, or by replacing an inexpensive part.

Check the power to the washing machine

Don't skip this part ...

Remember that the power starts at the consumer unit (fuse box); make sure that a fuse hasn't tripped.

Next, check the plug socket; the best way to confirm that there isn't a fault with the plug socket is to plug another electrical appliance such as the kettle to see if it boils as it should.

If all is ok with the consumer unit and the socket next you now need to confirm the wiring to the plug looks good and there are no kinks or breaks in the wire, and check that the fuse in the plug is ok.

Check the washing machine door

Again, often overlooked but it's a simple mistake to make.  Check your washing machine door is closed and closed properly.  All washing machines have what's known as a door interlock.  It is designed to stop the door from being opened when the machine is switched on, and unless the door of your washing machine is fully closed and latched, it won’t start.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to turn on

Faulty Door Interlock (most likely fault)

As mentioned above, washing machines won’t start if the door isn’t properly locked (or isn’t registered by the machine as correctly locked). As a result, a faulty door interlock could prevent the machine from starting. Watch the following video for a step by step guide on:

How To Replace A Faulty Door Interlock?

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace your faulty door interlock

Faulty On/Off Switch (relatively rare fault)

It is possible that the on/off switch is faulty and will need replacing.

Faulty Module Circuit Board (relatively rare fault)

A faulty module circuit board could prevent your washing machine from turning on – in this case; you will need to get it professionally repaired.  This is the least likely component to fail, but they do fail from time to time.

Faulty Suppressor (least likely fault)

The interference suppressor is normally situated internally at the point where the power lead enters the washing machine.  It is designed to eliminate interference between electrical items.  If this 'blows' then your washing machine will not work at all.


This fault can appear similar to that in the above section, 'Why won't my washing machine turn on'.  With this fault, power will be getting to the valves, but water won't be entering the washing machine.

Check the washing machine inlet hose/s

By far the most common cause of a washing machine not filling is kinked inlet hoses.  You will need to gain access to the rear of the washing machine and check that the hoses aren't trapped or kinked.

Check the water taps (plumbing)

With access to the rear of the washing machine, you can now check that the water taps are turned on.  If you suspect a problem with your water supply, turn off the water taps, and disconnect the inlet hoses from the washing machine.  Place the inlet hoses in a bucket and then turn on the water taps.  You will want to see water to flow out under pressure to confirm that the water supply is ok.

Check washing machine inlet valve filters

If your washing machine is filling, but very slowly, check the inlet valve filters aren't clogged with debris.  Turn off the water taps, disconnect the hose/s from the washing machine, and the valve filters will be visible.  They can be removed with a pair of long nose pliers and cleaned if necessary.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to fill

Faulty Inlet Hose (Most likely fault)

If you identify an inlet hose to be kinked, then it will most likely need to be replaced.  If you don't, it will quickly become kinked again once the washing machine is back in position.

Faulty Inlet Valves (Likely fault)

Check at the back of the machine where the inlet hose screws on to the inlet valve.  If the water supply is ok and you can hear a humming noise from the water inlet valve/s then it is likely they are faulty and will need replacing.

How To Replace A Faulty Inlet Valve?

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace a washing machine inlet valve


This fault can be disastrous and requires immediate attention.  If you are lucky you will catch it early; you will come to load your washing machine with clothes and notice that the drum has water in it.  The problem will lie with the washing machine inlet valve, and you should replace it ASAP.  While waiting for the replacement part ensure that you turn the taps off when the washing machine is not in use.

You'll probably first notice this fault when you return to your washing machine to remove a load of washing and the clothes inside are soaking wet.  The cause is simple; the washing machine has completed it's program without spinning the clothes at the end.

Check the load

First, you should check the size of the load that is in the washing machine.  Too little clothes in a washing machine can be just as problematic as too many.  There needs to be just the right amount of clothes so that when the washing machine spins, they are evenly distributed around the drum ensuring balance.  The control module will detect a drum that is out of balance, and the washing machine will stop to prevent any damage occurring. Just adjust the size of your load and select a spin cycle again.  If your washing machine spins without any problem, then it was 'out of balance' that caused the problem.

Check the washing machine belt

It is possible that the washing machine belt has worked its way off the motor/pully.  A simple check is to open the door and turn the drum with your hand.  If the drum rotates VERY freely without any resistance, then it is likely that the belt has become detached.
If you can feel some resistance, which is the belt turning the motor, then the belt is still correct in place

Check the wash cycle

Having followed the steps above it is now likely that the fault isn't just affecting the spin cycle.  Select your regular wash cycle and switch on the machine.  It should fill up with water, and the drum should eventually start turning back and forth washing machine the clothes.  If the drum sits idle, then the fault will likely be the motor carbon brushes, the motor, or the motor control module.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to turn or spin

Broken or snapped belt (Most likely)

As mentioned above, if the washing machine drum rotates by hand VERY freely then the belt is likely to be the cause of the problem.

How to replace the belt on a washing machine.

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace the belt on a washing machine.

Faulty or worn washing machine carbon brushes

Carbon brushes are in constant contact with the moving part of the motor, so they get worn down over time and will eventually need replacing.

How to replace carbon brushes on a washing machine

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace carbon brushes on a washing machine.

Faulty motor control module (least likely)

A defective module circuit board can prevent the motor from turning the drum.  If suspected then you should seek the services of a trained appliance repair specialist.

Faulty motor (uncommon)

Faults with the motor are uncommon, however they do occur.  If suspected then you should seek the services of a trained appliance repair specialist.


A washing machine that has sprung a leak is a fault that ranges in severity, from a minor dribble to an all-out flood.  Usually, leaks can be fixed yourself at little or no cost; you just need to have a methodical approach to finding the source.

Start looking on the outside of the washing machine

Before you start removing the washing machine lid and rear panel first take some time to see if there are signs of water on the outside of the washing machine.

Check the water inlet taps and hoses

The area to start your investigation is at the rear of the washing machine where the water inlet hoses are attached.  With the washing machine running check for water at each end of the inlet hoses.

Washing machine waste pipe blocked?

A common problem in hard water areas where a build-up of limescale can cause blockages in your waste pipe restricting the flow of water to the drain.  Water will back up and overflow the waste pipe causing flooding.  Check the wall area around the waste pipe for signs of water.

Check the soap dispenser

A build-up of powder detergent in the hose that runs from the soap dispenser to the tub will eventually cause a blockage and water would back up and flood from the soap dispenser drawer.

Check the washing machine door

A common area for leaks is the washing machine door.  If it appears that water is coming from the door, check the door seal for signs of damage or perishing.

Check the door glass; a build-up of limescale on the glass will mean that the door isn’t forming a seal causing water to escape.

Check the washing machine filter

If your washing machine has a removable filter, you will almost certainly find it at the front bottom of your washing machine.  Sometimes it can be hidden behind the plinth.  A damaged or perished filter seal will be enough to cause a leak in this area.

Leaks from inside the washing machine

Once you have ruled out the leak is coming from outside of the washing machine it will be necessary to investigate the internal hoses and components.  First, it is a good idea to try and understand the approximate location of the leak.  To do this, you can spread some newspaper or cardboard underneath the washing machine, and then turn it on.  The position of the water leak will now be visible and give you a good idea of where to investigate first.

Check the pump and associated hoses

Leaks from the washing machine pump are relatively rare. However, a build of limescale can cause hoses and seals to perish.

Check the internal hoses and plastic components

Any component that is rubber or plastic has the potential to break down and cause a leak.  You will typically see a tell-tale sign that water has leaked around an area.

Nowadays washing machine tubs are constructed of plastic, not metal, and it is not uncommon for a foreign object, such as a coin, to get caught up between the drum and the tub sheering part of the plastic moulding.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine to leak

Perished or damaged washing machine door seal

Washing machine door seals are liable to become damaged, or perish, over time.

How to replace a washing machine door seal

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace a washing machine door seal

Damaged filter or filter seal

Carbon brushes are in constant contact with the moving part of the motor, so they get worn down over time and will eventually need replacing.

How to replace or clean the filter on a washing machine

Watch our DIY repair video on how to clean and replace the filter on a washing machine

Damaged washing machine drain hose

The plastic drain hose can become damaged if kinked during the installation of the washing machine.  It has also been known for mice to chew a hole in the washing machine drain hose.

Damaged washing machine inlet hose

Failure of the water inlet hoses can occur.  The rubber 'O' seal found at both ends of the hose can also fail and cause leaks.

Damaged internal hoses

Any rubber hose inside the washing machine can fail over time.

Damage to plastic tubs

Can occur if a foreign object such as a coin passes through the washing machine during a cycle.


Whether it’s a grinding noise, a knocking noise, or an intermittent noise you will want to investigate and repair the problem sooner rather than later.  Leaving it can lead to a much bigger problem to fix.

Noise from your washing machine pump

Noise coming from the pump area of your washing machine will typically mean that a foreign object, such as a coin, will have passed through the system and be caught in the filter.  Most pumps fitted to washing machines in recent years are an integral part of the filter housing (note: some washing machines don’t have filters at all).  Small foreign objects can pass into the filter by slipping through the gap between the outer tub and the rotating drum. Items such as pebbles, coins and small screws or nails - to name a few.

These items can then pass from the filter into the pump chamber where the pump’s impeller will ‘whiz’ the object around the chamber making a loud rattling noise - think blender, putting a screw in the blender’s container would give a similar effect.

The pump’s impeller rotates at a tremendous speed to expel the water from your washing machine. Consequently, there is strain put on this small part. The impeller will also have to cope with pushing small pieces of debris out along with the water. Mostly, the impeller will deal with what it is expected to do, but on occasions, it may come loose and begin to make a noise and is likely to break away all together eventually.

Noise from the drum area of the washing machine

Grinding noise from the drum during the wash and spin cycles usually suggest that the drum bearings have worn.  To check, turn the drum back and forth; movement should be smooth and easy with very little resistance or noise.  If you can hear or feel grinding then this is confirmation that your washing machine bearings have indeed worn.

If you suspect the drum bearings to be a problem, another quick way to indicate this is to look at the floor below your washing machine. If you find a black or brown patch, then remove the back cover of your washing machine and inspect the area just below the centre of your drum pulley. If the same coloured marks are streaking down the rear of the outer tub, this indicates that the drum bearing seal has worn or perished letting water enter and destroy the bearings.

Drum Shaft

The rotating drum is held in its position by a component called a drum support shaft or drum support spider consisting of three metal alloy arms and a steel shaft which protrudes through the drum bearings enabling the drum to rotate.
The arms attach to the rear of the drum at the points where the baffles are in place. Looking through the door to the back of the drum, you will observe three pressed shapes radiating from the centre to each baffle point - that’s where you will find the drum support shaft.

These shafts do shear, and the impact is immediate, the consequent noise is quite alarming for the simple fact that it is so sudden.  Just inside the door opening, hold the tub down with your fingers at the 6 o’clock, rotate the drum, so a baffle is at 12 o’clock, then push up the drum to see if you can detect a spongy movement of the drum.

This movement may be evident for one or maybe two arms. Another indication is when the drum rotates you might observe an apparent misalignment between the rotating drum and the static outer tub.

Foreign body caught between drum and tub

Another noise that is not uncommon is a coin or some other foreign object that has found it’s way between the outer tub and the drum. The unusual sound will likely be heard during the spin cycle when water is being forced out of the clothes and whipping up the foreign object/s. Bra wires are a favourite! Over time they work their way out of the garment and fit comfortably through the holes in the drum. They will make a distinct tinny rattle as they scrape against the rotating drum.

Noise from the motor

Worn motor bearings while less likely are possible; they are more difficult to isolate for the untrained ear as the sound is distinct.

If there is noticeable wear of the motor bearings, then one can attempt to distinguish between these or drum bearing noise by removing the back panel and taking the belt off the motor/drum pulleys. Rotate the drum to see if any sound indicating worn bearings is detected, if not, now rotate motor pulley for any signs of noticeable wear and noise.

Miscellaneous washing machine noise

Loose tub weight:

If you hear your washing machine begin to knock and you also find grey dust appearing under or around your washing machine, stop using it immediately.
There are usually two counterweights inside your washing machine designed to help balance the tub/drum during use.  You will find one on top of the tub, and one on the lower front of the tub.
Damage to either counterweight can cause severe damage, the tub weights are hefty and if they become loose or cracked they will rip away from the tub during spin cycle usually destroying their brackets and rendering your machine beyond economic repair.

Transit bolts or packaging not removed

If your machine is new and it begins to vibrate excessively to the point of moving, then consider checking that you, or the person that installed the washing machine, have removed the transit bolts and any internal packaging.
Check underneath your machine as often large pieces of polystyrene are placed there as part of the packaging to protect the motor and can easily be overlooked during installation.

Possible faulty components that cause washing machine noise

Damaged pump

Damage to the washing machine pump by foreign objects such as coins is a common problem.

How to replace a washing machine pump

Watch our DIY repair video on how to replace a washing machine pump

Worn washing machine drum bearings

Depending on use, washing machine bearings won't last forever.  In many modern washing machines drum bearings are now encased on sealed tubs and cannot be replaced.  In these cases the tub and drum would be replaced as one unit.

Damaged drum shaft spider

Although uncommon, drum shaft spiders do break down from time to time.

Worn motor

Noise because of a worn motor is a relatively uncommon fault.

Counterweights

Counterweights are constructed of concrete and can develope cracks due to vibration.


Firstly, don’t be tempted to force the door open!

Check if the washing machine is still full of water

If there is water in the drum, the washing machine door will remain locked.  Follow our step by step video guide to solving this problem:

Broken washing machine door handle

Broken door handles are a common fault.  If there is less resistance than usual when you pull or squeeze the handle to open the door, then the part of the door handle that moves the latch will have broken away.

Child lock engaged

Modern machines now have their wash programs selected electronically via a control module or power board depending on how the manufacturer describes the component.  More often they have a child lock function available to the user.  It is easy to select by mistake and is usually indicated by a lit ‘key’ symbol if your machine has a console display or a key symbol on your machine’s console panel with an indicator light adjacent to it. Refer to your instructions for your washing machine.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine door not to open

Broken door handle

Washing machine door handles are plastic and prone to wear and tear.

How to replace a washing machine door handle

Watch our DIY repair video on replacing the door handle on a washing machine

Faulty door interlock

The washing machine door interlock ensures that the door cannot be opened during a wash cycle.


Mouldy washing machine door seals are a bi-product of our attempt to reduce the carbon footprint, and rightly so!  If we can save the world from human destruction, who cares about a smelly, mouldy washing machine door seal?  Well, it turns out, lots of you do!
Remember in the olden days?  Mum and gran would do most of their washing once a week and would always include a boil wash; there was no such thing as a mouldy door seal in their day.

Today, by contrast, we wash much more often at much lower temperatures, and this is is the reason why we have smelly, mouldy washing machines.

What Causes Black Mould to Appear On Door Seals

The root of the problem is a build up of bacteria inside your washing machine. The low-temperature washes create a cosy environment for the bacteria to grow and multiply. The residue left by this growth then allows the mould to grow.

Also, because of these low temperatures, residues from detergents and grease from your laundry remain in your washing machine creating the conditions for mould growth.

It's not only door seals that are affected.  You will also find black mould build up in the dispenser drawer and housing where you add the detergent and softener.

You should be aware that these are the visible areas.  You can see mould on your door seal every time you open the door.  Your mouldy soap drawer is evident every time you fill it up.  But what about the inside of the washing machine?  If your door seal is mouldy then the inside of the washing machine drum, where you put your washing, will also be covered with bacteria and mould!

How do bacteria get Into my washing machine

Bacteria enters your washing machine mainly from our soiled clothes.  Consider the following regular items of washing:

  • soiled bed linen
  • washable nappies
  • dog fouling remains on clothes
  • toilet mats
  • pet's bedding and towels
  • greasy overalls

While modern-day detergents are designed to wash at much lower temperatures, they won’t kill bacteria found on items such as listed above, in the way a boil wash does!

Consequences of Bacteria and Black Mould Build Up

Firstly, it is unsightly.  Secondly, it could become a health hazard. Mould can also release spores which have the potential to irritate the lungs when inhaled.
If the build-up is excessive, it may be transferred to the laundry as you remove it from your washing machine. These marks may be stubborn to remove from clothing.
Excessive build up will become slimy and start to smell.   If you leave your laundry in the washing machine drum for a length of time after the cycle has finished, you will notice that your clothes are smelly.
Sheared drum support shafts have become a real problem usually causing the washing machine to become uneconomic to repair.  The residue of bacteria build-up is a jelly-like substance which fills the cavities in the drum support shaft arms.  The support shaft arms are a metal alloy and acids created by bacteria enhance the corroding effect.

How can I treat and avoid bacteria in my washing machine

By merely replicating what we used to do years ago!  Now and then put your washing machine through a service wash to help kill any bacteria build up.


This fault can be the cause of other washing machine problems such as the door won’t open, and the drum is not spinning.

Check for blockages

First of all, you will want to empty the water from the washing machine.  Following the process outlined in the video below will also determine if you have a blockage, or not.

Check the pump

If your washing machine isn’t blocked, then the fault will most likely be with the pump.

Possible faulty components that cause a washing machine not to empty

Faulty Pump

Once a blockage has been ruled out the most likely cause of a washing machine not emptying is a faulty pump.

How to replace a washing machine door handle

Watch our DIY repair video on replacing a faulty washing machine pump.

Faulty Module

Although an uncommon fault, circuit boards do fail from time to time.  It is best to seek the advice of a qualified technician if you suspec a faulty control module.

Источник: https://www.ransomspares.co.uk/common-washing-machine-problems/

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Источник: https://shop.bodybuilding.com/products/rsp-nutrition-shaker-bottle

8 remedies for cracked heels and what causes them

  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • The best remedies for cracked heels can fix the problem quickly and don’t have to cost a lot of money either.

    Cracked heels are caused by a number of reasons – from not drinking enough water to diabetes. Thankfully, cracked heels are a problem that can be fixed with home remedies.

    We asked three experts about why our feet sometimes suffer from dry skin, what the best remedies for cracked heels are and how to care for our feet in order to stop our heels becoming dry and cracked in future.

    What causes cracked heels?

    ‘Cracked heels are generally caused when the skin around the heel needs to split to cope with the pressure placed on the feet,’ explains Emma McConnachie, spokesperson for the College of Podiatry in London.

    For example, if you stand on your feet all day the pressure can contribute to cracked heels. ‘The chances of it happening are increased if the skin is dry, if there’s a build-up of dead skin known as callus, and if you wear backless shoes which will increase friction in the area,’ says Emma.

    There are other causes, too, says Tina Svetek, Cosmetic Scientist at the award-winning School of Natural Skincare. ‘Ill-fitting shoes, as well as low levels of hydration, can all contribute to dry, calloused skin that starts to crack. Several medical conditions also cause cracked heels – for example, diabetes, fungal infections, psoriasis, eczema and obesity. However, even in healthy individuals, cracked heels can be quite common,’ she says.

    While the thick skin on our heels can look unsightly, it’s there for a reason. ‘Generally speaking, dry skin on our feet is actually protection for the tissues that lie beneath it – without that hardened horny layer of the skin every step we make would be much more unpleasant,’ says Tina. ‘Completely removing all of the dry skin is not possible, and it’s not even a good idea. But when the skin gets too dry, it can start cracking and this can lead to pain and even deep, bleeding cracks.’

    Best home remedies for cracked heels

    Soak your feet once a week

    ‘A simple foot soak done approximately once a week, followed with a rich nourishing cream, is a lovely way to keep the skin hydrated and soft,’ says Tina, auslogics driver updater suggests this quick DIY foot spa.  ‘Don’t forget to use warm water, though. Hot water can cause dryness.’

    Some people like to add fresh lemon juice to their foot soak as the acid in the fruit helps to get rid of dry skin cells. Soak for 10 minutes then scrub your feet with a soft brush.

    A foot shaped pumice stone

    A pumice stone gets rid of dead skin. (Credit: Getty)

    Use a pumice stone

    ‘If there’s a build-up of dead skin you can buff this with a foot file or pumice stone,’ says Emma. You can buy a pumice stone in most pharmacies or invest in the Magnitone Well Heeled 2 Pedicure System which provides two settings to buff away hard, rough skin.

    However, don’t over-do it. ‘Avoid frequent mechanical removal of dry, cracked skin on the heels,’ warns Tina. ‘Using foot files (or pumices stones) too often, actually sends “protective dry skin layer is gone, we need to make more dry skin” information to the body. This only causes more and more dry skin build-up,’ she says. ‘Occasional removal is OK, as long as it’s followed by regular use of hydrating foot products.’

    If it’s quite bad and you’re not sure how manage it ‘thicker build-ups can be safely removed by a podiatrist,’ says Emma. ‘It’s not advisable to use sharp implements yourself to remove the skin – and if your cracks have been bleeding or look infected cover them with a clean, dry dressing and seek help,’ she advises.

    L'Occitane shea butter foot cream for cracked heels

    Shea butter is kind to cracked heels. (Credit: L’Occitane)

    Smother your feet in shea butter

    ‘Apply a good moisturiser containing shea butter as a base,’ recommends Natalie Gooding, podiatrist and owner of The Organic Foot Company. ‘These ingredients are similar to our skins natural ph. and are easily absorbed by our skin,’ she says. Try L’Occitane Shea Butter Foot Cream.

    Solgar Female Multiple supplement

    A multivitamin will give you a boost. (Credit: Solgar)

    Treat deficiences

    Certain deficiencies, such as a lack of vitamins B, C E and minerals iron and zinc, can contribute to cracked heels. If you think this may be the problem – for example, you may already have anaemia – taking a supplement can help. Trusted brand Solgar’s Female Multiple is a multivitamin with minerals.

    A view of a woman on a beach wearing espadrilles

    Avoid slip-ons and wear comfortable shoes. (Credit: Getty)

    Wear the right footwear

    ‘To help reduce the chances of getting cracked skin around your heels, ensure your footwear fits correctly and try not to wear slip-on shoes,’ says Natalie.

    Tina agrees: ‘Too-tight shoes can quickly cause blisters and horns, while too-loose shoes can cause horny and calloused skin due to constant rubbing of the shoe on the skin.’ So treat your feet to well-fitted shoes and, in the summer months, when you start to wear flip-flops and open-back sandals again, moisturise your heels regularly so they suffer less from the lack of support your feet get from wearing them.

    Eucerin Urea Repair Plus Foot Cream

    A urea-based cream can really help. (Credit: Eucerin)

    Slather on a urea-based cream

    ‘Use a urea-based cream designed for cracked heels,’ says Emma. ‘These are easily available and are inexpensive to buy. An everyday cream would contain 5-10% urea and a cracked heel cream around 25% urea.’

    One option is Eucerin Dry Skin UreaRepair Plus 10% Urea Foot Cream – it contains both urea and ceramide for instant moisturisation, and prevents moisture loss.

    Amlactin AHA foot cream

    AHAs can soothe and moisturise feet. (Credit: Amlactin)

    Apply AHA sometimes

    ‘Doing occasional treatments using alpha hydroxy acids (AHA) is a sure way to prevent too much dry skin build-up,’ suggests Tina. ‘Softening the skin with products that contain chemical exfoliants, such as AHAs, is a nice way to keep dry skin amount at bay. They can be found as occasional treatments (with high strength acids) or regular treatments (with low strength acids) – both hydrate the skin very well.’

    AmLactin Foot Repair Foot Cream Therapy is well-rated and contains Alpha-Hydroxyl to exfoliate and hydrate your heels.

    A woman applying moisturiser to her cracked heels

    Regular moisturising is key. (Credit: Getty)

    Moisturise your feet daily

    ‘Moisturising feet frequently is the best solution for cracked heels,’ says Emma. ‘If you apply the cream thickly with socks overnight it doesn’t speed up healing but it will hold the cream in place while it’s absorbed. But little and often works just as well. To maintain good quality skin use a pea-sized amount of a foot cream on your heels every day.’ What’s more you’ll reap the benefits of a little self-care.

    Natalie agrees: ‘I would recommend applying a good moisturiser daily to help keep the skin hydrated,’ such as her own Mint & Lime Foot Cream. blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U filing the skin first with an emery board will help remove dry skin and surface debris. This will allow a cream or balm to absorb better into the skin.’

    A jar and spoon full of coconut oil for cracked heels

    Coconut oil is blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U good after a foot soak. (Credit: Getty)

    Is coconut oil good for cracked heels?

    ‘Coconut oil is excellent for cracked heels. It contains a high concentration of vitamin E and natural proteins that help repair damaged skin cells,’ says Natalie. ‘It also contains natural lauric acid, which has both antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.’

    For maximum results, Tina recommends using coconut oil after bathing. ‘Coconut oil is good for skin, especially if applied after a soak,’ she says. ‘Bath water will provide moisture, while coconut oil with help to “lock” the moisture in.’

    If you find coconut oil a little greasy, try Burt’s Bees Coconut Foot Cream, which deeply penetrates dry skin.

    How to care for your heels to stop them becoming dry and cracked

    Our recommended home remedies for cracked heels will help keep your feet in tip-top shape. Sometimes, though, the condition may get worse before it gets better. Try a repair cream such as Scholl Cracked Heel Repair Cream – which contains keratin that acts as a “scaffold” to aid skin repair – or Margaret Dabbs’ Cracked Heel Sealer, which creates a barrier to lock in moisture. If you need still need help, see a professional.

    Related Content

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    ‘A podiatrist can safely remove any dead skin build-ups and help advise on preventing reoccurrence,’ advises Emma. ‘Podiatrists (previously known as chiropodists) are trained to degree level and are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). To see a podiatrist on the NHS, please check with your local area or GP. Or you can see a private podiatrist without the need for referral. You can search for one in your local area using this Find a Podiatrist function.’

    ‘Occasionally cracks in the skin around your heels can provide an entry for bacteria or infection,’ warns Natalie. ‘If this occurs, seek professional advice and treatment from your podiatrist.’

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/wellbeing/home-remedies-cracked-heels-94846

    A blender is the only machine in your kitchen that can produce a beverage from chunks of ice and fruit in less than 60 seconds. And no other blender we’ve tested since 2012 can reliably produce silky soups, spoon-thick smoothies, and stable emulsifications like the Vitamix 5200. Yes, it’s pricey, but we think its powerful motor, nuanced controls, and long-lasting reliability make it worth the investment.

    In our tests, from 2012 to now, Vitamix blenders have always performed the best overall. The classic Vitamix 5200 is the only one we’ve tried that can make creamy peanut butter and puree hearty soup without spewing molten liquid up the sides of the jar. It doesn’t have any preset buttons, but it does offer the widest range of speeds (far wider than on the comparably priced Blendtec Designer 675) of any blender we’ve tested. It’s a favorite in many (if not most) professional kitchens and juice bars. We’ve also found the Vitamix 5200 to be one of the most reliable and durable blenders we’ve tested, and if the motor burns out within the seven-year warranty period, Vitamix will promptly replace the machine.

    The Oster Versa Pro Series Blender is the best of a new breed of more budget-friendly high-powered blenders. Compared with similarly priced blenders, this 1,400-watt model offers more speed variations and runs more quietly; it’s also one of the few models that come with a tamper for bursting air pockets in thick mixtures. At 17½ inches tall, it will fit better on a counter under a cabinet than most other high-performance blenders. We don’t think this is the absolute best blender out there, and it doesn’t compare to Vitamix blenders in power and longevity (we burned out our Oster after two and a half years), but it does have serious blending skills, a user-friendly design, and a solid, seven-year warranty. If you don’t want to throw down almost half a grand on a powerful blender, the Oster is your best bet.

    If you’re not ready to spring for the Vitamix, and you don’t mind trading the Oster’s longer warranty for a little more power, go for the 1,800-watt Cleanblend Blender. The Cleanblend’s strong motor helps pulverize berry seeds and ice, creating creamier smoothies and piña coladas than even the Vitamix can produce. This model’s jar is made of thick, durable Tritan plastic and has a comfortable, grippy handle. Unlike the Oster blender, the Cleanblend doesn’t have any preset buttons and doesn’t offer much variance between the low and high speeds. In our testing, the Cleanblend’s motor has held up better than the Oster’s and is still going strong after four years of regular use. But Cleanblend covers this blender with only a five-year warranty, in contrast to the seven years of coverage from both Vitamix and Oster. And since Cleanblend has been around only since 2013, we’re still a little uncertain of the company’s staying power and the reliability of its customer service.

    Not everyone wants to spend $200, let alone over $400, on a blender. If you want a blender for whipping up the occasional sauce or smoothie, the KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender is the best model available for around $100. With a 48-ounce jar and a low profile, the K150 is the smallest blender we recommend in this guide. It produced coarser textures than any of our other picks did, and its motor isn’t nearly as powerful (so it’s more likely to burn out if overtaxed). Another compromise you make for the price is in the warranty, as unlike our other picks the KitchenAid is covered for only one year. But it’s a good, all-purpose blender that’s small enough to fit on the counter under most kitchen cabinets.

    Why you should trust us

    As a senior staff writer for Wirecutter, I’ve covered everything from chef’s knives to stand mixers, and I’ve tested every blender worth testing since 2014. I also have a breadth of cooking and entertaining knowledge from decades of working in restaurants and magazine test kitchens. This guide builds on the work of Christine Cyr Clisset, now a deputy editor at Wirecutter.

    We reached out to Jonathan Cochran, a former blender salesperson who now runs the site Blender Dude, for his take on the best Vitamix and Blendtec models to test (his site has affiliate partnerships with both companies). For our original guide, authored by Seamus Bellamy, we consulted with Lisa McManus, an executive editor in charge of equipment testing at Cook’s Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines.

    Blender vs. food processor: Which one should you get?

    Although there’s some overlap in what they can do, blenders and food processors aren’t interchangeable appliances. A countertop blender is a better tool for making purees, quick sauces, and emulsifications (such as mayonnaise and vinaigrette), and it’s the only appliance that can whip berries and fibrous veggies into a silky-smooth texture. Because a blender’s jar is narrow and usually angled at the base, it creates a vortex that helps pass ingredients through the blades more frequently than in a food processor, yielding smoother textures.

    With a little effort, you can also puree wet ingredients (such as tomatoes for sauce) in a food processor, but the doughnut-shaped container doesn’t handle liquids as well as a blender’s jar does—it tends to leak. A food processor works fine for thick purees like hummus and is great for sauces with a coarser texture like pesto. But it can’t make a good smoothie and—since you can’t control the speed of the blades—is liable to shoot hot soup everywhere. Instead, a food processor is best for chopping, slicing, and grating. With the right attachment, it can even mix and knead dough. Many people use food processors for mincing vegetables, but this appliance is also your best friend for easily grating cheese, slicing potatoes for a gratin, grinding fresh bread crumbs, or quickly cutting butter into flour to make pie dough.

    In short, blenders liquefy, food processors chop and slice. Depending on your needs, you might choose one over the other, or you might want both. We have a guide to the best food processors, too, if you’re interested.

    What type of blender should you get?

    A countertop blender delivers the silkiest smoothies, daiquiris, soups, and sauces of any style of blender you can buy. It’s more versatile than a personal blender (which is meant mainly for smoothies) because it holds more and can handle hot liquids. It’s also more powerful than an immersion blender, which is great for pureeing soups directly in the pot or making a quick mayo but doesn’t yield the velvety textures you get from a good countertop blender.

    That said, a blender’s performance and longevity are usually proportional to its cost. High-end blenders are more powerful and designed to puree the thickest mixtures without burning out, something that inexpensive blenders simply can’t do. If you want a kitchen workhorse—a machine that can tackle everything from hot soups and sauces to thick frozen concoctions—a full-size, high-powered blender is the best choice. How much you should spend on one depends on exactly what you’ll use it for. Below is a breakdown of what each of our picks will do for you.

    Get our budget pick, the KitchenAid, if:

    • You use your blender only for the occasional smoothie, frozen drink, or soup.
    • You don’t blend nut butters or other motor-taxing mixtures.
    • A short, limited one-year warranty isn’t a concern.

    Get our runner-up, the Oster, or our also-great pick, the Cleanblend, if:

    • You blend no more than a few times a week.
    • You rarely make nut butters.
    • A five- or seven-year warranty is important to you.

    Get our top pick, the Vitamix, if:

    • Blending is part of your daily lifestyle.
    • You frequently blend thick, motor-taxing mixtures like nut butters and spoonable smoothies.
    • You want a blender with the widest range of speeds for easily doing everything from blending hot liquids to pulverizing ice cubes.
    • A seven-year warranty is important to you.

    Alternatively, if you just want to make a daily smoothie, you might be better off with a NutriBullet (we’ve tested them all).

    How we picked

    Four blenders on a kitchen counter side by side.

    Since 2012, we’ve researched or tested almost every decent household blender available, from budget models starting at $40 to powerful, high-performance models topping out at $700. In all this testing, we’ve found the following criteria to be the most important to look for in a blender:

    Jar shape and motor strength

    A great blender should be able to smoothly process tough items like fibrous kale, frozen berries, and ice without burning out the motor. How efficiently a blender does this depends on a combination of the blade length and position, the shape of the mixing jar, and the motor strength. All three of those elements combine to create a vortex that pulls food down around the blade.

    In our testing, we’ve found that blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U, tapered jars with a curved bottom develop a more consistent vortex than short, wide ones with a flat bottom. But the better blending vuescan full crack - Crack Key For U you get from a taller, tapered jar comes with a trade-off: A fully assembled blender might be too tall to fit under low-hanging cabinets. Blenders with wide, short jars are better for countertop storage, but you’re sacrificing performance for that convenience.

    A more powerful motor also helps to create a better vortex and blends thick mixtures more easily than a weaker one. But a blender’s power rating isn’t easy information to come by. Most blender companies advertise only “peak horsepower,” a spec that’s misleading if you’re trying to determine a motor’s strength. A motor works at peak horsepower for just a fraction of a second, when you start the blender, in order to overcome inertia. Immediately after, the motor drops to its “rated horsepower,” which is the amount of power it can sustain without burning out. As explained on Cooking For Engineers, you can get a ballpark estimate of a blender’s rated horsepower by dividing its wattage by 746 (because 746 watts equals approximately one unit of electrical horsepower). This equation doesn’t account for efficiency, but it does offer a more realistic approximation of a blender’s power output.

    We’ve found that tall, tapered jars with a curved bottom develop a more consistent vortex than short, wide ones with a flat bottom.

    Jar material

    Most of the blenders we’ve tested come with plastic jars. All of our picks have jars made of BPA-free Tritan plastic, which is very durable. Many of the lower-end blenders we’ve tested don’t advertise which material their jars are made of beyond a “BPA-free” note. But the majority of these jars are probably made of polycarbonate, which is more rigid than Tritan but also very strong. Both materials will crack if heated too high, which is why these jars should not go in the dishwasher.

    We understand that some folks prefer metal or glass jars. But you’d be hard-pressed to find a powerful blender with a glass jar, and there’s probably a good reason for this. As April Jones explains in her article on Cooking For Engineers: “Due to the high-speed blades and high horsepower motors, glass isn’t the safest option for professional-grade blenders. If a metal object, such as a spoon or knife, were accidentally left in the blender, a glass pitcher could shatter and potentially cause an injury. Using polycarbonate plastics or copolyester is a much safer option to avoid the hazard of broken glass.” Stainless steel jars are durable but opaque, and we like to monitor the progress of purees and emulsifications without having to remove the lid.

    Price

    Judging from buyer reviews, the holy grail for many home cooks seems to be a $50 or $100 blender that performs like a $500 Vitamix or Blendtec. But that isn’t realistic. High-end blenders priced at $150 and up—often called high-performance blenders—offer more power, produce much smoother textures, and generally last a lot longer than lower-end, under-$100 blenders. High-performance blenders also tackle tasks that you’d never want to try in a cheap blender, such as making peanut butter or milling grains.

    That said, there’s nothing wrong with a cheap blender as long as you understand its limitations. Some people want an affordable midrange blender to make the occasional daiquiri or smoothie. So we’ve tested blenders in a wide range of prices with the understanding that, for the most part, you get what you pay for.

    Warranty

    The most common complaint we’ve found about cheap blenders is that their motors burn out easily and their jars crack or leak. But it’s not impossible for even higher-end blenders to encounter burnout. As Lisa McManus, executive editor in charge of equipment testing at Cook’s Illustrated and Cook’s Country magazines, told our writer Seamus Bellamy in an interview for our 2012 guide, “Blenders have a really hard job to do in that little space. The motor is only so big. If you make it do something difficult every day, a lot of them burn out. It’s a lot of stress to put on a little machine.” This is why a long warranty is important, especially if you’re paying a lot for a blender. Vitamix, Oster, and Cleanblend models all come with warranties of five to seven years, and—at least for Vitamix machines—we’ve read plenty of owner reviews saying the blender lasts much longer. You can’t expect that level of performance from dirt-cheap blenders, which is probably why most of them come with only one-year limited warranties.

    One of our authors, documenting the testing notes in a notebook.

    Speed control

    Whether you choose a blender with anydvd hd 8.2 2.0 crack - Activators Patch controls or preset functions is largely a personal preference. But we appreciate a powerful blender with a simple interface that includes an on/off switch, a pulse button, and a variable-speed dial. These easy controls allow you to quickly adjust the speed or turn off the machine if things get messy.

    Preset programs for making smoothies, mixing soups, or crushing ice can be great if you want to multitask in the kitchen while blending. But we’ve also found that these functions rarely deliver purees as smooth as when we control the speed and time with the manual setting.

    Tamper

    In our years of testing, we’ve found that a tamper—a small plastic bat that lets you push food down into the blades—separates the great blenders from the good ones. When a blender is really cranking, air pockets tend to form around the blade, and a tamper allows you to burst them without having to stop the machine. The tamper that comes with a blender is designed to safely clear the blades of that particular model, as long as you use it with the lid on. Using a different tamper or another tool that might hit the moving blades is dangerous and could damage the machine. If your blender doesn’t come with a tamper, the only way you should burst air pockets is to turn the machine off, remove the jar from the base, and stir the mixture with a spoon.

    One of our writers shown using a blender to make a smoothie.

    So why don’t all blenders come with a tamper? Because forcing frozen and thick mixtures into the blades puts a lot of stress on the motor. Performance blenders that include tampers have powerful motors that can handle this stress—they’re designed for it. But cheaper blenders have weaker motors. If they were to include tampers, people would probably push these machines past their limits, ultimately prompting the motor to burn out.

    How we tested

    A bowl of kale, ready for future smoothies, next to the Cleanblend blender smoothie maker.

    We judged each model on how well it performed everyday blending jobs such as making thick frozen smoothies and hot soups. We also wanted to see which blenders could emulsify eggs and oil into mayonnaise and pulverize nuts into a smooth butter. In each blender, we made a thick green smoothie packed with frozen bananas and berries, kale, and coconut water. We looked at each blender’s ability to create a consistent vortex without taxing the motor or needing additional liquid. Afterward, we tasted the smoothies to assess mouthfeel, and then we strained the remainder through a fine-mesh sieve to see how well the blenders had pulverized tough greens and berry seeds.

    A blender can be a useful tool for making emulsified sauces such as mayonnaise, hollandaise, vinaigrettes, and Caesar dressing, so we tested each model’s ability to emulsify mayonnaise made with one egg yolk. Making a successful blender mayonnaise (or hollandaise or Caesar) hinges on the blades sitting low enough in the jar that they start whipping the egg yolk before you add a drop of oil.

    To see how the motors handled dense purees, we processed raw peanuts into peanut butter. With our finalists, we made rounds of piña coladas to see how well they blended ice into slush.

    Additionally, we noted how easy or difficult each blender was to clean, how noisy each model was, whether any of them produced a burning smell while the motor ran, whether the jars were difficult to attach to the bases, and how easy the interfaces were to use.

    Our pick: Vitamix 5200

    The Vitamix 5200 shown on a kitchen counter.

    The Vitamix 5200 offers the best performance you can get in a home blender. This model has been one of our favorite blenders since 2014, and it’s the classic Vitamix that has remained the standard for pro chefs and blender enthusiasts. It consistently performed at the top of the pack in our tests, and it came recommended to us by multiple experts because it powerfully purees and pulverizes food more reliably, thoroughly, and elegantly than most blenders.

    The Vitamix 5200 did not make the absolute smoothest smoothies of all the blenders we tested—that prize went to the Blendtec and Cleanblend machines. But when it came to consistent and graceful performance, the Vitamix won every time. This model was the only blender we tested that smoothly blended peanuts and almonds into butter. And whereas other blenders, such as the Blendtec, Cleanblend, and Oster, spit bits of mayo up the sides of the jar and out the lid’s center hole, the Vitamix kept the mixture smoothly and evenly moving around the base of the blade.

    We found Vitamix’s variable-speed dial to have the best range among the blenders we tried. Its low is really low, and the blender produces a noticeable shift as you advance through each number. In our tests, this range of speeds made the Vitamix the best blender for hot liquids: You can start blending at a lazy swirl and slowly increase the speed so that the hot liquid is less likely to shoot up toward the lid and risk a volcanic, trip-to-the-burn-unit situation. In comparison, the Cleanblend has a forceful start on the lowest setting, which increases the chances of a painful eruption when you’re blending hot soups. The same goes for the Blendtec Designer 675, which in our tests was so powerful that the soup setting created a cyclone in a jar.

    The Vitamix’s tamper is essential for breaking up air pockets and pushing ingredients down toward the blade while the machine is running. When using models without a tamper, we often needed to stop the blender to burst air pockets or scrape ingredients down the sides of the jar with a spatula. In some cases, we also had to add more water to the smoothie to get all the ingredients to move around the blades without the help of a tamper. For all these reasons, blending in the Vitamix with a tamper took about half the time as it took in the Blendtec with no included tamper. By keeping the ingredients moving, we were able to whip up a smoothie in about 30 seconds.

    The speed controls and switches on the Vitamix 5200 blender.

    The Vitamix’s Tritan-plastic jar feels sturdier than those of the other blenders we recommend, and the grippy handle is comfortable to hold. We also found the tall, narrow, tapered shape of the jar to be ideal for creating a strong vortex that pulled ingredients down toward the blade. That feature helped the Vitamix blend more efficiently than the Oster, with its wider jar, and the result was vastly superior to what we got from the wide, blocky jar of the Blendtec. Like the jars of most other high-powered blenders, the jar of the Vitamix (which has the blade attached) is very easy to clean: After you make a smoothie or something similar, you should find it sufficient to just pour in a bit of hot water, add a couple of drops of dish soap, blend for 30 seconds or so, and then rinse out the jar.

    No high-powered blender we tested could be described as quiet, but we found the noise from the Vitamix to be much less offensive than the high-pitched whine of the Blendtec, and it was quieter than the roar of our runner-up, the Oster Versa.

    Should its motor overheat, the Vitamix is equipped with an automatic shutoff feature to keep it from burning out. In our experience, the Vitamix should be able to handle a lot before it gets to that point, but if your Vitamix does shut off, it’s best to let the machine rest for an hour before you try to use it again.

    One thing that softens the blow of spending more than $400 on a Vitamix is the comfort of knowing that it’s backed by a seven-year warranty. We called Vitamix’s customer service and learned that the approximate time between filing a claim and receiving your blender back in working order (or a certified refurb) is six to 10 days. For an additional fee, you can buy a three-year extended warranty for the 5200. If you purchase a new Vitamix from the company’s site or from a certified third-party retailer, such as Amazon, you have 30 days from the date of purchase to buy the extended warranty directly from Vitamix for $75. After 30 days have passed, you can purchase the extended warranty up until the original one expires for around $120.

    You can save some money on a Vitamix if you opt for a certified-refurbished model. Jonathan Cochran of Blender Dude highly recommends them. “My pick for ‘best bang for the buck’ continues to be the Certified Refurbished (Blendtec) and Certified Reconditioned (Vitamix) models. I have personally inspected hundreds of each, and for all intents and purposes they are indistinguishable from the new models at a significantly reduced price point,” he told us. A certified reconditioned Vitamix comes with a five-year warranty, with the option to extend coverage three more years for an additional $75.

    Long-term test notes

    We used the same Vitamix 5200 in our test kitchen for five years with nothing but excellent results. It finally did burn out, but only after we put it through strenuous use over the course of many tests for both this guide and others. Still, it easily outlasted the Oster, and it made many more (and better) batches of nut butter and extra-thick smoothies before we pushed it to its limit. Since our Vitamix was still under warranty when it burned out, we contacted customer service, and the representatives promptly replaced it.

    I’ve also used a Vitamix at home for years, and it’s still my favorite household blender, period. I long-term tested the runner-up, the Oster, for six months and noticed some glaring differences: The Vitamix can handle scriptcase serial number - Free Activators without its motor straining, and the Vitamix’s tamper is much better than the Oster’s, which wps office crack apk really hard to get down in there.

    Over the years, other Wirecutter staffers have expressed love for their Vitamix blenders. Former special projects editor Ganda Suthivarakom, who had used hers since 2015 without issue, said: “I love that I can make a lot of vegan recipes for cashew creams without having to soak the nuts beforehand.” Senior staff writer Chris Heinonen, who has owned his Vitamix since 2018, guesses that he has “used it more than all my blenders in the past combined.” The only minor complaint we’ve heard is from senior editor Kalee Thompson, who notes: “It’s so tall, it doesn’t fit under the upper shelves over my counters . so I’m less inclined to leave it out, and once it’s away, I don’t use it as much.” That said, others have told us how much they appreciate the Vitamix’s large capacity.

    Flaws but not dealbreakers

    We know that for many people, the biggest issue with the Vitamix 5200 is its steep price. At around $400 or so, it’s at least twice the price of our runner-up, the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender. In the past, we’ve even made the Oster our top pick because of its comparatively affordable price. But after years of testing the Vitamix and using it in our test kitchen, we think it’s truly worth the investment. It’s more durable and all-around more effective than any other blender we’ve found, and if you plan on using a blender regularly, it will make your life a lot easier. Plus, consider the cost of buying a smoothie rather than making it at home: A morning smoothie can run from about $5 to $13, so in two to four months you will have paid the same amount as for a 5200. A Vitamix, by contrast, will last you at least seven years (and it makes a lot more than smoothies).

    At more than 20 inches tall, the Vitamix 5200 is a big appliance—too big to fit under some kitchen cabinets. But none of the other high-powered blenders we tested were much smaller. Though the Oster is a couple of inches shorter, it also has a beefier base. If size is an issue for you, Vitamix makes other lines of blenders (as mentioned below) that have a shorter profile. But we’ve found that the tall, narrow shape of the 5200’s blending jar is one of the components that help this machine create such an effective vortex.

    Finally, the Vitamix 5200 doesn’t come with any presets, just a variable-speed dial. But even though it’s nice to be able to press a button and have your blender run through a smoothie-making program, it’s not really essential. You’ll probably stick close to your blender anyway in order to use the tamper to get things moving, and it’s not hard to adjust the dial if you feel the need to. With the Vitamix it’s also easy to get good results without any presets.

    What about other Vitamix models?

    The 5200 isn’t the only blender in Vitamix’s selection—if you want the blending power of the 5200 but strongly prefer presets, or if you need a shorter jar that will fit your space, consider looking into other models. (If you want a good breakdown of the different Vitamix models, Jonathan Cochran of Blender Dude compares them.)

    That said, the original 5200 remains our favorite because every new blender from Vitamix comes with a squat jar that doesn’t blend small amounts as well as the 5200’s tall and tapered pitcher. We tested the 5300, for example, and found that the base of its short jar was too wide to develop and maintain a vortex for making, say, a thick smoothie for one or two people. Check out the Competition section for more detailed testing notes on the 5300.

    We haven’t tested any models from the new Vitamix Ascent Series, but we suspect we’d have the same issue with the shorter, squatter jars. According to owner reviews, the Ascent blenders seem to suffer from some other problems, too, such as a complicated adapter for the personal blending cup and a sensor that shuts off the machine if it detects that the mixture in the jar is too thick. Our reflector for chromebook feature of the 5200 is its ability to blend absurdly thick concoctions!

    Runner-up: Oster Versa Pro Series Blender

    Our runner-up pick the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender on a kitchen counter.

    We don’t think you can beat the value of the Oster Versa Pro Series Blender. It isn’t quite as powerful as the Vitamix 5200, but it is about half the price, and it beat out most of the other blenders in its price range at making silky smoothies, purees, and blended cocktails. It has one of the best combinations of variable and preset speeds we’ve found, and its settings are more intuitive to use than those on other models we’ve tried. It also offers features, such as a tamper and overheating protection, that are usually available only on more expensive blenders. We don’t think the Oster is as durable as the Vitamix (ours burned out after two and a half years). But it does come with a seven-year warranty, and it’s a great option if you’re not ready to spring for the Vitamix.

    The Oster passed almost every challenge we threw at it. And although Wirecast Pro 14.3 Crack + Serial Key Free Download 2021 failed to achieve the absolute smoothest drink textures compared with the Blendtec or the Cleanblend—it left whole raspberry seeds in smoothies and made a slightly grainy piña colada—its smoothies were still much smoother than any of the results from lower-priced blenders. As long as the Oster had about 2 cups of nuts to work with, it made a decent nut butter (albeit one that was slightly crunchier than the batch we made in the Vitamix). And it whipped up a velvety puree. The only thing the Oster really struggled to do was make mayonnaise; we were able to make an emulsification only once out of four tries.

    We found the Oster easier to control than other blenders of a similar price, thanks to its wide range of speeds. Though not as varied as those on the Vitamix, the speeds on the Oster are far more diverse than those on the Cleanblend, which, despite its variable-speed dial, seems to have only two settings: high and higher. In comparison, the Oster’s low speed is sane enough that you can start pureeing a batch of soup without having hot liquid shoot up the sides of the jar (a problem with the Cleanblend).

    A smoothie made by the Oster being tested for smoothness by running it through a mesh strainer.

    The Oster is the only one of our blender picks to have both manual speed controls and preset programs for soup, dip, and smoothies. This makes it more versatile than the more expensive entry-level models from Vitamix and Blendtec, which have only variable or preset speeds, respectively. To get presets with a Vitamix, or a variable-speed “touch slider” with a Blendtec model, you need to spend even more.

    The tamper that comes with the Oster is a little too short and oddly shaped. In contrast to the smooth cylindrical tampers of the Vitamix and Cleanblend models, the Oster’s tamper has three flat pieces of plastic that meet in the middle. But the design works sufficiently to burst air bubbles and help move things like peanuts around the blades, so it’s better than no tamper at all.

    This Oster model, like other high-performance blenders, is a beefy machine. The base takes up 8 by 9 inches of counter space. But at 17½ inches tall to the top of the lid, the Oster will fit better on a counter under most kitchen cabinets than the Vitamix or the Cleanblend, both of which are more than 19 inches tall.

    Also, like all the other high-powered blenders we tested, the Oster gets loud when you turn the motor up all the way—much louder than the Vitamix but not as annoying or high-pitched as the Blendtec. For now, this is just the way it is with high-performance blenders.

    Like the Vitamix, the Oster shuts off if the motor is in danger of overheating. If the Oster’s overload protection stops the motor, you should allow it to cool for 45 minutes and press the reset button on the bottom of the base before you run the blender again. This procedure reduces the risk of permanent motor burnout.

    The Oster Versa passed almost every challenge we threw at it.

    Should it burn out, the Oster comes with a limited seven-year warranty that covers “defects in material and workmanship,” including the motor and the Tritan jar. That policy is about the same as the coverage from Blendtec and Vitamix, which offer eight- and seven-year warranties, respectively, on their models. In our experience, Oster’s customer service is courteous and quickly addresses any issues with a blender while it’s under warranty.

    But if you’re thinking that the Oster Versa will deliver the longevity and performance of a Vitamix 5200 at a fraction of the cost, think again. The Oster model’s biggest flaw is its durability: We found through personal experience that the Versa can burn out after two to three years of moderate to frequent use (see our long-term test notes for this model below). We’ve seen some reviews on Amazon (as well as comments from our readers) that mention the same problem. But Oster honors its seven-year warranty and is quick to send a replacement (we got ours in about a week). Although it took three attempts for us to get through to customer service by phone during the busy holiday shopping season, we’re assuming that hiccup was due to the unusually high call volume that occurs at that time of year.

    The blending jar, lid, and controls on the Oster also feel cheaper compared with what you get on the Vitamix. But given that this blender is typically almost $250 less, we’re comfortable with the lower-quality hardware.

    Long-term test notes

    For three years, we used the Versa twice a week on average to make smoothies and soup, and it never quit on us during that time—although we occasionally detected a faint burning smell from the motor while we were blending thick smoothies. But the motor permanently died when we formally tested the three-year-old Versa again for our 2017 update: One minute into our blending the nut butter, the overload protection cut the motor. We should’ve let the motor rest for 45 minutes before restarting, but we let it cool for only 10 minutes before our second attempt—and that’s when the motor burned out completely. However, our blender was still under warranty, and Oster quickly sent a replacement.

    Wirecutter’s audience development manager, Erin Price, uses the Oster Versa and so far has no complaints. She told us: “I’ve had the Oster Versa since 2016, and it’s still going strong (though it sat in storage for one of those years). I mostly use it for smoothies, and it handles ice and greens so well.”

    Also great: Cleanblend Blender

    A Cleanblend Blender on a counter next to smoothie ingredients that are on a cutting board.

    If you’re willing to take a chance on a shorter warranty from a newer company, the 1,800-watt Cleanblend Blender costs about the same as the Oster Versa and produces finer purees. In our tests, it blended silkier smoothies and piña coladas than many blenders that cost more than twice as much. This model comes with a durable Tritan-plastic jar and a tamper for you to help move thick mixtures while it’s blending. The Cleanblend doesn’t have any preset buttons, and its variable speeds aren’t as nuanced as those of the Vitamix, but its interface is simple total av antivirus serial key - Crack Key For U intuitive to use. Judging from our long-term testing, the Cleanblend’s motor is durable and able to handle tough jobs like nut butter better than the Oster. It’s also backed by a complete five-year warranty.

    The Cleanblend made some of the smoothest smoothies in our tests, performing better than the Oster and even the Vitamix in that regard. When we strained the Cleanblend’s kale and berry smoothie, barely any raspberry seeds remained in our fine-mesh sieve; the only blender that did better was the Blendtec. The Cleanblend also came in second, behind the Blendtec, in blending a silky-smooth piña colada. We’re talking restaurant-worthy blended drinks here.

    For blending other things, the Cleanblend has a few limitations. It doesn’t have as wide a range of speeds as the Oster or the Vitamix, and it kicks into high gear even at the 1 setting, which in our soup test sent hot liquid shooting up to the lid. Although the Cleanblend was better at making mayonnaise than the Oster, this model’s motor also seemed to produce a lot of heat; its mayo was noticeably warm. Like our other picks (except the KitchenAid, our budget pick), the Cleanblend comes with a tamper, but the bat is a little short. Although it works fine for most tasks, don’t attempt to make nut butter from fewer than 2 cups of nuts, because the shorter tamper won’t reach the mixture once the nuts are finely ground.

    The Cleanblend made some of the smoothest smoothies in our tests.

    Over our long-term testing, the Cleanblend’s motor has seemed more durable than the Oster’s, though we’re not sure it’s a match for the motor of the time-tested Vitamix. In our 2017 testing, our four-year-old Cleanblend and Vitamix blenders both powered through two rounds of nut butter without quitting. The same test fried our three-year-old Oster. That said, Oster offers a seven-year warranty on the Versa Pro Series Blender, but Cleanblend offers only a five-year total warranty.

    For an extra $75, you can extend the warranty on your Cleanblend Blender to a total of 10 years. This is a great value when you consider that the blender, including the decade of coverage, still costs about $200 less than a Vitamix. If you’re looking for the all-around beyond compare 4.3.4 license key performance of a Vitamix for less than half the cost, you won’t find that here (or anywhere else for that matter), but the Cleanblend is a good value when you compare the numbers.

    However, Cleanblend’s customer service is reachable only by email or a form on its website, and that might not inspire confidence in some people. Both Vitamix and Oster have a customer service phone number that connects you to a representative. Even though the Cleanblend seems more durable than the Oster, Cleanblend is such a new company that we’re not yet confident in its blender’s long-term reliability.

    The Cleanblend’s base takes up 9½ by 8 inches of counter space, about the same as our other high-performance picks (our budget pick, the KitchenAid, is smaller). And at 19 inches high to the top of the lid, the Cleanblend is taller than the Oster, but it has just slightly more clearance under most kitchen cabinets than the Vitamix (which measures closer to 20 inches). Also, like all of the other high-performance Avast Free Antivirus 21.5.2470 Crack + License Key Free Download 2021 we tested, the Cleanblend is loud. But compared with the Ninja Chef’s thunderous roar and the Blendtec’s high-pitched whine, the Cleanblend’s sound is far easier on the ears.

    Long-term test notes

    Senior staff writer Michael Sullivan has used an older version of the Cleanblend at home for about four years and says he has never had an issue with it. He pulls it out about six times a month to make smoothies, sauces, soup, or occasionally emulsifications like mayonnaise. He has even crushed ice in it a few times, and he says that so far it has never stalled out.

    Sabrina Imbler, a Wirecutter staff writer at the time of our tests, used the Cleanblend in her home for more than a year. She used it three to four times a week and never experienced stalling or burnout. She told us: “[My] only minor complaint is that sometimes the blender rattles a bit on top of the base, which makes me a little wary, but otherwise it’s great. I only use it for smoothies and mixed drinks, never any kind of nuts, but it pulverizes ice pretty quick. It’s also the perfect size for two smoothies. I tend to use the middle range of speeds, as I rarely need the highest, and the lowest is less effective for my needs. And I really like that it’s a dial as opposed to number buttons—easier to [crank] up if my stuff isn’t blending fast.”

    Budget pick: KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender

    A KitchenAid K150 blender shown filled with a pineapple smoothie on a kitchen counter.

    If you blend only the occasional smoothie, daiquiri, or soup, you don’t need an expensive high-powered blender. The KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender will serve your needs. Offering a low profile and a 48-ounce blending jar, this blender is the most compact of all our picks. In our tests, the K150 proved adequate at blending thick smoothies, but not without a couple of stops and starts or our having to add a little more liquid to get a consistent vortex going. It can’t puree tough berry seeds as our top pick can, nor can it produce such velvety-smooth frozen drinks. However, the K150 has a mighty motor for the price and will handle most simple blending tasks.

    The KitchenAid K150 offers three speeds plus a pulse setting for crushing ice. For frozen drinks and smoothies, the second speed seems to be the sweet spot, as that’s where we encountered the fewest air pockets. As with most blenders at this price, you need to add more liquid to get smoothies and frozen drinks to blend with a continuous vortex; otherwise, you need to stop it a couple of times to break up air pockets. Overall, we were satisfied with the drinks we made in the K150. The piña colada was a little icy but not offensive, and the smoothie was what we’d expect from a good $100 blender: very drinkable, with whole berry seeds and tiny flecks of kale.

    When you turn the K150 on, the blades automatically start slow and ramp up to the set speed, a feature that’s great for safely blending hot liquids like pureed soups. But it’s still important that you take precautions when blending hot foods, such as starting on low speed and securing the lid with a folded dish towel.

    We were pleasantly surprised that the K150 let us make a small batch of mayonnaise from Wondershare Filmora Scrn Offline Installer Download egg yolk and half a cup of oil. We didn’t think the jar’s wide square base and relatively short blade span would allow us to emulsify such a small volume.

    As its name indicates, the KitchenAid K150 3 Speed Ice Crushing Blender does crush ice. We’re not talking professional-grade fluffy shaved ice, but it’ll do the trick if you want to make a few snow cones on a hot summer day.

    The K150 is lightweight and compact—perfect for people who want to store their blender in a cabinet. It also has a low profile (15 inches) that allows it to fit easily in the standard clearance between kitchen countertops and upper cabinets (18 inches). But the pitcher is on the small side at 48 ounces, and it lacks the comfy rubber-clad handle on our other picks.

    As an alternative to buying this blender as is (base, 48-ounce jar, and lid), you can get it bundled with two personal blending cups for around $50 more. We haven’t tested the personal blending cups yet, but we’ll give them a try soon and report back. KitchenAid also plans to release a version of the K150 with a glass blending jar, though we prefer plastic blender jars for their durability.

    At this writing the K150 seems to have some stock issues post–Black Friday shopping. We’re told that stock should be replenished some time in January 2021 in a broader range of colors. The KitchenAid K150 comes with a one-year warranty that excludes accidents, drops, misuse, and abuse.

    Long-term test notes

    Wirecutter staff writer Sarah Bogdan has the K150, and she and her roommate use it a few times a month for smoothies. She says that it blends fruits just fine, but she wishes that it got a finer blend with the vegetables she adds like kale and spinach. However, her roommate who sticks to peanut butter, bananas, and protein powder has no issues with it. It’s been a little difficult to clean, but she also realizes that’s true of any full-size blender.

    Blender care and maintenance

    If you find that your blender is having a difficult time processing ingredients, don’t be afraid to be aggressive (within reason) with the tamper to get the mixture moving around the blades. Also, make sure the blender jar is at least 25% full. Although high speeds will help process smoother mixtures, a lower speed (PDF) may also help ingredients start circulating if they just aren’t moving. When you’re following a recipe, it’s also good to add ingredients in the order listed; blender recipe books tend to be specific with the order (Vitamix, for example, generally lists ice as the Aquasoft Slideshow Ultimate Offline Installer ingredient).

    To limit the risk of hot liquids shooting out the top of a blending jar, always start on a low setting and slowly increase the speed (in general, presets do this automatically). Never fill the jar past the hot-liquid fill line. And for good measure, to limit the risk of the lid popping off, place a dish towel over the lid, with your hand firmly holding the lid down, while you blend.

    Hand wash the blending jar with warm, soapy water rather than running it through the dishwasher. This will help extend the life of the jar. In our own testing, we found that the best way to clean a blender jar is to use a bottle brush or a scrub brush; processing water and a little soap in the blender jar will help loosen up tough ingredients such as peanut butter, and the brush should do the rest.

    The competition

    Compared with our top pick, the Vitamix 5200, the Vitamix 5300 has the same 64-ounce capacity and speed-control dial, but it lacks the ultra-high-speed switch available on the 5200. It has a slightly higher peak horsepower, but any extra power is negated by the shape of the jar. In testing, we found that the 5300’s relatively squat jar failed to maintain a vortex as well as the 5200’s narrow, tapered one. Also, for smaller volumes—2 cups or less—the 5300’s tamper didn’t reach down quite far enough to burst air pockets. We had to add more liquid to thicker mixtures, such as date puree and hummus, because the tamper wasn’t cutting it.

    The Vitamix Explorian E320, available at Costco, is 99% identical to the 5300. A Vitamix customer service representative told us that the two blenders had the same motor base, jar, tamper, and functionality. The main difference between the blenders is that the 5300 has a small on/off switch located just below the control panel. On top of that, the E320 is available only as part of a package with two personal cups and an adapter.

    Vitamix added the Explorian Series E310 variable-speed blender to its lineup in 2017. We chose not to test this model because we didn’t think it was a good value. Although it’s typically three-quarters the price of dvdfab player 6 ultra - Free Activators Vitamix 5200, the cost difference is directly proportional to the E310’s smaller blending jar (48 ounces versus 64 ounces) and shorter warranty (five versus seven years). On the E310, Vitamix also replaced the switch that flips the machine from variable speed to high power with a pulse switch, thus eliminating the option for one-touch high-power blending. If you have limited storage space in your kitchen, you might like the E310 for its shorter height (about 17 inches tall, compared with the Vitamix 5200, which is about 20 inches tall). But if you’re going to shell out the cash for a Vitamix blender, we still think spending a little more on the 5200 is the best choice.

    We bid a somber adieu to two near-identical former budget picks from KitchenAid: the 5-Speed Classic blender (still available refurbished as of May 2021) and the Diamond 5-Speed blender. The 5-Speed Classic was our budget pick for nearly five years before KitchenAid discontinued it and replaced it with the Diamond 5-Speed in 2019. In 2020, the company replaced the Diamond 5-Speed with the K150, our current budget pick. Buying the 5-Speed Blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U refurbished isn’t a bad option if you want to save a little money, but keep in mind that it only comes with a 6-month warranty.

    The KitchenAid K400 blender is more powerful than the KitchenAid K150 (our budget pick) but not enough to warrant its $150-plus price jump. And in our tests the K400 wasn’t nearly as good at blending fibrous kale as the less expensive Oster and Cleanblend blenders.

    The KitchenAid Pro Line Series Blender is expensive, and it’s also the heaviest blender we’ve tested (22 pounds). In our tests it blended silky-smooth textures, though not quite as easily as the Vitamix 5200, but it didn’t do well at blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U. While its performance intrigued us, after a year of long-term testing origin pro 2019 serial key - Free Activators model, we found that it delivered results similar to those of the Vitamix. And the heft and size of this KitchenAid model make it a difficult-to-move space hog.

    Will the Blendtec Designer 675 blend? Yes, but not as well as our top picks. Despite Blendtec’s clever (if at times mildly sinister) video marketing campaign of blending everything from rake handles to iPhones, we’ve found its blenders wanting (we also tested the Total model in 2012). Although in our tests the Designer 675 killed it in making smoothies and blended drinks, its lack of a tamper limits its usefulness. It failed to make peanut butter (a tamper would have helped), and the preset speed for soup was frightening, with hot liquid flying wildly around the jar. We do think this particular model is quite beautiful, with a sleek black, illuminated base. It’s a great blender if you want something that looks slick on your counter and can make amazingly smooth mixed drinks and smoothies. But we think a blender that’s this expensive should perform well at more than just those two tasks. For more on how the Blendtec stacks up against the Vitamix 5200, read our article about testing the two blenders head-to-head.

    We tested the Blendtec Total Blender for our 2012 review but found that it couldn’t compete with the Vitamix we tested at the time. The lid felt flimsy, and this model’s panel controls seemed cheap.

    The Breville Super Q is a performance blender that’s packed with bells and whistles. In our tests, with its squat jar and powerful motor, the Super Q performed a lot like the Blendtec Designer 675, throwing smoothie up the sides and into the lid. At one point, the Breville shot bits of a smoothie in my face when I opened the cap to add more liquid. The Super Q pulverizes tough foods, but the Vitamix also does that for less money—and with less drama inside the jar. The Super Q also generated a lot of heat when we made peanut butter—so much that we had to stop the test early when we noticed steam coming out of the jar. Although the Super Q blended the silkiest piña coladas and came with lots of extra goodies (a 68-ounce jar, a personal blending jar, preset blending programs, and a vacuum attachment that’s supposed to slow the oxidation of raw foods), we don’t think it’s worth the $100-plus over the Vitamix’s price, especially since most of those goodies would just clutter your cabinets.

    In our tests, the Cuisinart CBT-1500 Hurricane struggled to process foods. Blending thick smoothies and peanut butter required adding more liquid, a lot of starting and stopping, and banging the jar on the counter. It did make mayonnaise on the first try, though, unlike the more powerful Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro. But without the Turbo button of the Hurricane Pro (more on that below), this model is just another middle-of-the-road blender.

    The Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro performed similarly to the Cuisinart CBT-1500 Hurricane, except it didn’t make mayonnaise as well (we achieved emulsification on the third try only). We did find the Turbo button useful for creating a fine puree. But again, without a tamper to burst air pockets, this blender needed a lot of tending to produce uniform, smooth purees.

    The Ninja Chef CT800 1,500-watt blender is the first high-performance model from this company that doesn’t have sets of blades throughout the jar. Instead, the Ninja Chef’s blades sit in the base of the jar, as in normal blenders. This model also performed better than its predecessors. But it was extremely loud, and our top picks—the Vitamix, the Oster, and the Cleanblend—still blended silkier smoothies in our tests.

    For the price, the Ninja Master Prep Professional is a decent blender, but we don’t think it compares to any of our other picks. It did a surprisingly good job of making smoothies, mixing bean spread, and blending margaritas, but the design is terrible for making mayonnaise (the motor is top-mounted, so you can’t drizzle anything into the jar). The stacked blades are also dangerously sharp, making them difficult to clean. The Ninja Master Prep Professional comes with three blending jars in various sizes; we thought that it added up to too many parts and that they would just end up cluttering our cupboards. Overall, the machine felt really cheap.

    The Ninja Professional Blender 1000 didn’t perform well. The green smoothies we made in this blender had a weird, confetti-like texture. And the mayo this model made was especially loose, which meant that it was whipping in too much air. Every time we ran this Ninja blender, we detected a strong, burning-motor smell. The jar was hard to get on the base, and the lid was tricky to clamp on. Also, the base was big, clunky, and cheap feeling.

    The Instant Pot Ace 60 Cooking Blender is unique in that it has a heating element in its base, so it can both cook and puree foods (some high-powered blenders also claim to “cook” soup, but they do so only with friction). After performing extensive testing, we found that this seemingly nifty feature was impractical. We made a decent broccoli cheese soup and a smooth butternut squash puree, but we had to blend each one for longer than the programmed setting to get a creamy texture. And we were disappointed to discover that we couldn’t adjust the temperature or sauté in the machine, since the heating element doesn’t start if it doesn’t detect liquid in the jar. As such, the Ace doesn’t produce the same nuanced flavors that you’d get if you started with a little caramelization. The heating element also introduces another possible point of failure into a type of appliance that is already prone to burning out.

    The Ace whipped up smooth peanut butter and did a slightly better job of pulverizing ice cubes and tough kale leaves than most of the budget-level blenders we’ve tested. But it’s huge and loud, and its glass jar is heavier and less durable than the Tritan plastic jars of our picks. The jar’s wide base also makes it difficult for the Ace to form a powerful vortex (instead flinging ingredients all over the jar).

    The 1,800-watt Hamilton Beach Professional Blender performed well in our tests. When we used the manual speeds, the blender’s digital readout showed a countdown timer, which was helpful because the instruction manual advised against continuously running the motor for more than two minutes. But the preprogrammed settings didn’t effectively keep the mixture moving when air pockets occurred. In addition, the on/off buttons are angled upward at the top of the base and thus susceptible to food and grime buildup over time.

    Источник: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-blender/

    12 Best Protein Shakers (Review) In 2021

    Last updated: 18 Feb 2020
    blenderbottle classic loop top shaker

    BlenderBottle Classic Loop Top Shaker

    instashaker vortex mixer cup

    InstaShaker Vortex Mixer Cup

    contigo shake and go snap fit shaker bottle

    Contigo Shake and Go Snap Fit Shaker Bottle

    If you’re not prepping your gym time with a killer protein shake, then what are you even doing? Your protein shaker is like your right-hand man, your shield against fatigue, and your promise of a high caliber workout session that’s going to bring results. We’ve not only covered the top twelve shaker bottles, but we’ve also dug deep to solve all the problems that tend to pop up with them. We’ve researched the cream of the crop, detailed how to maintain them and buy the right one for your needs, and simplified the process as much as possible. You’re here for a better protein shake, so let’s hop into the best protein shakers available, and get you pumped up for your next workout.

    The Best Protein Shaker

    BlenderBottle Classic Loop Top Shaker

    BlenderBottle is at it again with another stellar protein shaker. Their Classic Loop Top Shaker comes with a super simple design and a standard black-and-white color set. There are dozens of other variations available, but added colors might cost a few bucks extra here and there. The real magic of BlenderBottle, apart from the BPA-free construction, is the surgical grade stainless steel agitator that flawlessly mixes your protein shakes into a smooth, creamy state of perfection. You get a total of twenty-eight ounces of storage space, a design that’s built to sit in cup holders without rattling around, and a top rack dishwasher safe stamp of approval. Simple, inexpensive and effective.

    Total of 28 oz of capacity

    BPA and phthalate-free

    Safe for top rack dishwasher use

    Mixer ball made of surgical grade stainless steel

    • BrandBlender Bottle
    • ModelC00573
    • Weight6.4 ounces

    BlenderBottle ProStak Protein Shaker

    You can’t beat BlenderBottle, no matter how hard you try. They’ve engineered the very best gym shakers, and this inexpensive rendition of their famous lineup is a shining example to that fact. You get a leak-proof SureSeal cap with a flip-up spout, which has a high blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U to prevent swaying and spilling. Pair that with the included protein powder jar that actually connects to the bottom of the shaker, and you’ve got an all-in-one travel station for your protein shake at the gym. Everything is BPA-free, phthalate-free, and completely safe to put in the dishwasher, making BlenderBottle ProStak one of the most durable and versatile protein shakers we’ve ever tested. If the basic steel gray style doesn’t suit your liking, you can always opt for one of their 20+ designs as well. Make sure you always keep it handy in your gym bag.

    Total 22 oz capacity

    Measurement markings

    Interlocking jar attaches to the bottom

    Leak-proof SureSeal cap

    • BrandBlender Bottle
    • ModelC01710
    • Weight8.5 ounces

    Performa Perfect Protein Shaker (Movie Collection)

    You’re not only given the option to choose from some of your favorite superheroes (we’re fans of The Punisher model), but you actually get to live with a superior protein shaker. Performa made Perfect Shaker (Movie Collection) completely shatter resistant, so a simple drop from the top of the dishwasher isn’t going to crack, split or pop any elements out of place. Combine that with their fantastic mixing technology, actionrod. That uses the force of motion with the agitator to create a piston that forces liquid in and out, keeping your protein shakes perfectly blended no matter what. You’ve got a leak-proof lid with a guarantee, as well as a completely BPA-free construction that’s 100% dishwasher safe. What’s not to love?

    One dozen movie and TV franchise models to choose from

    Completely shatter-proof barrel

    Guaranteed to be completely leak-proof

    Actionrod technology for better mixing

    • BrandPerfectShaker
    • ModelPSK1001/100/108
    • Weight1.6 ounces

    BluePeak Protein Shaker Bottle

    bluepeak protein shaker bottle
    bluepeak protein shaker bottle

    Trying to get his and hers set of protein shakers? We think it’s a romantic gesture, and BluePeak wants to make sure it goes off without a hitch. You get one black and one pink protein shaker with each purchase, both crafted out of a completely BPA-free durable plastic that’s extremely resistant to drops and scuffs. BluePeak stands out for their dual mixing technology, which includes an agitator ball, as well as a mixing grid to filter out any particles or clumps that haven’t been blended in properly. Each of these BluePeak Protein Shaker Bottles has a total of twenty ounces of capacity, and measurement markings that travel up to the sixteen-ounce mark. You’re hitting the gym with your lady, and you want to do it in style: BluePeak’s got your back.

    Completely BPA-free

    Dual mixing element keeps things smooth

    Markings go up to 16 oz out of the 20 oz capacity

    Two protein shakers per purchase

    • BrandBluePeak
    • Weight13 ounces

    Homiguar Protein Shaker Bottle

    This is a serious step-up in style, and Homiguar wastes no time getting right into the goods with this. The first thing you might notice is the peekaboo window into the contents of your shaker, so you can monitor how much you have left. I’ve personally chugged the last of my shake without realizing how low it was and it’s always a bummer, but that doesn’t have to happen anymore. Crafted out of stainless steel without a hint of BPA plastic, Homiguar Protein Shaker Bottle also features a fully leak-proof lid, and a nice lanyard loop on top to keep it by your side at all times.

    Completely BPA-free stainless steel construction

    Peekaboo window to see how much is left

    Total of 28 oz capacity

    Fully leak-proof lid

    • BrandHomiguar
    • Weight12 ounces

    PROMIXX Stainless Steel Electric Protein Shaker

    promixx stainless steel electric protein shaker
    promixx stainless steel electric protein shaker

    PROMIXX understands that you’re sick and tired of clumps and lumps in your protein shake. Admittedly, we’ve all grabbed those dollar store mixers and found that they haven’t worked, and we’ve been hit with a nasty powder bomb. PROMIXX Stainless Steel Electric Protein Shaker not only take all the hassle out of mixing but remain convenient. The base if rechargeable with a simple micro USB cord, so you can bring it with you and mix at the gym if you’d prefer. Everything is created without BPA or DEHP components, and all non-electric components are top rack dishwasher safe. No more hassle, no more clumpy protein shake.

    BPA and DEHP-free design

    Rechargeable base with a simple micro USB cord

    Lightweight with a fairly quiet operation

    Includes a one-year warranty straight from the manufacturer

    • BrandPromixx
    • Model4336315097
    • Weight14.1 ounces

    To us, Hydra Cup Shaker Bottle is one of the most iconic styles we’ve seen at the gym constantly. Hydra Cup slays the game when it comes to style, but also functions far better than most inexpensive protein shaker models on the market. You get twenty-eight ounces of storage space, as well as a separate protein powder storage container included with your purchase. Your lid is 100% leak-proof, so if this knocks around in the cup holder or in the mesh pocket of your backpack, you can rest assured that it won’t leak a single drop. Zero BPA used during uTorrent 3.5.4Latest Version - Crack Key For U, crafted in the USA, and built to last.

    Total of 28 oz capacity

    BPA-free construction

    Protein powder storage container included with purchase

    Leak-proof lid won’t stop for anything

    • BrandHydra Cup
    • Weight1.6 ounces

    InstaShaker Vortex Mixer Cup

    You’ll see that there aren’t many electric shakers on this list, but InstaShaker’s Vortex model just can’t be ignored. Attach your 20 oz reservoir to the motorized base, flip on the switch, and watch some magic happen. You have a 16,000 RPM motor going to town on your mixture. That means no clumps, no lumps or powdered protein shake mix just sitting around. It’s named Vortex for a reason: it pulls everything down, blending it furiously in a thirty-second interval, promising you nothing but the smoothest shake every single time. The chamber is made of 100% BPA-free acrylic, promising superior quality and an easy-to-clean surface every single time. You’ll also get a one-year warranty on the motor and electric parts, so there’s relatively no risk in trying your hand at an electric protein shaker.

    Fully electric base mixes your shake in thirty seconds

    16,000 RPM motor promises no lumps or powder clusters

    20 oz BPA-free container

    Includes a one-year warranty on electrical components

    • BrandInstaShaker
    • Weight14.1 ounces

    Bottled Joy Protein Shaker Bottle

    The joy should be in the cup, but we’re getting pretty excited just by the exterior. Bottled Joy created a simple and inexpensive protein shaker, with over eight different aesthetic styles to choose from, as well as a fully BPA-free construction. The star of the show here is the contoured finger inlays on the outside of the shaker, giving you full control while holding it. That’s good because the flip-up lid is difficult to get open thanks to the 100% leak-proof guarantee. If this ends up hitting the passenger side floor in the car, it’s not going to cost you a hundred bucks in some lowbrow detailing. Last but not least, Bottled Joy Protein Shaker Bottle is super simple to clean inside and out.

    Total of 27 oz of capacity

    Completely leak-proof lid

    Finger inlays on barrel for superior grip

    BPA-free and FDA approved

    • BrandBOTTLED JOY
    • Weight6.4 ounces

    Contigo Shake and Go Snap Fit Shaker Bottle

    contigo shake and go snap fit shaker bottle
    contigo shake and go snap fit shaker bottle

    If you’ve been wondering how little you can spend while still getting a quality protein shaker, Contigo is your answer. This simple bottle comes with a mixer ball to keep things shaken up, as well as a leak-proof lid to ensure things don’t get too wild. There’s a simple flip-top spout on the top, and twenty-eight ounces of capacity to quench every bit of thirst at the gym. As our best value pick, you’re getting minimal brand logos and aesthetics, but a ton of functionality. Not concerned with how your protein shaker bottle looks to the others at the gym? If you answered yes, then Contigo is about to save you some money.

    Easy snap-on lid

    Includes mixer ball

    Leak-proof lid

    Total of 28 oz of capacity

    • BrandContigo
    • Model70290
    • Weight4.2 ounces

    Grenade Shaker with Protein Compartment

    It’s by a company called grenade, and apparently, they have an awesome sense of humor. This simple twenty-ounce protein shaker looks very militant and includes a high walled spout that gives you a little bit more room to shake things up. You’re also going to get an inclusive protein compartment, which hooks right onto the bottom of your shaker to extend its height. Pair all that with the dual mixing system, and you’ve got one hell of a shaker that gets major style points. Making this aesthetic didn’t come at any cost on quality, because Grenade made these BPA and DEHP-free, making Grenade Shake excellent for the dishwasher, microwave or freezer without having to worry about breakage.

    Microwave and dishwasher safe (top rack)

    BPA and DEHP-free

    Includes a protein blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U with flawless attachment

    Total 20 oz capacity

    • BrandGrenade
    • Model6740006
    • Weight1 pounds

    Smartshake Original Shaker Cup

    Last but not least, this simple approach deserves some credit. With Smartshake Original Shaker Cup you get the measurement markings on the side, you get a stellar look, but most importantly, you end up saving an absolute mad wad of cash while still getting excellent mixing power. There’s a fully leak-proof lid, which also comes with a lanyard loop if you’re hooking this onto the side of your backpack before heading to the gym. It’s also completely BPA and DEHP-free, so you won’t have to worry about a single thing during use. Those properties are a result of superior construction, which also makes this 1005 dishwasher safe (top rack only). SmartShake focused on simple aesthetics, so choose from one of five different colors, and get mixing.

    Fully leak-proof lid and flip cover

    Top rack dishwasher safe

    BPA-free, DEHP-free and microwavable

    20 oz capacity with markings up to the 12 oz line

    • Brandsmartshake
    • Model7350057181065
    • Weight5.3 ounces

    Protein Shaker Buying Guide and FAQ

    We showed you twelve of the best protein shakers ever made, but now we’re going to discuss why they’re so awesome, and go over the rules of maintaining them, and what you need to look for before committing to the purchase.

    best protein shakers

    How do We Choose Our Selection of Protein Shakers

    Brand - Brand https www tenable com products nessus activation code - Activators Patch a big factor here. You have companies that dedicate themselves to fitness and health products, and have already come through the trial and error phase. The good thing is that with protein shakers, you’re not looking at brand being a huge upcharge on the price tag.

    Quality - Quality is difficult to measure, but when you take a look at locking mechanisms, anti-corrosion construction on manual mixer balls and a ton of other features, it all comes together as a full puzzle. Quality is alsop associated with brand. For instance, you aren’t going to see crummy versions of our top pick, BlenderBottle, because they consistently make excellent gym shakers.

    Reviews - The voice of the people, users who’ve tested them for months, who use them every day, and every other variety of review you can think of. These help us determine our shortlist before actually purchasing and testing products. They play a big role in determining what’s worth our time, and what isn’t worth a dime.

    Price - Price is always going to be a factor. Fortunately, most protein shaker bottles are relatively inexpensive, and won’t cost you more than an hour of wage to get a really high-quality one.

    best protein shakers

    Features to Look for in Protein Shakers

    Capacity - This is all going to depend on how hard you plan on going to the gym, and the volume of protein shake that you’re going to need. You’ll see a common theme of 24 oz and 32 oz bottles, which are perfect for most protein shakes.

    Mixing System - Whether it’s an electric mixer or a simple metal mixer ball, the mixing system is going to be the key here. Personally, we prefer manual mixer balls to help give it a more thorough, smooth texture and taste.

    Tight Seal - It’s a shaker, meaning you’re going to shake it before drinking it just about every single time. You want a tight seal, or it’s not worth your time and money.

    Materials - You’re predominately going to see different grades of plastic. The only thing you need to be on the lookout for, is ensuring that whichever gym shaker you have your heart set on is BPA-free, and you should be fine.

    Manual vs. Battery Operated - This is about preference, but it’s also about function. If you go with an electric unit, just know that even the best shaker bottle can run into problems, and then you’ll have to go manual. If you want to save money in the first place and have a more hands-on feel to your protein shake, stick with the manual from the start.

    Portability - You’ll be looking for lanyard loops on the lid, an ergonomic grip or finger inlays to make sipping easier, and a diameter/size that can fit in the mesh pocket of a backpack or a cup holder at the very least. If it’s not portable, you’re also going to have a hard time finding somewhere to place it down in the gym.

    mp3 monkey player - Activators Patch protein shakers" width="950" height="373">

    Protein Shaker FAQ

    Q: What is a Protein Shaker?

    A: A protein shaker is an enhanced plastic bottle that’s intended to go with you to the gym. It normally includes a very tight-fitting cap, a drinking spout of some sort, and most importantly, a mixer ball for the interior to help keep your drinks nice and smooth. Protein powder and other protein shake meal replacements often clump up if they’ve been sitting there for a bit, and the mixer ball is your ticket to revitalizing the smoothness of your shake.

    Q: Can I Mix Warm Liquids in my Protein Shaker?

    A: You absolutely can, so long as you follow one simple guideline. Don’t add boiling water into your protein shaker. Even though most plastics are made completely BPA-free, plastic is just a really hardened and condensed oil. Adding boiling water can extract elements out of the plastic and dissolve it into your food, which is really not good for your health. So long as you try to stay under a threshold of 200 F (which is easy), you can add warm liquids to your shaker.

    Q: How do I Get Rid of the Smell of my Protein Shaker?

    A: Whether milk, protein powder or added ingredients have given your gym shaker a funky smell, there’s an insanely simple way to take care of it. You have to think that if you have a manual shaker, the metal mixer in the middle can scratch up the inside of the shaker. If you stir it with a metal spoon or fork, you could scratch up the inside. This creates micro divots that can hold onto trace elements of bacteria, protein powder and milk. Sounds gross, but this is how you fix it.

    Get one full cup of distilled white vinegar. Place it in your protein shaker, then add two teaspoons of baking soda (preferably from a freshly opened container), and fill the rest with water. Vinegar is a natural sterilizing agent, and will work to remove particles. You’ll want to rinse this out thoroughly after leaving it to sit for a few hours, because now you’re going to have a vinegar scent. Run it through a cycle in the dishwasher and it’ll come out with no scent at all.

    best protein shakers

    Q: Can I Wash my Protein Shaker in the Dishwasher?

    A: Most protein shakers are made with durable plastic that can withstand the dishwasher, so long as you put it on the top rack. However, this won’t always be your best bet to clean it. Even if you have a fairly high-end new dishwasher, morsels of protein powder that caked to the inside of your manual protein shaker may still remain. It’s important to give it a thorough rinse, and run your hand along the inside of the container before putting it in the dishwasher, (or just washing it by hand to be doubly certain).

    Check the instruction packet that came with your shaker. You should have received a folded up square piece of paper in your shaker that states maintenance and care requirements. For certainty, wash by hand. If that’s not how you do things, be sure that the model you’re looking at is dishwasher safe before you commit to the purchase.

    Q: How do I Make the Best Protein Shake Ever?

    A: We’ll be the first to admit that there’s a ton of protein powders and formulas out there that look good on paper, but frankly just don’t entice your taste buds. Let’s fix that. We’ve got a few hacks that you can use on a whim to help modify and augment your protein shake, and get the most out of your gym shaker at the same time.

    1. Instead of using water as the instructions might deem, use 2% or skim milk to achieve a better all-around flavor palette. This adds a richer texture to the mixture, but if that texture is a bit too smooth for you, our next tip will help.
    2. Cut like you’ve never cut before. If you’re using six ounces of milk or water with your powder and it comes out tasting too thick or smooth, bounce up to eight ounces, and so on. Think of it as adding a shot of milk or water (two ounces) every single time to flavor is off to you. So long as you consume the whole drink, the worst thing that happens is you get more thorough hydration. It doesn’t diminish the quality of the protein powder.
    3. Add fresh fruit. Is it going to be a smooth and simple drink? Not exactly, but the natural sugars in pineapple, strawberries and blueberries will enrich the flavor, while changing up the texture. Plus, if you don’t get enough fruits during the week, this is the perfect way to kill two birds with one stone.
    Send
    Источник: https://www.instash.com/best-protein-shaker/

    Egg dos and don'ts & using eggs in cocktails

    Egg dos and don'ts & using eggs in cocktails image 1

    Eggs are essentially reproductive cells from everything from chickens to ducks and quails but here we are specifically looking at chicken eggs, their characteristics and how you should handle, store and use eggs in cocktails.

    Eggs in cocktails

    Egg white adds viscosity and mouthfeel to cocktails and drinks such as sours only taste their best when made with added egg white. Egg white can also add an attractive foamy head to cocktails and the amount of foam produced can be extenuated using a Dry Shake. However, raw eggs can be hazardous to health, so you may decide it is safer to use commercially produced pasteurised egg white, particularly if you are infirm or pregnant (but then you probably shouldn't be drinking cocktails anyway).

    Unfortunately, egg white in cocktails gives off an aroma not unlike dog breath or a damp dog's coat. This should be masked with a few drops of bitters dropped onto the drink's foamy head, expressing citrus zest oils (twist) over the drink or by dusting with chocolate, nutmeg or cinnamon.

    Too much egg white in a cocktail is detrimental and half of the white from a medium sized egg or 15ml/½oz of pasteurised egg white is plenty. When using fresh eggs rather than pasteurised egg white, I tend to crack eggs and separate their white into a small plastic squeeze bottle and then use this to squeeze the desired amount of egg white into each cocktail. Tip 1: Consider using an egg separator, prism video converter registration code nifty tool which as its name suggests separates and retains the yolk while allowing the yolk to flow through into your receptacle below. This helps avoid the chance of contamination from the shell by using the shell as a separating tool. Tip 2: It pays to shake the bottle before use to slightly loosen the egg whites. Refrigerate the bottle of egg white and use within 48 hours or preferably sooner.

    Like egg white, egg yolk adds texture and also subtle flavour and a rich sweetness to cocktails. Egg yolk is essential when making Nogs and Flips.

    Health issues with raw egg

    A small percentage of people are allergic to eggs with reactions against egg white more common than reactions against egg yolk. While not experiencing a true allergic reaction, some people have an intolerance to egg white. Whether allergic, merely intolerant or simply having a dislike for eggs, some people need/want to avoid egg and egg products, so bar menus should indicate their use in cocktails.

    I'm sure I've suffered more upset stomachs from drinking too much alcohol than I have as a result of bad eggs. That said, eggs are susceptible to Salmonella contamination so it's worth taking steps to reduce the risk of Salmonella poisoning so you should be aware of the following dos and don'ts.

    1. Consider using pasteurised egg rather than fresh egg. Particularly, in a bar or a restaurant, why would you take risk of serving fresh egg white when good quality refrigerated pasteurised egg white is undistinguishable from fresh egg white in a cocktail. Pasteurised egg white may cost a little more, but it comes in handy to use 500g Tera cartons - enough for 30+ cocktails.

    2. Use eggs well before their use-by-date and preferably eggs stamped with the British Lion eggs safe logo. On 11th October 2017, The Food Standards Agency changed its advice to say that British Lion marked eggs are safe to be eaten raw by vulnerable groups such as infants, children, pregnant women and elderly people. More than 90% of British eggs are now produced within the British Lion scheme, which requires producers to vaccinate their hens against salmonella and to test for salmonella.

    3.Use small or medium eggs rather than large sized eggs (as hens grow older, they will produce larger eggs so small eggs are from younger birds).

    4. Preferably use organic eggs as they are laid by hens who have been reared in the most humane way possible. Everything from their housing, freedom of movement and food is strictly governed. After organic, free-range is the next best environment for a hen to be raised and then barn eggs.

    5. If you buy eggs which have already been refrigerated (usual in USA), then you should keep them in the fridge or they will sweat. If you purchase eggs at room temperature (the norm in Europe) then you should be sure to store them below 20°C / 68°F and ideally refrigerated between 0.5 to 2.5°C / 33 to 36.5°F.

    6. It is best to store your eggs in a sealed box on the bottom self of the refrigerator. Storing in a box prevents smells permeating through the shells and flavouring the egg. Conversely you may want to place citrus peels, spices, truffles or teas in the box, or cotton wool infused with aromatic oil to flavour your eggs.

    7. Test the freshness of an egg by placing in water. A fresh egg will sink but a stale one will float.

    8. Salmonella contamination starts on the shell, moves to the egg white and then lastly the yolk, so always wash the shell of an egg under running warm/hot water immediately prior to using. However, due to their protective coating, don't wash eggs until ready to use. See washing eggs below.

    Don't consume raw eggs if

    1. You are uncertain about their freshness.

    2. There is a crack or flaw in the shell.

    3. They don't wobble when rolled across a flat surface.

    4. The egg white is watery instead of gel-like.

    5. The egg yolk is not convex and firm.

    6. The egg yolk bursts easily.

    7. They smell foul.

    8. Don't consume raw eggs at all if are pregnant or have a weak immune system or other health issues, particularly to the very young or very old.

    9. Don't think that blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U kills salmonella, it doesn't, at least at proof levels used in bars.

    10. Don't crack eggs on the side of your cocktail tin, salmonella may be present on the shell so beware of transferring this and cross contaminating your shaker.

    Washing eggs

    Eggs have a natural coating known as a cuticle or bloom that seals the eggshell pores so reducing moisture loss from the egg. This also helps prevent bacteria from breaching the shell. In the U.S. most eggs are washed and "sanitized" so removing the bloom, then a small percentage of U.S. egg packers re-coat their eggs with an edible mineral oil. European eggs are not washed by egg packers so are sold with the natural bloom. Wherever you are, you should not wash your eggs until immediately prior to use as if they have a coating then it best to retain it as long as possible. When you do wash your eggs, then rinse under running warm/hot water.

    Air cell

    When eggs are freshly laid their temperature is that of the body of the hen they have just popped out of, 41ºC/105ºF. As they cool to ambient temperature, the liquid inside the eggs contracts more than the shell, causing the inner shell membrane to separate from the outer shell membrane and so form an air pocket, or air cell. Over the following hours/days, moisture and carbon dioxide from the egg escape through the shell's pores and due to air pressure, air enters via the same pores so enlarging the air cell.

    When you peel a hard-boiled egg, you tend to find one pole of the egg is flattened due to the air cell which usually occupies the large end of the egg, displacing the egg white to form a flattened end when boiled.

    Due to the air cell developing and growing with time, older eggs are easier to peel that fresh eggs. The development of this air pocket also facilitates a useful test for the freshness of eggs. If the buoyancy caused by this air pocket causes an egg to float in a bowl of water, then it is bad and should be discarded. Only eggs that sink and stay submerged should be used in cocktails.

    Shell colour

    A hen's breed determines the shell colour of the eggs laid. Hens with white feathers and ear lobes lay white-shelled eggs while hens with red feathers and red ear lobes lay brown eggs.

    The shell colour has no influence on flavour or nutritionally value, yet despite this, different countries favour particular shell colours. White eggs are more prevalent in the USA, while brown shells are preferred in the UK. Marketing also dictates that most organic eggs and free-range eggs are brown. Indeed, I recall a food nutritionist say, "brown food is good and white food is bad". This may apply to bread and rice, but not to eggs.

    While shell colour has no baring on flavour, the colour of the yolk does. This is influenced by plant pigments in the hen's feed - more grass based feed or corn in particular. Tasty feed equals tasty eggs.

    Super food

    Eggs are very nutritious, containing high levels of protein, vitamins, selenium, iodine, choline, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids. Eggs are low in calories (around 65 calories in a medium-sized egg) with most of the calories are in the yolk which is also denser in vitamins and minerals.

    Egg white

    The egg white (or albumen/glair/glaire) forms around fertilized or unfertilised egg yolks and its primary purpose is to protect the yolk while also providing nutrition for the growth of the embryo (presuming the egg is fertilized).

    Egg white comprises approximately two-thirds of a chicken egg by weight with water accounting for some 90% of this, with the remaining 10% being protein, glucose, carbohydrate, sodium, fatty material and vitamins. Egg white is cholesterol free and an average sized egg white has a mere 17 calories. Egg whites contain just over 50% of the overall egg's protein content.

    Egg yolk

    Enclosed by the vitelline membrane and suspended in the egg white by one or two spiral bands of tissue called chalazae, the spherical egg yolk contains the egg cell or ovum (embryo). Its yellow colour is due to lutein and zeaxanthin, which are carotenoids known as xanthophylls.

    The yolk is rich in vitamins and minerals and contains all the egg's fat and cholesterol, and nearly half of its protein. Although just one-third of the egg's overall weight, the yolk contains three times the energy (calories) of the egg white and all of an egg's fat-soluble vitamins A, E, K and most notably D - egg yolk is one of the few foods blender bottle lid crack - Crack Key For U containing vitamin D.

    Double yolks - two yolks in one egg, come from young hens (pullets), typically 16 to 20 weeks old which are still settling into their egg laying cycle and ovulating too rapidly.

    Egg dos and don'ts & using eggs in cocktails image 1
    Источник: https://www.diffordsguide.com/encyclopedia/509/cocktails/egg-dos-and-donts-and-using-eggs-in-cocktails

    What is Autoclaving?

    Autoclaving is a sterilization method that uses high-pressure steam. The autoclaving process works by the concept that the boiling point of water (or steam) increases when it is under pressure.

     

     

    Image result for autoclave historyHistory of the Autoclave

    The name “Autoclave” comes from Greek “auto” ultimately meaning self, and Latin “clavis” meaning key, thus a self-locking device.

     

    The first autoclave was essentially a pressure cooker and was originally invented as a method for preparing food by French physician Denis Papin around 1681. He called his invention a "steam digester" and described benefits of using the device to process food for easier digestion. 

     

    Charles Chamberland.jpg

    The autoclave was re-invented for medical and scientific use by Charles Chamberland in 1879. Chamberland was a microbiologist who worked with Louis Pasteur.  By chance, he came up with a vaccine for chicken cholera. He went away on holiday, forgetting to inject the disease into some chickens. When he came back he saw the jar of bacteria still there and decided to inject it into the chickens anyway. To his amazement they did not die. When he reported this to Pasteur, he was told to inject a fresh form into the same chickens. Those chickens did not die. He had found a vaccine. This team also discovered that a weakened form of a disease can act as a vaccine.

     

     

    How an Autoclave Works

    Items to be autoclaved are subjected to gradual temperature increases under high pressure until 121 °C is reached and then steamed for around 15–20 minutes.

     

    The autoclave allows steam to flow around items in the chamber. The length of time and temperature necessary for sterilization depend on the items to be sterilized and whether they are wrapped or left directly exposed to the steam. Items should be separated to allow the steam to penetrate the load evenly. The steam can reach in small crevices and can kill all bacteria, viruses and bacterial spores.

     

    When to Autoclave

    Autoclaves can be used to eliminate microorganisms, cure composites, vulcanize rubber, and for hydrothermal synthesis. Autoclaving is a very dependable method for the sterilization and decontamination of laboratory glassware, medical instruments and waste, reagents, and other media. Autoclaves can inactivate fungi, bacteria, spores, viruses and other microorganisms on surgical instruments such as scalpels, forceps, scissors and other metal items.

     

     

    Why Autoclaving is Good for the Environment

    Because autoclaving sterilizes without the use of reagents and allows for the re-use of lab equipment and supplies, it is environmentally friendly. It can be used to sterilize medical waste before disposal, eliminating environmental concerns regarding incinerators.

     

     

    What Qorpak containers are Autoclavable?

    Glass bottles are generally safe for autoclaving but some caps may not be autoclavable. 

     

    Autoclavable products include:

    ·         Rubber Lined Phenolic Caps

    ·         Polypropylene Hole Caps with Bonded Septa

    ·         Unlined Polypropylene Caps with or without PTFE Disc Liners

    ·         Glass Bottles

    ·         Polypropylene Jars

     

    Precautions

    Closures should be autoclaved separately or very loosely on top of container; otherwise a vacuum is created during cooling. Liners will get sucked into the container or bottles and caps can crack or warp. Expanding vapors during heating can also cause containers to crack or explode without sufficient ventilation.

     

    This method of sterilization should not be used if the material to be sterilized can be damaged by heat or moisture. Plastic resins that cannot be autoclaved include PET, PETG, LDPE, and HDPE, PET, PETG.

    Paper products like paper and some plastic resins cannot be autoclaved due to the moist heat.

     

     

     

     

    Источник: https://www.qorpak.com/pages/autoclaving

    Pouring hot water to a pitcher

    Some people are skeptical about using a glass pitcher for holding boiling water and hot beverages such as coffee or tea. It is a reasonable prerogative as many of us have experienced pouring hot liquid into a glass container and ended up breaking it. But this is not always the case.

    Specifically made to withstand high temperatures, the best glass pitchers can hold hot drinks for a long time, and they will not crack. With extra care, you can even pour boiling water into these glass pitchers without shattering them.

    Why Does Glass Crack with Hot Water?

    A Pitcher of Berry Tea on Wooden Table

    A generic glass pitcher, made of ordinary glass, undergoes expansion when subject to heat. Once you pour boiling water into the glass, the inside part of the glass expands due to heat while the outer layer remains cool. The temperature difference will cause the inner layer to expand far greater than the outer part.

    The discrepancy in the amount of expansion between the inner and outer parts will create stress, which at some point will exceed the glass’s tensile strength. Once exceeded and the glass can no longer contain the pressure, also known as thermal shock, it will start to crack.

    Why Some Glass Pitchers Don’t Crack

    To be on the safe side, always use heat-resistant glass pitchers for your hot beverages. 

    Typically constructed of borosilicate download sql server - Free Activators, which is known to have a very low thermal expansion coefficient, they are more resistant to thermal shock than other glassware. They will not break under extreme temperature changes.

    The coefficient of thermal expansion indicates the rate at which the glass expands when exposed to heat. The higher it is, the greater the tendency of the glass to react to heat by expanding. With a low thermal expansion coefficient, borosilicate glass can withstand high temperatures without drastically changing its shape, area, volume, or AVS Video Editor 9.4.4.375 Crack Activation key Free src="https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1216/2612/files/mule_science_set_of_4_discount_banner_d21168f7-e05b-4bcc-aa1b-e544da66e8b1.jpg?v=1625792073" alt="">

    How to Prevent Glass Pitchers from Cracking

    Coffee in Glass Pitcher

    The effect of thermal shock is powerful and results in the cracking of glass. Even heat-resistant glasses like Pyrex can shatter when poured with boiling water incorrectly. To prevent the glass from cracking when exposed to boiling water, you should avoid extreme and abrupt changes in temperature. You can accomplish this in different ways.

    • Pour the boiling water gradually

    By pouring the hot water into the glass pitcher gradually, you will allow the glass to adjust slowly to the water’s high temperature, reducing thermal shock.

    Metal is an excellent heat conductor. When you put a metal spoon in the glass pitcher and slowly pour the water over the spoon, it will absorb some heat. This helps cool down the water that contacts the glass’s inner layer, minimizing its temperature deviation from the outer layer.

    Another effective way to prevent breaking your glass pitcher when putting boiling water into it is to warm it up first. Before filling the glass, rinse it with 50% tap water and 50% boiling water; the outer layer first, then the inside part. By exposing the outside to heat, you let it expand before pouring the entire boiling water into the bottle, which means less thermal shock.

    Shatter-Free Glass Pitcher

    Pouring boiling water into stellar phoenix photo recovery 8.0 0.0 crack with key full free download - Crack Key For U glass pitcher can be tricky. The key is to reduce the temperature difference between the inner and outer layers. By minimizing thermal shock, you can enjoy a no-worry, shatter-free pour.

    Let us know your thoughts about glass pitchers in the comment section below. If you found this article helpful, feel free to share it with your friends.


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    Источник: https://advancedmixology.com/blogs/art-of-mixology/pour-boiling-water-into-glass-pitcher

    RSP Nutrition Shaker Bottle

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